Spring 2014 FES sessions

Click here to register for the Spring 2014 FES sessions


Why Do Students Leave UD? 

Hosted by: Student Success and Persistence Team

Date/Location: Monday, February 3, 2014 / 12:00 to 1:15pm

LTC Forum, lunch provided

Why are students leaving UD?  As a faculty person, it is easy to imagine lack of academic success can be a reason to leave.   But some students have proven to be very successful at UD and are still leaving—why?  Come to this session and share with us your insight, experience and perspectives.  The Student Success and Persistence Team will be on hand to provide data on student retention and withdrawal as we listen to your interpretation and insights.


Global Education Seminar, South America

Facilitated by: Faculty participants from cohort 3 (2012-13) Julius Amin, Treavor Bogard & Susan Wawrose

Friday, February 7 / 12:00-1:15 P.M.

LTC Forum, lunch provided

Faculty engagement plays an essential role in the successful internationalization of a university. Participants in the third year of the Global Education Seminar: South America will share their experiences in the program. They will discuss the impact of the program, including sessions on campus and in Argentina and Peru, on their professional and personal development, and their relationships with other faculty at UD, as well as their understanding of their roles in the internationalization of the university.

The Global Education Seminar serves as a key element for supporting academic units’ strategic plans for internationalization by broadening the pedagogical and scholarly horizons of faculty members. The program provides faculty with concrete, site-specific resources and relationships that can motivate and shape revision of the courses they teach, as well as inform additional international collaborations.


Making Electronic Documents Accessible Quickly and Easily

Hosted by: Deanna Arbuckle, Elizabeth Harrison and Kelly Warren (Office of Learning Resources)

Date/Location: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 / 12:00-1:15pm

LTC Forum, lunch provided

The LTC’s Office of Learning Resources is making the SensusAccess file conversion system available to the UD community through a web link. SensusAccess will convert an uploaded file from a variety of formats that contain text into accessible audio, braille, e-book, text, word and pdf formats. Learn how to use SensusAccess (it’s easy and almost instantaneous) and how to make good format choices for your documents’ audiences—the goal is to make the documents you post more accessible to a wide variety of users.


Increasing Student Performance and Engagement Through the Use of Formative and Summative Assessment Strategies

Hosted by: Tess Rivero (Mathematics)

Date/Location: Thursday, February 13, 2014 / 4:00-5:00pm

LTC Forum, refreshments provided

Participants will learn how to increase student achievement by varying formative assessment strategies.  Also, participants will examine student work (theirs and others) to better structure formative and summative assessments.  Please bring copies of student work and the corresponding assessments.


Global Education Seminar, South America

Facilitated by: Faculty participants from cohort 3 (2012-13) Tereza Szeghi Dempster, Umesh Haritashya & Ernesto Velasquez

Monday, February 17 / 12:00-1:15 P.M

LTC Forum, lunch provided

Faculty engagement plays an essential role in the successful internationalization of a university. Participants in the third year of the Global Education Seminar: South America will share their experiences in the program. They will discuss the impact of the program, including sessions on campus and in Argentina and Peru, on their professional and personal development, and their relationships with other faculty at UD, as well as their understanding of their roles in the internationalization of the university.

The Global Education Seminar serves as a key element for supporting academic units’ strategic plans for internationalization by broadening the pedagogical and scholarly horizons of faculty members. The program provides faculty with concrete, site-specific resources and relationships that can motivate and shape revision of the courses they teach, as well as inform additional international collaborations.


Explore WYNN Literacy: Software that Can Read Aloud to You and Your Students

Hosted by: Deanna Arbuckle, Elizabeth Harrison and Kelly Warren (Office of Learning Resources)

Date/Location: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 / 12:00-1:15pm

LTC Forum, lunch provided

WYNN Literacy Software will read aloud any electronic text opened in the program while allowing the listener to follow the text as it is read. It also includes numerous study and learning aids. The LTC’s Office of Learning Resources (OLR) is bringing WYNN to the UD community free of charge so that we can more easily make text resources accessible to a wide variety of readers—students and others with disabilities, English language learners, anyone who would benefit from listening to text or would like to engage with a text in a different way. This session will introduce WYNN and ask participants to brainstorm with each other ways that it can be used to support learning.


Trying to Understand and Use Nonverbal Communication in the Teaching and Learning Process

Hosted by: Sam Wallace and Jon Hess (Communication)

Date/Location: Monday, February 24, 2014 / 12:00-1:15pm

LTC Forum, lunch provided

Recent research and teaching experiences indicate some connections with nonverbal communication behaviors and understanding our current students as well as provide some insight on improving student learning. However, many questions remain unanswered (and unasked)! This FES will provide a brief summary of some of the relevant issues, provide the opportunity to talk about experiences and frustrations, and attempt to identify potential questions for further investigation.


Integrating a Catholic, Marianist Approach to the Environment and Exploring MEEC as a Resource

Hosted by: Leanne Jablonski, FMI (Marianist Environmental Education Center)

Date/Location: Wednesday, February 26, 2014 / 12:00-1:15pm

LTC Forum, lunch provided

A brief overview of Catholic, Marianist and other diverse faith community engagement in earth stewardship and environmental justice and spirituality.  Interactive dialogue on how connecting to the natural environment and responding to sustainability issues is personally important to faculty. Idea sharing of a Catholic and Marianist approach in view of Pope Francis and contemporary environmental issues and how the 100-acre Marianist Environmental Education Center at Mount St. John (http//meec.udayton.edu) might be of greater service to UD faculty for personal integration, teaching, scholarship and service.


Communication, Conversation, Dialogue – How Can We Make Consultation More Effective?

Hosted by: Joseph Saliba (Provost), Carolyn Phelps (Psychology / President Academic Senate), and Jonathan Hess (Communication)

Date/Location: Friday, February 28, 2014 / 12:00 to 1:15pm

KU 331, lunch provided

According to the Constitution of the Academic Senate, consultation is defined as “an exchange of information with the Academic Senate for the purpose of permitting the Academic Senate to propose or to comment upon policies which are other than academic and educational.”  This session, facilitated by Provost Joe Saliba, Carolyn Roecker Phelps, President of the Academic Senate, and Jon Hess, former President of the Academic Senate and chair of the Department of Communication will focus on steps currently being taken to improve consultation with the Senate and the development of ideas to further develop that important work.


What if Community Engaged Learning was Part of Your Course, Program, or Student Internship?

Hosted by: Kelly Bohrer (Fitz Center for Leadership in Community)

Date/Location: March 3, 2014 / 12:00-1:15pm

LTC Forum, lunch provided

Community Engaged Learning (CEL) is a learning strategy that integrates disciplinary knowledge in actual community settings to achieve civic, personal, professional, and academic enrichment learning outcomes. It is also a strategy closely tied to our Catholic and Marianist identity of educating the whole student and having a commitment to the common good that transforms world views and shapes vocations and lives.  This workshop will present on the concept of CEL, what it is and is not, what it entails, and the resources and support for faculty here at UD interested in using CEL as a learning strategy.  Examples of CEL taking place in UD faculty courses will be shared to inspire new and enhanced ideas for your classroom, program, or internship program.  A straightforward method for documenting, generating, and assessing learning will also be shared with participants.  There will also be time for questions, candid conversation, and sharing hopes for the future of community engaged learning at UD.


Developing and Implementing a Flipped Classroom

Hosted by: Scott Segalewitz (Engineering Technology)

Date/Location: Thursday, March 20, 2014 / 12:00-1:15pm

LTC Forum, lunch provided

The flipped classroom model allows students to gain their first exposure to new material outside of class via video lectures and demonstrations, and then use class time to do the harder work of applying the knowledge.  This session will demonstrate how one course was transformed from the traditional delivery to a flipped classroom.  Participants will learn about some tools and techniques for flipping a classroom.  Also discussed will be benefits to students and faculty, and student assessment of the learning model.


Carnegie Community Engagement Classification: What it means for UD Faculty and Staff 

Hosted by: Kelly Bohrer, Dick Ferguson (Fitz Center for Leadership in Community) and Paul Vanderburgh (Associate Provost, Graduate Academic Affairs)

Date/Location: March 24, 2014 / 12:00-1:15pm

LTC Forum, lunch provided

The University of Dayton is in a year long process of completing our application for the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification which gives national recognition to community engaged institutions.  It involves data collection and documentation of important aspects of the institutional mission, identity and commitment as well as provides a process of self-assessment and quality improvement.  How is UD measuring up?  During this presentation and discussion we will share more about the classification, what “community engagement” looks like in light of Carnegie’s definition, and provide a report on details in our application.  Participants will learn about initiatives on campus, our strengths in engaging with the community, and areas in which we need to grow.  Facilitated discussion will share ideas and hopes for our desired future and specific ways we can realize the truest meaning of “community engagement” on our campus.


Maintaining High Standards in the Classroom

Hosted by: David Wright (LTC/UDit, Office of Curriculum Innovation and E-Learning) and Faculty Panel

Date/Location: Tuesday, April 1, 2014 / 12:00-1:15pm

LTC Forum, lunch provided

Academic standards are defined by accreditation bodies, our disciplinary and professional expectations and the personal values and aspirations of the teacher and the academy.  Although student expectations can be high, they may frequently fall short of a teacher’s expectations.  How does a teacher maintain a rigorous learning environment in which students are fully motivated and supported for success?  What behaviors should faculty communicate and model to build student trust and commitment?  This panel discussion will include a rich dialogue with participants to uncover best practices in setting and maintaining an appropriately challenging classroom environment while addressing learning needs of all students.