Events by Date

Created Equal events will be held during February 2014, which is celebrated as Black History Month, and the first week of March. Browse the Created Equal events by week.

Feb. 1 - 7

Film Screening: The Abolitionists

The Abolitionists vividly brings to life the struggles of the men and women who led the battle to end slavery.

Due to the length of The Abolitionists, it will be shown in three parts at Dayton Metro Library:

part 1: Monday, Feb. 3 6:30 p.m. Dayton Metro Library Main Auditorium

part 2: Tuesday, Feb. 4 6:30 p.m. Dayton Metro Library Main Auditorium - CANCELED

part 3: Thursday, Feb. 6 6:30 p.m. Dayton Metro Library Main Auditorium

Entire film:

Friday, Feb. 7 11:30 a.m. Roesch Library First Floor FlexSpace. Visitors must stop at the main visitor's booth on College Park Drive and ask for a "Created Equal" event parking pass.

Friday, Feb. 7 8 p.m. University of Dayton ArtStreet Studio B. 

Lecture @ Lunch 

LTC Forum, ground floor of Roesch Library. Participants are invited to bring their own lunch. Beverages and dessert will be provided. Seating is limited to 30, so registration is required. Visitors must stop at the main visitor's booth on College Park Drive and ask for a "Created Equal" event parking pass.

Feb. 6 noon to 1 p.m.: "What are Civil Rights?: A History and a Practice of Social Justice Work in the U.S. Pre-Brown vs. Board”

Presented by Dr. Caroline Merithew

During the 1920s and 1930s, decades before activists in the African-American Freedom struggle chose to underscore the movement's relationship between the notion of civil rights and emancipation, there was another movement for Civil Rights.

This talk looks at the story of "The Other Civil Rights Movement" in order to better understand the links between the "Old" and the "New" Civil Rights movement. In addition to rethinking the periodization of a Civil Rights movement in U.S. history, Dr. Merithew also explores the relationship between civil rights and human rights -- a concern that is part of recent scholarship in the field -- and asks whether a fight for individual rights undermines what is so important to social justice claims and communitarian values.

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Feb. 8 - 14

Discussion: The Abolitionists

February 11, 2014 7 p.m. Facilitated discussion of The Abolitionists. Marianist Hall Studio 218, led by Dr. Jack Ling. Visitors must stop at the parking booth off of Founders Lane and ask for a "Created Equal" event parking pass.

Workshop: "Buses, Water Fountains and Lunch Counters: What Do You Know About Jim Crow (And Who Cares in 2014?)"

Wednesday, Feb. 12 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. University of Dayton ArtStreet Studio E, Workshop by Dr. Leslie Picca and Dr. Ruth Thompson-Miller.  Registration required.

We'll examine the contemporary images of American life after slavery ended and before the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, and how these images compare to reality. We'll also explore how this moment in history impacts every single one of us today.

Dr. Ruth Thompson-Miller is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Dr. Leslie Picca is an Associate Professor of Sociology. They have numerous articles written together on racial relations, and are the authors of an upcoming book on Segregation Stress Syndrome (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers).

Film Screening: Slavery by Another Name

Slavery by Another Name is about the huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted until World War II.

Thursday, Feb. 13: 6:30 p.m. Rosewood Arts Centre gallery: This program is supported in part by Rosewood Arts Centre, a division of the City of Kettering's Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts department.

Friday, Feb. 14: 11:30 a.m. Roesch Library First Floor FlexSpace. Visitors must stop at the main visitor's booth on College Park Drive and ask for a "Created Equal" event parking pass.

Friday, Feb. 14: 8 p.m. University of Dayton ArtStreet Studio B

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Feb. 15 - Feb. 24

Discussion: Slavery by Another Name

February 18, 2014 7 p.m. ArtStreet Studio B: Facilitated discussion of the film Slavery by Another Name, led by Dr. Verb Washington. 

Film Screenings: Freedom Riders

Freedom Riders tells the story of the Civil Rights Movement interstate busing protest campaign.

Friday, Feb. 21: 11:30 a.m. Roesch Library First Floor FlexSpace. Co-sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs. Visitors must stop at the main visitor's booth on College Park Drive and ask for a "Created Equal" event parking pass.

Friday, Feb. 21: 8 p.m. University of Dayton ArtStreet Studio B

Monday, Feb. 24: 6:30 p.m. Rosewood Arts Centre gallery: This program is supported in part by Rosewood Arts Centre, a division of the City of Kettering's Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts department.

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Feb. 25 - March 4

Discussion: Freedom Riders

February 25, 7 p.m. Marianist Hall Studio 218: Facilitated discussion of film and book Freedom Riders, led by Dr. Thomas Morgan. A limited number of copies of the book are available to participants to read before the discussion. Contact Carlos Stewart at cstewart1@udayton.edu to reserve a copy. This event is co-sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs. Visitors must stop at the parking booth off of Founders Lane and ask for a "Created Equal" event parking pass.

Community Panel Discussion

Feb. 27: 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sears Recital Hall

Panel moderator: Kathleen Henderson

Join us as community leaders from the Dayton Africana Elders Council share with us stories and reflections of their work within the community to address social justice and civil rights issues over the years. The panelists will engage in a lively discussion with the audience to identify current social justice struggles in our community, and challenge us to think of ways to build community to achieve positive change.

Sears Recital Hall is a 183-seat facility located on the first floor of the Jesse Philips Humanities Center. After 6:30 p.m. visitors may park in Lot C without a permit for this event. This is a free event and seating is limited. Plan to arrive early. 

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Film Screenings: The Loving Story

A racially-charged criminal trial and a heart-rending love story converge in this documentary about Richard and Mildred Loving, set during the turbulent Civil Rights era.

Friday, Feb. 28: 11:30 a.m. Roesch Library First Floor FlexSpace. Visitors must stop at the main visitor's booth on College Park Drive and ask for a "Created Equal" event parking pass.

Friday, Feb. 28: 8 p.m. University of Dayton ArtStreet Studio B

Monday, March 3: 6:30 p.m. Rosewood Arts Centre gallery: This program is supported in part by Rosewood Arts Centre, a division of the City of Kettering's Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts department.

Discussion: The Loving Story

March 4: 7 p.m. Marianist Hall Studio 218: Facilitated discussion of the film The Loving Story, led by Dr. Patricia Reid. Visitors must stop at the parking booth off of Founders Lane and ask for a "Created Equal" event parking pass.

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Scholar Bios

Jack T.F. Ling, Ph.D.
Executive Director, Institutional Diversity and inclusion, Office of the Provost
Jack Ling, Ph.D. is Chinese-American. He received a joint doctorate degree in Clinical and Social Psychology, and did graduate work in Philosophy of Science, and Campus and Civil Rights Law. He was a professor in psychology (Boston University), a dean of students (Pitzer College), and an associate dean of graduate school (Lesley University).

Caroline Merithew, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of History
Dr. Merithew is an associate professor of History at the University of Dayton Her work emphasizes the intersections of class, gender, and race in US History. Her publications include "Domesticating the Diaspora: Remembering the Life of Katie DeRorre, in Intimacy and Italian Migration: Gender and Domestic Lives in a Mobile World, "Lynch-Law Must Go!" in the Journal of American Ethnic History," Anarchist Motherhood," in Women, Gender, and Transnational Lives , "Making the Italian Other," in Are Italians White?, and "We Were Not Ladies: Gender Class, and a Women's Auxiliary's Battle for Mining Unionism" in the Journal of Women's History, which was awarded the Anita S. Goodstein Junior Scholar Prize in Women's History from Sewanee, the University of the South. Dr. Merithew taught at Cornell University before coming to the University of Dayton.

Thomas L. Morgan, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of English
My teaching interests are in African American and American literature, particularly the way race is represented in literature. My research focuses on the politics of narrative form in late-nineteenth-century American literature, combining Critical Race Theory with Narrative Theory, Cultural Studies, and Literary History to triangulate the contentious relationships existing between authors, editors, and readers. Currently, I am examining the connections between metaphor and race in late nineteenth century American literature, examining the ways language and cognition influence the interactions between different racial and cultural groups. I have published on Paul Laurence Dunbar, Kate Chopin, Stephen Crane, James Weldon Johnson, and Richard Wright, as well as editing The Complete Stories of Paul Laurence Dunbar with Gene Andrew Jarrett.

Leslie H. Picca, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work
Leslie Picca, Ph.D., teaches sociology courses on race, sexuality, and bodies. She is co-author of the book Two Faced Racism: Whites in the Backstage and Frontstage (Routledge, 2007 with Joe Feagin). Her research on racial relations has been nationally recognized, and she has been interviewed by CNN, the Associated Press, Congressional Quarterly, Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, the Dayton Daily News, among others. She lives in Mason, Ohio with her spouse and three daughters (ages 8, 6, 4).

Patricia Reid, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of History
Dr. Reid's area of specialization is the social and legal history of African Americans before the Civil War. She also teaches the African American History survey (from African civilizations until the contemporary period) as well as other courses on Early America. She has published two articles in esteemed academic journals: the first one, "The Haitian Revolution, Black Petitioners and Refugee Widows, 1790-1820" in The American Journal of Legal History and "Margaret Morgan's Story: A Threshold Between Slavery and Freedom, 1820-1840" in Slavery and Abolition. She is currently working on a third, "Democracy in Retreat: Restricting Citizenship in Maryland's Early Republic, 1780-1810."

Verb Washington, Ph.D.
Lecturer, Department of History
Dr. Washington's primary research interest is in the African American military experience. He joined the faculty at the University of Dayton in 2010, after retiring from a 30 year career in the US Army. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from the US Military Academy at West Point, and both his M.A. and Ph.D. from the Ohio State University. His 1995 dissertation entitled "Eagles on Their Buttons: The Fifth Regiment of Infantry, United States Colored Troops in The American Civil War," concerns the recruitment, experience, and societal reintegration of black soldiers in the American Civil War, and was published as Eagles on Their Buttons by the University of Missouri Press in 1999.

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