Albert Burky

Professor
Full-Time Faculty
College of Arts and Sciences: Biology

Profile

Dr. Albert Burky is a professor in the Department of Biology. His areas of research include the physiological adaptations and energetics of natural populations of snails, clams, crustaceans and fish. His experimental approach involves measurements of growth, reproduction, and metabolism, and the assessment of energy strategies in relation to environmental conditions. His most recent research has involved the application of micro-flow meters to analyses of habitat utilization of aquatic fish and invertebrates in streams of Ohio and in rainforest mountain streams of the islands of Maui and Hawaii.

Recent Publications

Harding, J.M., Burky A.J., Way C.M. (1998) "Habitat preferences of the rainbow darter, Etheostoma caeruleum, with regard to microhabitat velocity shelters." Copia. In press.

Way, C.M., Burky A.J., Harding J.M., Hau S., Puleloa W.K.L.C. (1998) "Reproductive biology of the endemic goby, Lentipes concolor, from Makamaka'ole stream, Maui and Waikolu stream, Moloka'i." Environmental Biology of Fishes. 51:53-65.

Way, C.M., A.J. Burky, C.R. Bingham, and A.C. Miller (1995). "Substrate roughness, velocity refuges, and macroinvertebrate abundance on artificial substrates in the lower Mississippi River." J. NABS 14: In press.

Way, C.M., A.J. Burky, and M.T. Lee (1993). "The relationship between shell morphology and microhabitat flow in the endemic Hawaiian stream limpet (Hihiwai), Neritina granosa (Prosobranchia: Neritidae)." Pacific Science 47:263-275.

Burky, A.J., D.J. Hornbach, and C.M. Way (1985). "Comparative bioenergetics of permanent and temporary pond populations of the freshwater clam (Say), Musculium partumeium." Hydrobiologia 126:35-48.