Samuel Dorf

Assistant Professor of Musicology; Early Music Ensemble
Full-Time Faculty
College of Arts and Sciences: Music

  • Location: CPC 461
  • Phone: 937-229-3986
  • Email: Contact

Direct Email

sdorf1@udayton.edu

Profile

Samuel N. Dorf received a Ph.D. in historical musicology from Northwestern University in 2009 upon the completion of his dissertation titled "Listening between the Classical and the Sensual: Neoclassicism in Parisian Music and Dance Culture, 1870-1935."

Dr. Dorf has published articles dealing with the performance and reinvention of ancient Greek music and dance in fin-de-siècle Paris, queer music reception, and film music, and has presented papers at history, queer studies, dance history, archaeology, and musicology conferences throughout North America and Europe. His research areas include intersections between musicology and the history of technology, reception studies, queer studies, film studies, and the history of performance practice. He has won awards, grants and fellowships from Northwestern University, Harvard University, the Society of Dance History Scholars, and the American Musicological Society.

Degrees

  • Ph.D., Northwestern University, 2009
  • M.A. Tufts University, 2004
  • B.A., B.Mus, Boston University, 2002

Selected Publications

"Dancing Greek Antiquity in Public and Private: Isadora Duncan's Early Patronage in Paris." Dance Research Journal 44, no. 1 (2012): 2-27.

Book review of Nijinsky's Bloomsbury Ballet: Reconstruction of the Dance & Design for Jeux, by Millicent Hodson (Hillsdale, NY: Pendragon Press, 2010) and Stravinsky's Pulcinella: A Facsimile of the Sources and Sketches, by Maureen A. Carr (Middletown, WI: A-R Editions, 2008), inThe Journal of the American Musicological Society 65, no. 1 (Spring, 2012): 276-288. 
   
"Seeing Sappho in Paris: Operatic and Choreographic Adaptations of Sapphic Lives and Myths." Music and Art: International Journal for Music Iconography 38 (2009): 289-308.

"Étrange n'est-ce pas? The Princesse Edmond de Polignac, Erik Satie's Socrate, and a Lesbian Aesthetic of Music?" French Literature Series 34 (2007): 87-99.