Bill Trollinger

Professor; Director of Core Integrated Studies Program
Full-Time Faculty
College of Arts and Sciences: History, Religious Studies, Core

Profile

Dr. Trollinger graduated with a B.A. in English and History from Bethel College (MN) in 1977. He then attended the University of Wisconsin (Madison) where he completed a Ph.D. in U.S. History, with a focus on 20th-century American fundamentalism. Prior to coming to the University of Dayton in the fall of 1996 he was an assistant professor of history at the College of the Ozarks and Messiah College. He has written extensively on American evangelicalism and fundamentalism, Protestant print culture, and the death penalty in the U.S. He served as director of the Religious Studies Graduate Program from January 2008 to July 2009 and currently teaches courses for the Departments of History and Religious Studies. Dr. Trollinger is currently the Director of the Core Integrated Studies Program.

Selected Publications

Righting America at the Creation Museum: Young Earth Creationism and the Culture Wars. With Susan Trollinger. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, forthcoming.

"Evangelicalism and Religious Pluralism in Contemporary America: Diversity Without, Diversity Within, and Maintaining the Borders." Religious Pluralism in the United States, 1945 - Present, eds. Charles Cohen and Ronald Numbers. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013.

“Hearing the Silence: The University of Dayton, the Ku Klux Klan, and Catholic Universities and Colleges in the 1920s.” American Catholic Studies, 124(Spring 2013).

"An Outpouring of 'Faithful' Words: Protestant Publishing in the United States, 1880-1945." Print in Motion: The Expansion of Publishing and Reading in the United States, 1880-1940, eds. Carl Kaestle and Janice Radway. Vol. IV: History of the Book in America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009.

"Reports from Fundamentalism's Front Lines: The Pilot and Its Correspondents, 1920-1947." Religion and the Culture of Print, eds. Charles Cohen and Paul Boyer. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2008.