Aerial photograph of the Immaculate Conception Chapel

ENG-200H-B1, Social Justice

The content of this section of ENG 200H to be determined.

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ENG-200H-B2, Social Justice

The content of this section of ENG 200H to be determined.

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ENG-200H-H1, Obedience & Authority

Mindful or Mindlessness: Obedience and Authority": overarching theme is the tensions between various types of authority and between what Erich Fromm calls the "humanitarian" conscience and the "authoritarian" conscience. Through readings in the disciplines of sociology, philosophy and literature, students examine and respond to questions concerning the nature of obedience, the guidelines for disobedience and the relationship between freedom and literacy.


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ENG-200H-H2, Obedience & Authority

Mindful or Mindlessness: Obedience and Authority": overarching theme is the tensions between various types of authority and between what Erich Fromm calls the "humanitarian" conscience and the "authoritarian" conscience. Through readings in the disciplines of sociology, philosophy and literature, students examine and respond to questions concerning the nature of obedience, the guidelines for disobedience and the relationship between freedom and literacy.

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ENG 200H-H3, The Culture of Hip Hop

This course will use hip hop as a lens to examine the nexus of race, class, and gender. We will begin by building our close reading skills, learning to identify the linguistic complexity and cultural specificity reflected in contemporary hip hop; we will learn to read and apply secondary sources to expand our abilities to engage the specific cultural, social, and political debates cutting across and informing hip hop poetics, specifically the representation of women, and the ways in which hip-hop is used to engage the structures of racism in American thought. Students will use these skills to identify and pursue their own focused research, looking to engage a particular body of songs and secondary readings that they will collect and apply to build their final research paper. Along the way, we will create a classroom context that is responsive to the nuance and complexity of hip-hop, both from the way it is produced to the way it is consumed and understood in the public sphere.

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ENG 200H-H4, Authorship

What does it mean to be an author, creator, and content owner in today’s media-saturated world? This course explores different notions of authorship, from the romantic view of a single, inspired author to forms of collective authorship in which creators freely appropriate, remix, mash, and share music, video, images, text, and other forms of popular media across a “creative commons.”

Students will explore the ethical, legal, and social implications of being a content creator and content consumer by examining issues such as copyright, fair use, and plagiarism. We’ll also examine how laws and social norms throughout history have placed authors’ rights in conflict with the public’s desire to access, share, and financially benefit from content.

In addition to traditional forms of academic writing, students can create a digital media project by sampling and remixing “found” media (e.g., video, music, images, text) with their own media. This course emphasizes making connections with other Humanities disciplines, including History, Philosophy, Religious Studies, and English, as we explore and integrate various disciplinary perspectives of authorship and ownership.

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ENG 200H-H5, Modernism and its Discontents

The focus of this course will be on writing—specifically, academic writing.  That said, what we will be reading and writing about will be “modernism.”  This term refers to various early-20th-Century artistic movements—in the visual arts, music, literature, etc.—but it is also used when discussing how the Roman Catholic Church responded to various social changes in the 20th century (culminating in the Second Vatican Council).  During the semester, our class will consider what modernism means across these various disciplinary perspectives (Art History, Music, Literature and Religious Studies), and how students can read and write more critically about this complex subject.

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ENG-200H-H6, Buffy: Girls & Vampires

This course centers on the television series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and its relevance to and implications upon society and culture. While it might seem to be just an arbitrarily chosen television series, Buffy is the most scholarly discussed television show in history; even though it ended its run nearly a decade ago, academic conferences are held every year that focus solely on Buffy. This is a testament to the show’s rich subtext and significance. As a consequence, a vast array of scholarly writing exists about Buffy; in the course, students will be able to engage these texts and contribute their own writing to the canon of scholarly work on Buffy. Students will perform significant research about a variety of topics related to Buffy, including gender, sexuality, responsibility, vocation, vigilantism, justice, and humanity. All of these topics, and many more, are addressed in the series either textually or subtextually, and each are written about extensively in the canon of scholarly Buffy writing.

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The goal of this class is for everyone in the course to become stronger writers, researchers, and thinkers by writing 5 major essays, conducting library research, and analyzing texts and scholarship in and around the broad theme of heavy metal music.  Metal music has been around for more than 40 years now, and throughout its existence it has been derided by the press, hated by the religious right, and generally looked down upon by much of society.  So why study it?  Because despite all the naysayers and haters, heavy metal has remained and flourished in the public eye for nearly half a century and continues to do so today.

What is it about this music that draws so many fans—both young and old?  We will examine its history, beginning with the first true metal band Black Sabbath and continue by looking at heavy metal culture through the eyes of noted experts in the field.  We will also examine the music, history, and culture by viewing three films—two documentaries and one acclaimed theatrical production.  Finally, we will look at metal’s relationship to religion, particularly Islam and Catholicism, and in doing so attempt to examine the role that the music plays in cultures as diverse and different as those in the Middle East and the West.

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ENG 200H-H8, Human Rights in the Indigenous Americas

The thematic focus of the course directly addresses the complexity and diversity of human experience and the ways in which multiple human rights violations assault the essential dignity of the human person. Students will consider the diversity and complexity of these experiences through texts by authors with regionally, economically, and culturally specific experiences. These reading will include: Achy Obejas’ creative non-fiction account of her migration from Cuba to the United States and the formation of her cross-cultural, lesbian identity; Witi Ihimaera’s The Whale Rider (which addresses contemporary Maori struggles for cultural survival); Rigoberta Menchú’s account of indigenous resistance in the context of the Guatemalan Civil War; Alberto Luis Urrea’s The Devil’s Highway (a non-fiction account of the perilous journey of a group of Mexican migrants abandoned in the Sonora desert); and the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Through a series of writing assignments (ranging from literary analysis to a researched argumentative synthesis paper) students will be tasked with cultivating arguments of their own about these texts and, in the process, grappling with the complex issues raised by assigned authors. In this manner students will enter into conversations about cultural and national identity, migration, and the rights of human beings irrespective of national borders.

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ENG-200H-H9, Buffy: Girls & Vampires

This course centers on the television series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and its relevance to and implications upon society and culture. While it might seem to be just an arbitrarily chosen television series, Buffy is the most scholarly discussed television show in history; even though it ended its run nearly a decade ago, academic conferences are held every year that focus solely on Buffy. This is a testament to the show’s rich subtext and significance. As a consequence, a vast array of scholarly writing exists about Buffy; in the course, students will be able to engage these texts and contribute their own writing to the canon of scholarly work on Buffy. Students will perform significant research about a variety of topics related to Buffy, including gender, sexuality, responsibility, vocation, vigilantism, justice, and humanity. All of these topics, and many more, are addressed in the series either textually or subtextually, and each are written about extensively in the canon of scholarly Buffy writing.

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ENG 200H-HA, Obedience and Authority

Mindful or Mindlessness: Obedience and Authority": overarching theme is the tensions between various types of authority and between what Erich Fromm calls the "humanitarian" conscience and the "authoritarian" conscience. Through readings in the disciplines of sociology, philosophy and literature, students examine and respond to questions concerning the nature of obedience, the guidelines for disobedience and the relationship between freedom and literacy.

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ENG-200H-HB, Cancer

The focus of our reading and writing in this course is cancer.  The subject presents many questions as starting points, and reading and writing assignments in the course will move across disciplines to find at least partial answers. For example, current cancer research and cancer treatment raise questions concerning:

  • the physical and spiritual journey of  cancer;
  • how gender, ethnicity, or economic status affects access to treatment, or funding for research;
  • the ethics of treatment, palliative care, and end of life care;
  • images and metaphors of cancer;
  • challenges presented to individuals, families, and communities,  in terms of financial, emotional, or psychological costs;
  • the outcomes of hope and despair, perseverance and acquiescence,
  • what is illuminated concerning the human condition in the stories of those who suffer, survive, or succumb to cancer. 

The three primary disciplines represented in our readings are English Studies, Religion, and Medicine / Science.

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ENG 200H-HD, War Fiction

This section will study how various aspects of war have been represented in fiction.  We will look at such figures and events as basic training, the enemy, the wounded, home-coming, and mental trauma.  We will try to study as broad a range of texts as we can, in terms of both genre (film, novel, song) and conflict (the American Civil War, the 1991 Gulf War).  One of our concerns during the semester will be to identify if the fiction we are studying ultimately works to distance us from war, or to bring us imaginatively closer to it.   This will be significant as we speculate upon how these texts contribute to a kind of national consciousness and address a number of moral concerns.   However, as far as the papers are concerned, students will have the opportunity to choose their own focus and pursue their own interests.  Major writing assignments will encourage students to develop their own writing process, construct their own arguments, and conduct/use research. 

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ENG-200H-HE, Lit's Child Stars

In this course, students will examine literary works that use children as protagonists/narrators. Students will consider the implications of using a child's point of view to discuss trauma and/or social issues. Readings will include such works as Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison and The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, as well as other works of fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. We will engage with multiple disciplines, including sociology, history and psychology in order to consider historical and social contexts and to research possible psychological effects on children who endure such scenarios. Formal writing assignments will allow students to critically analyze issues of class, race, and gender from a child's perspective and to examine how that perspective helps or hinders their understanding of these issues.

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ENG-200H-HG

The topic of this section of ENG 200H to be determined.

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ENG-200H-HF, Getting Medieval

Consider this problem: if we call the Middle Ages a “dark ages” and foist all the bad things that have happened in human history onto the past, then we modern—and “enlightened”—humans can feel evolved and beyond all those unfortunate events that happened in the medieval past. Saying that the bad stuff is “medieval,” as opposed to “modern,” means that we “have been there, done that” and are not responsible for worrying about all that ugliness that pervaded the Medieval Times (or Middle Ages) when people were (presumably) uninformed by contemporary discourse about equal rights, human rights, and social justice. But believing that we have moved beyond hate (in the guise of homophobia, antisemitism, and misogyny) is way too idealistic. Hopeful, yes, but way too idealistic. The literature of the Middle Ages still reaches out to us and touches us in uncomfortable ways because try as we might, we really can’t ignore that reach, that touch. Medieval texts reveal human weaknesses that still prevail in our contemporary world, where antisemitism, homophobia, and misogyny continue to deny humans their basic human rights. In “Getting Medieval” we trace the presence of the medieval in our modern world.

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ENG-200H-S1, Sustainability, Energy, and the Environment

This course is connected to the Living and Learning Community for Sustainability, Energy and the Environment (SEE). SEE is an interdisciplinary program at UD that offers a minor, and works closely with the Rivers Stewards, another environmental student program on campus. However, even if you are not part of the SEE Living and Learning Community, but you do have an interest in environmental issues, or pursuing the SEE minor, you can take the course. We will discuss various environmental topics, but three are prominent: 1) how can we address global climate change; 2) what does sustainability mean; 3) in what ways do we imagine nature. We will read a combination of non-fiction and fiction. Students are also encouraged to simutaneously enroll in the SEE-LLC section of Philosophy 103.

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ENG-200H-S2, Sustainability, Energy, and the Environment

This course is connected to the Living and Learning Community for Sustainability, Energy and the Environment (SEE). SEE is an interdisciplinary program at UD that offers a minor, and works closely with the Rivers Stewards, another environmental student program on campus. However, even if you are not part of the SEE Living and Learning Community, but you do have an interest in environmental issues, or pursuing the SEE minor, you can take the course. We will discuss various environmental topics, but three are prominent: 1) how can we address global climate change; 2) what does sustainability mean; 3) in what ways do we imagine nature. We will read a combination of non-fiction and fiction. Students are also encouraged to simutaneously enroll in the SEE-LLC section of Philosophy 103.

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ENG-200H-W1, Voices & Visions

By examining social and cultural images, students will analyze the visual as it has become an integral part of rhetorical experiences.

In general, English 200H proposes to itself the departmental student outcomes:

  • Write about primary and secondary texts on the course them (Voices & Visions) in a manner that reflects the ability to read critically;
  • Engage in a process approach to writing college-level prose;
  • Produce rhetorically effective college-level expository prose;
  • Produce well researched academic arguments and appeals that are documented in accordance with the MLA style manual;
  • Examine one topic from at least three disciplinary perspectives (two of which are in the Humanities Commons);
  • Examine one topic with attention to difference such as class, gender, race, sexuality, or religion;
  • Explore the relevance of the Catholic intellectual tradition fro the study of reading, writing, and rhetoric as human endeavors.

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