Music

With a solid foundation of broad-based knowledge in the liberal arts, along with a focus in music courses, our music major will give you the ability and flexibility to pursue all of your interests and prepare for your career.

Program Overview

The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a major in music provides a liberal arts education with an emphasis on music courses. Many students combine this degree with a second major, allowing for a variety of career opportunities. There are three concentrations in the program: music studies , jazz studies and ethnomusicology.

If you pursue the B.A. with a major in music, you will also complete a language requirement. You may satisfy the requirement by taking a proficiency examination, completing an intermediate-level language course or participating in an approved education abroad experience.

The Department of Music is a fully accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Music.

Ethnomusicology Concentration

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music (MUS) with a concentration in Ethnomusicology focuses on the diversity of the world’s musical traditions. Students will participate in both the Western European classical music tradition (in private lessons and in choral or instrumental ensembles) and in musics from across the globe, including Black gospel, Javanese gamelan, American jazz and African choral singing. They will study European music theory in addition to transcription of unwritten musics. They will learn to analyze music in culture by studying anthropology as well, and will ultimately complete a minor in Anthropology. Students will conduct ethnographic fieldwork in order to become conversant with the essential research methods of ethnomusicology and anthropology, and during their senior year will complete a two-semester capstone project based on their fieldwork. To take advantage of the diverse academic environment at the University of Dayton, students are encouraged to complete a second major within another discipline.

Jazz Studies Concentration

The B.A. with a concentration in jazz studies is a program that focuses on the musical and historical elements of jazz. You will study jazz improvisation, jazz theory, jazz history, and jazz composition and arranging, in addition to core studies in music theory, aural skills and functional keyboard. You will also receive weekly jazz lessons in your area of expertise each semester. In addition, you are expected to perform in one of three jazz ensembles and one of the many faculty-coached combos.

The first year of academic preparation is similar to music majors in other music degree programs, as you will take classes theory and aural skills, in addition to other general education and music courses required for your degree. During the second year of study, you will begin studies in improvisation. You can also expect to take courses in jazz history and arranging as part of the curriculum.

An important component of the B.A. in music with a jazz studies concentration is a jazz-related senior capstone research project developed in conjunction with the your adviser and the coordinator of jazz studies. This project can take the form of a major recital, a written jazz composition or arrangement, or a full concert or other jazz related activity or project. You will work closely with a jazz faculty adviser to plan, organize and complete your project.

Music Studies Concentration

Our program provides a strong grounding in the liberal arts while emphasizing music courses. Coursework and hands-on opportunities allow you to grow as a musician while providing the skills you need to work with others in this diverse field.

As part of the curriculum, you will be exposed to music from all eras and all parts of the world, including gospel, jazz, popular music and world music. You will be encouraged to learn from music of the past and explore the possibilities inherent in the music of the present and future as you develop aesthetic, creative, critical and intellectual music skills.

Academic Requirements

Program requirements can be found in the online Catalog. Simply select the area of study and click "Explore".