Aerial photograph of the Immaculate Conception Chapel

ENG-200-02, War in the Arts

This course will discuss and research what it means to be human through two perspectives: 1.) the effects war has on art, as well as 2.) the effects art has on a society before, during, and after its wars. We will travel along many paths, most of which will be chosen by students. After our general discussions, each student will select her or his favorite or most intriguing piece of art about war to focus on for the final research project.

Text:

  • Art and War, by Laura Brandon

Other articles and stories:

  • “Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler’s Ninth Symphony,” by Lewis Thomas
  • “Soldier’s Home,” by Ernest Hemingway
  • “How to Tell a True War Story,” by Tim O’Brien
  • “Warrior Code,” by Elizabeth Samet
  • “Quotes by Sun Tzu,” by Sun Tzu
  • “Artists in Time of War,” by Howard Zinn

Poets:                                                                          

  • Fred Kirchner                                                                        
  • Gerald McCarthy                                                       
  • Marilyn M. McMahon                                                           
  • Robert Lee Brewer                                                   
  • Matthew Arnold                                                        
  • Wilfred Owen
  • Siegfried Sasson
  • Yusef Komunyakaa

Songs and Videos:

  • Billy Joel
  • Paul Simon
  • John Lennon
  • Maya Lin

Other Readings:

  • Poetics, by Aristotle
  • “Concepts of Beauty,” by Thomas Aquinas
  • “The Idea of a University,” by Cardinal John Henry Newman
  • “War and Anti-War Art,” by Pablo Picasso

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ENG 200-03, Cancer

The focus of our reading and writing in this course is cancer.  The subject presents many questions as starting points, and reading and writing assignments in the course will move across disciplines to find at least partial answers. For example, current cancer research and cancer treatment raise questions concerning:

  • the physical and spiritual journey of  cancer;
  • how gender, ethnicity, or economic status affects access to treatment, or funding for research;
  • the ethics of treatment, palliative care, and end of life care;
  • images and metaphors of cancer;
  • challenges presented to individuals, families, and communities,  in terms of financial, emotional, or psychological costs;
  • the outcomes of hope and despair, perseverance and acquiescence,
  • what is illuminated concerning the human condition in the stories of those who suffer, survive, or succumb to cancer. 

The three primary disciplines represented in our readings are English Studies, Religion, and Medicine / Science.

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ENG-200-04, Disability and Culture

What does it mean to be disabled? Is disability the same thing for people across cultures, genders, and ages? In what ways do rhetoricians, medical doctors, historians, and sociologists understand the concept of disability? What does disability mean to a deaf woman, an anxious student, and a man with cerebral palsy?

In this course, ENG 200: Disability and Culture, students will develop reading, writing, research, and critical thinking skills by exploring, in writing, the ways various disciplines treat the topic of disability. Students will develop critical reading skills and rhetorical awareness by studying how writers in different fields talk about disability and, in turn, construct the cultural concept of disability. Primary and secondary research skills will be a focus of the course and will allow students to collect, critique, and synthesize works and to construct original, rhetorically effective arguments. In reading and writing about discipline-specific conversations on disability, students will develop a greater understanding of disability in our culture, how oral and written discourses help to create those conceptions, and how those conceptions construct individual identities. 

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ENG-200-05, Cancer

The focus of our reading and writing in this course is cancer.  The subject presents many questions as starting points, and reading and writing assignments in the course will move across disciplines to find at least partial answers. For example, current cancer research and cancer treatment raise questions concerning:

  • the physical and spiritual journey of  cancer;
  • how gender, ethnicity, or economic status affects access to treatment, or funding for research;
  • the ethics of treatment, palliative care, and end of life care;
  • images and metaphors of cancer;
  • challenges presented to individuals, families, and communities,  in terms of financial, emotional, or psychological costs;
  • the outcomes of hope and despair, perseverance and acquiescence,
  • what is illuminated concerning the human condition in the stories of those who suffer, survive, or succumb to cancer. 

The three primary disciplines represented in our readings are English Studies, Religion, and Medicine / Science.

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This section of English 200 considers scientific, socio-cultural, historical, philosophical and medical/psychiatric analysis, along with personal narratives concerning UFO and alien abduction phenomena across the globe.  We ask the basic question:  Are we alone in the universe?  We'll read from a variety of academic and journalistic texts about the history and metaphysics of such occurrences, and physics and science involved with "contact," as well as popular culture accounts of this social phenomena.  

As a continuation of ENG 100, this section of ENG 200 will apply and build on the same principles of writing, critical thinking, and research that underlie the ENG 100 syllabus.  We will read five seminal books from the study of UFO's, focusing on summary, analysis, synthesis, and research.  Finally, we will consider how each text makes certain types of arguments within a discourse community while developing our own arguments.  ENG 200 will also promote the development of a wide range of strategies for constructing arguments, using textual evidence for support, doing deep research, and documenting your research.

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ENG-200-08, Superheroes (in) and Society

This English 200 investigates various definitions of, genres of, and writing conventions that represent the “Superhero” and its prominence throughout history and popular cultures.  We will explore mythologies of superheroes; investigate similarities and differences between heroes and villains; consider ways that different disciplines write about superheroes; and consider diversity among races/ethnicities, classes, genders, and sexualities of superheroes.  As a continuation of ENG 100, ENG 200 will apply and build on the same principles of writing, critical thinking, and research that underlie the 100 syllabus.  Moving at a brisk pace, ENG 200 will focus on the importance of reading texts carefully, while highlighting the role of narrative discourses, disciplinary conventions, and generic writing in constructing meaning in texts and arguments.  ENG 200 will also promote the development of a wide range of strategies for constructing arguments, using textual evidence for support, doing deep research, and documenting your research.  “Avengers Assemble!”

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ENG-200-09, Superheroes (in) and Society

This English 200 investigates various definitions of, genres of, and writing conventions that represent the “Superhero” and its prominence throughout history and popular cultures.  We will explore mythologies of superheroes; investigate similarities and differences between heroes and villains; consider ways that different disciplines write about superheroes; and consider diversity among races/ethnicities, classes, genders, and sexualities of superheroes.  As a continuation of ENG 100, ENG 200 will apply and build on the same principles of writing, critical thinking, and research that underlie the 100 syllabus.  Moving at a brisk pace, ENG 200 will focus on the importance of reading texts carefully, while highlighting the role of narrative discourses, disciplinary conventions, and generic writing in constructing meaning in texts and arguments.  ENG 200 will also promote the development of a wide range of strategies for constructing arguments, using textual evidence for support, doing deep research, and documenting your research.  “Avengers Assemble!”

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ENG-200-10, Superheroes (in) and Society

 This English 200 investigates various definitions of, genres of, and writing conventions that represent the “Superhero” and its prominence throughout history and popular cultures.  We will explore mythologies of superheroes; investigate similarities and differences between heroes and villains; consider ways that different disciplines write about superheroes; and consider diversity among races/ethnicities, classes, genders, and sexualities of superheroes.  As a continuation of ENG 100, ENG 200 will apply and build on the same principles of writing, critical thinking, and research that underlie the 100 syllabus.  Moving at a brisk pace, ENG 200 will focus on the importance of reading texts carefully, while highlighting the role of narrative discourses, disciplinary conventions, and generic writing in constructing meaning in texts and arguments.  ENG 200 will also promote the development of a wide range of strategies for constructing arguments, using textual evidence for support, doing deep research, and documenting your research.  “Avengers Assemble!”

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ENG-200-11, China's Middle Class

The goal of this course is to assist you in raising your rhetorical awareness and improving your critical thinking, research, and writing skills through process-based writing practices.  In this course, we will discuss the concept of the middle class in China as compared with the definitions for the middle class in the United States.  We will study the growth of this group from its historical perspective, the performance of this group, as well as the global significance of this group to see what makes this group unique.  To make connections with other disciplines, including Education, History, Philosophy, Political Science, and English, we will read and analyze texts with various disciplinary perspectives of the rising middle class in China.  The assigned materials, published in China (in English) and the US, will be literary, historical, political, journalistic, and cultural studies oriented.  You will complete a series of writing assignments from cultural heritage reflection to rhetorical analysis, informative synthesis, and finally a researched argumentative paper.

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ENG-200-13, Zombie Apocalypse

Zombies are everywhere.  Zombie movies make millions.  Zombie television shows get record viewership.  Zombie books become bestsellers.  Zombies are in more video games than any other antagonist.  Zombies are everywhere.  This course aims to find out why.  What makes zombies such a force in pop culture?  Why are we so obsessed with such a dark, violent subject?  Why does my 4-year-old niece know what a zombie is? 

Students will engage a variety of zombie media, from the bestselling Zombie Survival Guide to the classic Night of the Living Dead.  Students will also read scholarly work written about zombies and the phenomenon of their rise to fame.  In learning about zombies, students will also learn about people, about themselves; to learn what it means to be human, we must first look at what it means to be not human.  The coursework consists of filmic and literary analysis papers and a substantial research project where students will take on a topic of their choosing.  Through this, students will have a chance to contribute their ideas and writing to the burgeoning field of zombie scholarship.  

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ENG-200-14, (W)rites of Passage

While this ENG 200 is primarily a writing course, we will examine our own writing, reading, critical thinking, and research practices through the lens of “coming of age.”  Our investigation of this somewhat elusive concept will center along several specific lines of inquiry:

  1. What is “coming of age”?  Is there such a unique period / experience?  Whom does it affect in particular (tweens, teens, emerging adults)?  (Can we pinpoint when one has “come of age”?)
  2. What are some “rites of passage,” both formal (educational, governmental, cultural) and informal (personal or familial), that bring meaning to “coming of age”?  What significance, if any, do these “rites of passage” have in the “coming of age” process?
  3. Is “coming of age” primarily a Western concept, or a universal one?  What are some cultural differences and similarities of “coming of age”?
  4. Are young people and/or the “coming of age” process misrepresented by the media, researchers, and/or adults?

The readings and assignments for this course will draw from multiple disciplines, including history, literary studies, sociology, education, and religious studies.  Together, we will perform our own (W)Rites of Passage as we learn to deconstruct and then build up our own unique understanding of the complexity of “coming of age.”

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ENG-200-15, Superheroes (in) and Society

This English 200 investigates various definitions of, genres of, and writing conventions that represent the “Superhero” and its prominence throughout history and popular cultures.  We will explore mythologies of superheroes; investigate similarities and differences between heroes and villains; consider ways that different disciplines write about superheroes; and consider diversity among races/ethnicities, classes, genders, and sexualities of superheroes.  As a continuation of ENG 100, ENG 200 will apply and build on the same principles of writing, critical thinking, and research that underlie the 100 syllabus.  Moving at a brisk pace, ENG 200 will focus on the importance of reading texts carefully, while highlighting the role of narrative discourses, disciplinary conventions, and generic writing in constructing meaning in texts and arguments.  ENG 200 will also promote the development of a wide range of strategies for constructing arguments, using textual evidence for support, doing deep research, and documenting your research.  “Avengers Assemble!”

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ENG-200-16, War Fiction

This section will study how various aspects of war have been represented in fiction.  We will look at such figures and events as basic training, the enemy, the wounded, home-coming, and mental trauma.  We will try to study as broad a range of texts as we can, in terms of both genre (film, novel, song) and conflict (the American Civil War, the 1991 Gulf War).  One of our concerns during the semester will be to identify if the fiction we are studying ultimately works to distance us from war, or to bring us imaginatively closer to it.   This will be significant as we speculate upon how these texts contribute to a kind of national consciousness and address a number of moral concerns.   However, as far as the papers are concerned, students will have the opportunity to choose their own focus and pursue their own interests.  Major writing assignments will encourage students to develop their own writing process, construct their own arguments, and conduct/use research. 

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ENG-200-17, Authorship

What does it mean to be an author, creator, and content owner in today’s media-saturated world? This course explores different notions of authorship, from the romantic view of a single, inspired author to forms of collective authorship in which creators freely appropriate, remix, mash, and share music, video, images, text, and other forms of popular media across a “creative commons.”

Students will explore the ethical, legal, and social implications of being a content creator and content consumer by examining issues such as copyright, fair use, and plagiarism. We’ll also examine how laws and social norms throughout history have placed authors’ rights in conflict with the public’s desire to access, share, and financially benefit from content.

In addition to traditional forms of academic writing, students can create a digital media project by sampling and remixing “found” media (e.g., video, music, images, text) with their own media. This course emphasizes making connections with other Humanities disciplines, including History, Philosophy, Religious Studies, and English, as we explore and integrate various disciplinary perspectives of authorship and ownership.

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ENG-200-18, Imprisonment

The concept of imprisonment in American culture reaches far beyond the bars of a jail cell.  While we will investigate the history of the modern American prison system, we will also focus on the multitude of ways race, gender, social class, and sexuality work to imprison members of society.  ENG 200 is primarily a writing course, however, the selected readings and papers will draw from multiple disciplines such as philosophy, history, sociology, law, and religious studies in order to build an understanding of the complexity of imprisonment.  This course will require both presentations and papers that focus on argument as well as literary analysis. 

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ENG-200-19, Cancer

The focus of our reading and writing in this course is cancer.  The subject presents many questions as starting points, and reading and writing assignments in the course will move across disciplines to find at least partial answers. For example, current cancer research and cancer treatment raise questions concerning:

  • the physical and spiritual journey of  cancer;
  • how gender, ethnicity, or economic status affects access to treatment, or funding for research;
  • the ethics of treatment, palliative care, and end of life care;
  • images and metaphors of cancer;
  • challenges presented to individuals, families, and communities,  in terms of financial, emotional, or psychological costs;
  • the outcomes of hope and despair, perseverance and acquiescence,
  • what is illuminated concerning the human condition in the stories of those who suffer, survive, or succumb to cancer. 

The three primary disciplines represented in our readings are English Studies, Religion, and Medicine / Science.

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ENG-200-20, Amish

This course explores the fascinating culture of the Amish including their religious beliefs (such as pacifism), their commitments about limiting the impact of technology in their lives, and their convictions regarding the separation of themselves from the state. It also looks at how these people of deep tradition and preservation have nevertheless changed significantly over the last twenty years as they have been forced off the farm. The course focuses on the production of a research project (written in several stages) on a topic of the student's choosing that is related to the Amish. Some of the research for that project takes place on a required one-day trip to Ohio's Amish Country about mid-semester that includes dinner in an Amish home. A fee associated with this course provides the student's contribution to the expense of the trip.

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ENG 200-22, (W)rites of Passage

While this ENG 200 is primarily a writing course, we will examine our own writing, reading, critical thinking, and research practices through the lens of “coming of age.”  Our investigation of this somewhat elusive concept will center along several specific lines of inquiry:

  1. What is “coming of age”?  Is there such a unique period / experience?  Whom does it affect in particular (tweens, teens, emerging adults)?  (Can we pinpoint when one has “come of age”?)
  2. What are some “rites of passage,” both formal (educational, governmental, cultural) and informal (personal or familial), that bring meaning to “coming of age”?  What significance, if any, do these “rites of passage” have in the “coming of age” process?
  3. Is “coming of age” primarily a Western concept, or a universal one?  What are some cultural differences and similarities of “coming of age”?
  4. Are young people and/or the “coming of age” process misrepresented by the media, researchers, and/or adults?

The readings and assignments for this course will draw from multiple disciplines, including history, literary studies, sociology, education, and religious studies.  Together, we will perform our own (W)Rites of Passage as we learn to deconstruct and then build up our own unique understanding of the complexity of “coming of age.”

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The overall goal for this course is for everyone to become stronger writers, thinkers and researchers. This will be accomplished through close textual analysis, research and composition through the lens of Glam Rock. Glam Rock began in the late 1960’s in England with such musical acts as T.Rex and David Bowie and has worked under the radar to influence music and popular culture since then. By closely studying the creation, livelihood and social influence of Glam Rock on popular culture, students will gain a better understanding of societal and cultural differences within decades passed.

In order for us to better understand Glam Rock and its importance, we will be looking at it through Historical, Sociological and English studies stand points. This will allow us to better grasp and analyze the common themes within this subgenre of music: sexual exploration, exploration of self and drug exploration.  Besides closely examining the actual music of this subgenre, we will also be watching and analyzing documentaries concerning the bands and popular cultural references within the course. 

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As society’s emphasis on popular figures, events, and trends increases in the postmodern era, one thing remains the same about popular culture, its central themes never stop changing thanks to continually advancing technology.  We live in a nation where reality show results are announced on the morning news, where the latest celebrity gossip always makes headlines, and where the most highly targeted and influential age group in advertising is 18-24. In light of this new cultural emphasis on the popular, this class will explore current American themes, such as our obsession with consumerism, social representation of gender codes, and forming ethnic and religious identities. And more specifically, we will be looking at the influences that TV, film and new media have on these themes.

This course is designed to challenge students to begin critically observing the culture that they interact with on a daily basis through scholarly and popular texts, television programing, music, and new media such as blogging and social networking sites. Through the use of current assigned texts, in-class discussion, and group collaboration students will have an opportunity to bring their non-academic interests and observations into the classroom and critically analyze them in different ways to develop skills with various modes of discourse. Assignments will be heavily reading and writing based and will also include observation and exploration of the various forms of media listed above.  Requirements will be include four  to five major writing assignments along with weekly journal entries. 

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ENG-200-25, Writing in the DigitalAge

In this writing course, we will examine our writing, reading, critical thinking and research skills within the digital world we now inhabit. We will investigate the relationship between traditional notions of writing and modern theories and practices of new media. The areas the course will grapple with include:

  • new ways of scrutinizing and handling overwhelming amounts of information online
  • new methods of reading and writing made possible through new media
  • how new media impacts the ways people work, form communities, and perform citizenship
  • issues of authority, immediacy, permanence and response in digital texts

In order to complete these inquiries, we’ll use texts from multiple disciplines, including history, sociology, education and literary studies. We will analyze texts, conduct research and write five major essays. The goal is to improve as writers, critical thinkers and researchers over the course of the semester.

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The overall goal for this course is for everyone to become stronger writers, thinkers and researchers. This will be accomplished through close textual analysis, research and composition through the lens of Glam Rock. Glam Rock began in the late 1960’s in England with such musical acts as T.Rex and David Bowie and has worked under the radar to influence music and popular culture since then. By closely studying the creation, livelihood and social influence of Glam Rock on popular culture, students will gain a better understanding of societal and cultural differences within decades passed.

In order for us to better understand Glam Rock and its importance, we will be looking at it through Historical, Sociological and English studies stand points. This will allow us to better grasp and analyze the common themes within this subgenre of music: sexual exploration, exploration of self and drug exploration.  Besides closely examining the actual music of this subgenre, we will also be watching and analyzing documentaries concerning the bands and popular cultural references within the course. 

Top

As society’s emphasis on popular figures, events, and trends increases in the postmodern era, one thing remains the same about popular culture, its central themes never stop changing thanks to continually advancing technology.  We live in a nation where reality show results are announced on the morning news, where the latest celebrity gossip always makes headlines, and where the most highly targeted and influential age group in advertising is 18-24. In light of this new cultural emphasis on the popular, this class will explore current American themes, such as our obsession with consumerism, social representation of gender codes, and forming ethnic and religious identities. And more specifically, we will be looking at the influences that TV, film and new media have on these themes.

This course is designed to challenge students to begin critically observing the culture that they interact with on a daily basis through scholarly and popular texts, television programing, music, and new media such as blogging and social networking sites. Through the use of current assigned texts, in-class discussion, and group collaboration students will have an opportunity to bring their non-academic interests and observations into the classroom and critically analyze them in different ways to develop skills with various modes of discourse. Assignments will be heavily reading and writing based and will also include observation and exploration of the various forms of media listed above.  Requirements will be include four  to five major writing assignments along with weekly journal entries. 

Top

ENG-200-28, Writing in the Digital Age

In this writing course, we will examine our writing, reading, critical thinking and research skills within the digital world we now inhabit. We will investigate the relationship between traditional notions of writing and modern theories and practices of new media. The areas the course will grapple with include:

  • new ways of scrutinizing and handling overwhelming amounts of information online
  • new methods of reading and writing made possible through new media
  • how new media impacts the ways people work, form communities, and perform citizenship
  • issues of authority, immediacy, permanence and response in digital texts

In order to complete these inquiries, we’ll use texts from multiple disciplines, including history, sociology, education and literary studies. We will analyze texts, conduct research and write five major essays. The goal is to improve as writers, critical thinkers and researchers over the course of the semester.

 

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ENG-200-29, Vocation

In this section of English 200, students will study the various meanings of vocation.  The course readings are drawn from a range of disciplines, including literature, philosophy, religious studies, history, and film studies.  Through a series of formal and informal writing assignments, students will also examine their own calling, explore possible careers, and identify ways to use their gifts and talents to serve others.  Big questions of the course include: Where am I going in life?  What do I want my future to be?  What am I being called to do?  How much choice do I have defining my life?  What are my unique gifts and talents?  What are my obligations to others?

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ENG-200-31, Imprisonment

The concept of imprisonment in American culture reaches far beyond the bars of a jail cell.  While we will investigate the history of the modern American prison system, we will also focus on the multitude of ways race, gender, social class, and sexuality work to imprison members of society.  ENG 200 is primarily a writing course, however, the selected readings and papers will draw from multiple disciplines such as philosophy, history, sociology, law, and religious studies in order to build an understanding of the complexity of imprisonment.  This course will require both presentations and papers that focus on argument as well as literary analysis. 

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ENG-200-32, Imprisonment

The concept of imprisonment in American culture reaches far beyond the bars of a jail cell.  While we will investigate the history of the modern American prison system, we will also focus on the multitude of ways race, gender, social class, and sexuality work to imprison members of society.  ENG 200 is primarily a writing course, however, the selected readings and papers will draw from multiple disciplines such as philosophy, history, sociology, law, and religious studies in order to build an understanding of the complexity of imprisonment.  This course will require both presentations and papers that focus on argument as well as literary analysis. 

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