Office of Learning Resources | OLR - Your Partner in Learning

We know a lot about learning these days. We know it happens both inside and outside the classroom, in formal and informal, individual and group settings, and in different ways for different people.  We know that learning is influenced by attitude and motivation, by pedagogy, by environment (space, time, lighting, sound), by learning habits and preferences.

The Ryan C. Harris Learning Teaching Center's Office of Learning Resources is a learning resource for students, parents, faculty,and staff at the University of Dayton.  OLR offers a wide variety of information and services to help everyone become a successful learner. Peruse the web site, attend one of our offerings, or contact our office and meet with a staff member -- however you look at it, OLR is your partner in learning!


Learn to learn, live, and work together.  For real.

The University of Dayton's Marianist focus on learning and living together provides everyone at UD the opportunity to learn how to live and work effectively in our increasingly diverse, global society. Take advantage of the many ways you can learn from and with people different from yourself!


Accessibility.  It's what we're all about.

The OLR website is designed for ease of use. Most content can be accessed from the homepage tabs or with only one or two clicks. Pages with a good deal of content will have quick links at the top to lead to specific content areas. The pages and forms are screen reader friendly. Individual users can modify the view for easier reading by typing CTRL + to enlarge the font size (zoom in) or CTRL - to reduce the font size (zoom out).

Learning and Study Resources

Image of student studying

Learners come in all shapes and sizes.

Understanding your goals and knowing how you learn best can help you make good learning choices as you move through your college career and beyond.  The resources described on this website can help you learn more about yourself as a learner, develop or strengthen the skills you will need as you encounter more and more complex material, and make choices that are appropriate for yourself in any learning setting. So go ahead, dig in!


Featured Tip

Research suggests that exercise is the best thing you can do to improve your learning. In particular, 30 minutes of aerobic exercise a day, four to five days a week is the suggested for improving learning.


Featured Book

Did you know your brain is not hard-wired?  Physical changes occur in your brain when you learn because it is actually soft-wired.  Interested in learning more about your brain?  Read John B. Arden's Rewire Your Brain, Think Your Way to a Better Life

Featured Video



To watch this video with captions, click on the CC button.  Please note, YouTube Translations is still in beta testing.

Follow the links below for information about the resources offered:


Academic Coaching and Student Consultations
ARCC | Academic Renewal Course and Coaching Program
FIRST| Fully Integrated Resource Support and Transition Program
Study Resources
Supplemental Instruction
Transition to College
Tutoring by Appointment
Walk-In Tutoring  

Looking for global learning support?  Click on our new tab for International Student Resources. 



Academic Coaching and Consultations

Image of a conversation bubbleWe are happy to meet with you to discuss academic goals and current course progress, to help motivate you toward success, and to provide information about a variety of study skills. Our professional staff are available to meet with you in single or multiple sessions if requested.  Referrals to campus and community resources will be made when appropriate and informal disability screenings are offered.

To request an appointment please complete our online consultation form.  We can also match you with a trained peer academic coach.  Let us know if you are interested in being matched with a peer when you complete the online consultations form.
Complete our consultation form now >>
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ARCC | Academic Renewal Course and Coaching Program

Interested in learning more about learning? This one (1) credit, seven-week learning course (DEV 055) will help you enhance your current approaches to learning and studying. The course includes one-on-one academic coaching. Complete our inquiry form to reserve a seat or to learn more about the course. 
Complete our ARCC inquiry form now >>

What do students say about the course?

  • "I expected it to be a lecturing course where I was told what I did wrong and to not do it again but it was so much more than that, great class."
  • "I learned more efficient ways of approaching study habits. I learned to work on projects a little each day. I also learned better ways of approaching professors."
  • "I liked the end result of getting my act together!"

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FIRST | Fully Integrated Resource and Transition Program

Image of chapel The FIRST Program provides students with a total package of academic support integrated into their regular schedule of courses.  Participation in FIRST is offered free of additional charge to a small number of students whose academic profile and experience suggest that they will benefit from a structured transition to college. In accepting admission to the University of Dayton, all FIRST students and their parents/guardians sign a contract indicating their understanding of the expectations for participants in the program. =
Read the FIRST Terms of Agreement with explanations (opens PDF) >>

FIRST students are enrolled in a course titled The Art & Science of Learning (UDI 175) in the fall semester. As the anchor for the program, this course is designed to engage students in discussion and activities that will enhance their learning and study skills.  Students will explore the intersection of research in neuroscience, psychology, and educational psychology with their own experience of and needs in learning. The course will ask students to synthesize what they’re learning from their UD experiences in classes, residence halls, and co-curricular activities with what they’re learning about themselves in this class. The goal of the course is to teach students meta-cognition skills that will help them become successful in college. The credit hours for this course apply toward the student’s total credit hours for graduation. The Art and Science of Learning was created by professional staff from OLR in ongoing collaboration with faculty from academic departments.

FIRST students also attend learning support sessions offered for several of the courses in which they are enrolled during their first semester. These are usually small group, activity-based sessions led by students who are trained as course facilitators. The FIRST Program is administered by OLR in collaboration with the Office of Admissions and the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Special thanks to the following faculty that contributed to the course design: Thomas Eggemeier, Ph.D., Psychology, Said Elhamri, Ph.D., Physics, and Michele M Welkener, Ph.D., Educational Leadership.
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Study Resources

The following resources are designed to help you improve your learning and enhance your academic performance at UD. Try strategies that you think will work for you. And remember that you need to adapt any new strategy to meet your particular needs and practice it over a period of time in order to figure out whether it is helping you. If it isn't, try another.

Assessments

If you want to learn more about your learning preferences, try these free assessments.
Discovery Wheel >>
Learning Styles Online >>
Study Space Assessment (opens a PDF file) >>
Visual Aural Read/Write and Kinesthetic (VARK) Assessment >>

Learning Tools

Check out our helpful learning strategies and resources that may enhance your academic success.
Explore applications (apps) for mobile technology >>
Explore free learning technologies >>
Explore study skills resources to enhance your learning >>

Grade Point Average Calculator

DegreeWorks offers a useful GPA Calculator to help you determine what grades you need to achieve your academic goals.
Log on to Porches now to use DegreeWorks >>
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Supplemental Instruction

Image of group of peopleDid you know that research suggest that group study is most effective for most learners?  If you are enrolled in a class that offers Supplemental Instruction (SI), your class will have an SI Leader - a peer facilitator, who holds two weekly scheduled review sessions outside of class hours for you and other students in your class. Your SI Leader will attend your class every day, so she or he will know exactly what your professor is telling you and asking you to learn.  Research also tells us that attending a SI session is roughly the equivalent of studying 2.5 hours alone.*

SI review sessions are times to work collaboratively with your SI Leader and the other students in your class to solidify your understanding of class material. You might work with others to compare and complete your notes from class, prepare together for an upcoming test, practice solving problems like those your instructor is introducing, or draw concept maps to help you organize and learn new material from class.

 What are students saying about SI?
  • “SI helps to reiterate what I’ve learned in class, and makes details that I may not have caught on my own more memorable.”
  • “SI helped me to better understand the material we went over in class, we looked at the material from a different perspective and went over the notes to prepare for the exam and class. “
  • "SI was very helpful. We repeated material more thoroughly and played games to make learning interesting."

View the learning support guide now >>
Learn more about becoming a SI Leader now >>
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*John, D. W., Johnson, R. T., & Smith, K. A. (1991).  Cooperative learning: Increasing college faculty instructional productivity (ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 4)  Washington, DC:  George Washington University.



Transition to College

A transition means passing from one state or place to another. In this case, you are transitioning from one academic experience to the UD. For most students college is very different, and living away from your family (if that's what you're going to do) may also be something new for you. Gearing up for this change can help you feel better prepared and help you adjust more quickly once you arrive on campus. Our office encourages you and your parents/guardians to explore the following resources about the pre-admission process as preparation for a smooth transition to college.

The University of Dayton gives balanced consideration to all aspects of a student's college preparation. While no minimum grade point average, class rank or standardized test score is specified, these measures must provide evidence of the applicant's readiness for college studies in their chosen academic program.
Learn more about admission to UD >>

Be prepared for your college admission test. If you are concerned about taking your college admission test, be sure to explore the resources available to you before you take your exam. The are numerous test-prep guides and practice exams to help you prepare for college admissions tests. Check out resources available in your community or on the web. Here are a few resources to get you going.

Learn more about ACT prep on the ACT, Inc. website >>
Learn more about ACT prep on the Kaplan website >> 
Learn more about ACT prep on with Sylvan Learning website >>
Learn more about ACT prep on the Study Tips website >> 
Learn more about ACT prep on the Spark Notes website >> 

Carefully consider what to include in your personal statement. The University of Dayton application asks applicants to write a personal statement. This is your opportunity to say whatever you feel you need to say about yourself. For example, you can talk about your character, your achievements or your dreams. In addition, if you feel your high school performance was adversely affected by unique circumstances, you may want to provide additional information about this in your personal statement. Get connected on campus early. Getting connected with the resources at the University of Dayton is an important step. Here is a list of tips that will help you get connected.

  • Make personal contact with an Admission Counselor. 
  • Arrange to make a daytime or overnight visit. Talk to students, faculty and staff during your visit to campus. 
  • Make personal contact or arrange appointments with offices of particular interest and ask plenty of questions.

Explore more the Transition Year Organization's website >>
Explore more about transition resources on the College Board website >>
Learn more about transition to college on the Family Education website >> 
Review our tips for registrations (opens PDF) >>
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Walk-In Tutoring

Image of two people working togetherFree tutoring is available for many entry-level courses and some upper-level classes. If you attend Walk-In Tutoring, you will work individually or in small groups with a Tutor. Walk-In Tutoring takes place in different locations across campus. These spaces are warm, inviting, and accessible for all learners. When you arrive at Walk-In Tutoring, you will be greeted by one of our friendly Customer Service Assistants who will make sure you get connected with an appropriate Tutor. Bi-lingual Tutors are available on designated evenings. 

What are students saying about tutoring?

  • "They all worked as a team to help me understand what the problem was asking before they helped me solve it."
  • "He didn't’t just do the problem for me, he showed me helpful tricks and his strategy for solving problems."
  • "He must have used magic because I completely understand everything. I was stressed out thinking I was going to fail my final, but now I’m going to get a 100%!!"
Learn more about what to expect and what to do to prepare for tutoring on campus >>

View the learning support guide now >>
Learn more about becoming a Tutor >>
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Tutoring by Appointment

Language tutoring by appointment is available for Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Latin, and Spanish during the Fall and Spring semesters.  If you are currently enrolled in one of these language courses and are interested in scheduling a tutoring session, you can complete our online request form.  We are unable to guarantee that a tutor can be found for each requested and approved course. 
Complete a tutor request form now for your language course >>

Scheduled tutoring appointments may be requested by registered and pre-approved students with disabilities and student athletes.  Approvals for these requests are determined by our office. We are unable to guarantee that a Tutor can be found for each requested and approved course. 
Complete a tutor request form now for students with disabilities >>

All current student athletes have the ability to schedule tutoring by appointment through Tutor Trac. This form should only be completed if a Tutor is not listed for a specific course in Tutor Trac. Approvals for these requests are determined by the Office of Academic Services for Student Athletes (OASSA).
Complete a tutor request form now for student athletes  >>

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Disability Resources

Class outside

Recognizing disabilities.  Enhancing possibilities.

Learn about how you can access programs and services such as academic, housing and testing accommodations; individual consultations; on-going disability management; and course materials in alternative formats. The goal of Services for Students with Disabilities is to provide all students with equitable opportunity to participate freely and actively in all facets of university life. 

Read through the entries below in order or use the alphabetical list of links to find information about specific issues and services.  Be sure to check out our learning and study resources tab too. 

Follow the links below for information about the resources offered:

Accommodation Letters
Accommodation Process
Alternative Formats
Alternative Testing
Confidentiality
Course Substitution
Disability Student Handbook
Non-Academic Accommodations
Ryan C. Harris Adaptive Learning Lab
School of Law Students
Study Abroad
Resources (Additional)
Transition for Students with Disabilities
University of Dayton Policies
Volunteer Note Taking


Interactive Accommodations Discussion

The Office of Learning Resources (OLR) asks students who wish to make an official request for disability accommodations to contact us to discuss the barriers they anticipate or are facing and the kinds of accommodations that may be appropriate while attending classes and participating in community life at the University of Dayton.

OLR has established an interactive process that will enable us to work together to determine reasonable accommodations. To do this, we need information on how your condition is likely to impact you here at the University of Dayton--in the classroom, laboratory, testing, and community living learning environments. Here are some things you might want to think about prior to our discussion:

  • What tools or strategies facilitate your access? 
  • What accommodations, auxiliary aids, assistive technology, and/or services do you currently use or have you used in the past? How effective are they as tools for access?
  • What barriers do you anticipate at the university?  
  • If your condition is variable, has known triggers, or has medication side effects, what accommodations do these suggest? 

As we work with you to examine the reasonableness of the accommodations you have requested, we will look at your request in relation to your disability or condition and the essential elements of the course, program, or services involved.  In addition to your own report, OLR may request external documentation to support your request for specific accommodations. Reports from school systems, doctors, and other professionals; records of past accommodations and services; or results from diagnostic procedures/assessments may clarify how your condition impacts your learning and living on campus, and thus the connection between your disability or condition and your accommodation request.
Learn more about the interactive process >>
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Non-Academic Accommodations

Students with disabilities may require reasonable accommodations outside of the classroom setting. Residential Life, Parking Services, Dining Services and student programs represent types of non-academic settings where reasonable accommodations may be necessary. 

For housing and dining accommodations associated with a medical condition or disability, students should review the information available on the Department of Residence Life website.  OLR is a member of the Housing Committee and will assist, when necessary, in determining reasonable accommodations in the residential environment. 
Visit Department of Residence Life website >>

For parking parking accommodations, you need to communicate your needs directly with Parking Services.
Visit Parking Services website >>
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School of Law Students

School of Law Admissions considers an applicant with a disability in the same manner as any other applicant. There is no separate admissions’ application process for a student with a disability.

The procedure for documenting a disability and requesting an accommodation is set out in the School of Law’s Policy for Students with Disabilities, Appendix F-1. Students with disabilities who request reasonable accommodations must make those needs known to the School of Law’s Dean of Students and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs as soon as possible. Only students who seek reasonable accommodations for their disabilities need to make their disabilities known.  School of Law utilizes the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) disability guidelines when determining eligibility for academic accommodations.  Learn more about Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) now >>

It is the responsibility of the student to make their request known in a timely manner consistent with this policy statement. Students must provide appropriate documentation and evaluations of the disability and need for accommodations to OLR.

The UD School of Law utilizes consultation services from OLR. Our Disability Staff member reviews the disability verification, meets with the prospective or current School of Law Students and renders a disability verification decision to the School of Law’s Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the Dean of Students. The School of Law implements reasonable accommodations following the determination of eligibility from OLR and the request for reasonable accommodations.
Learn more about School of Law Policies >>
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Confidentiality

Our office is dedicated to keeping all personal student information confidential and complies with the standards set by the Family Education Records and Privacy Act (FERPA), applicable federal and/or state law and university policy. Disability information will be maintained by our office in a secure environment.  In general, OLR will not discuss nor release information about a student's disability and information provided about the disability unless required by federal and/or state law and/or University policy and guidelines or with a Release of Information form signed by the student.
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Transition for Students with Disabilities

For students with disabilities, a big factor in their successful transition to post-secondary education is accurate knowledge about their disability and their rights /responsibilities.  Being aware of the differences in K-12 and college environments as well as the college level expectations can help better prepare you for a successful transition. Things that you should consider as a student with a disability:

  • Take a college admission test - We encourage you to review the guidelines for requesting accommodations on standardized tests such as the ACT and SAT.  Be sure to work with your guidance counselor to make these types of arrangements.
  • Consider what to include in your personal statement - Having a disability is not a consideration for admission to University of Dayton. The application to the University of Dayton has a place where applicants are asked to write a personal statement. If you feel your high school performance was adversely affected by special disability circumstances, you may want to provide additional information, e.g. the impact of your disability, in your personal statement for consideration by the Admissions Office.
  • Contact the disability services office - While exploring different colleges, it is recommended that you visit our campus and OLR. Many students coordinate these campus visits during their junior year. If you have already been accepted to the University of Dayton and need more specific information about receiving academic adjustments or other learning support services (e.g. tutoring or writing support), please scheduled an appointment as soon as possible.
  • Learn what to expect in college - The services you might receive at the University of Dayton may be quite different from what you received in high school due to the differences between secondary and post-secondary disability rights statues. The disability documentation that you provide is reviewed and a determination will be issued based on best practices, trained Disability Staff's professional judgment and disability statutes. Academic adjustments offered by OLR are based on the interactive process directly with you in conjunction with the disability documentation you provide.

Learn more about the Differences between K-12 and College-Level Services for Students with Disabilities >>
Read full article from Office of Civil Rights regarding Auxiliary Aides >>
For additional information read article on "Post-Secondary Education: Knowing your Rights and Responsibilities" from Wrights Law >>
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Accommodation Letters

The Accommodation Letter is a communication tool which provides a list of requested and approved academic accommodations.  This letter is requested by the student each term via an online form.  Students will meet with OLR staff during the first two terms in which they use accommodations and as needed.  Once the student receives their letters, they must speak with individual faculty to initiate the accommodations and determine the methods in which accommodations will be implemented.  Failure to do so may delay the start of accommodations.
Request Accommodation Letters >>

What is the process to secure Accommodation Letters each semester?

  • Students approved for academic accommodations must request Accommodation Letters each semester. This is completed via the online request form (see Request Accommodation Letter form).
  • The first part of the request process is to complete a customer services survey.
  • Once you have completed the survey, you will be taken to the Accommodation Letter request page. This page highlights common accommodations for which the student may be eligible. The student making the request identifies the accommodations they wish to utilize during that semester.
  • Once the request is submitted, an e-mail is generated to OLR staff with the requested items.  OLR will verify your requested accommodations and generate your letters. If you request an item for which you are not approved, this will be evaluated by our Disability Staff. If any requested items are not approved, the student will be advised in writing.  Students will be given the option to set up a meeting to discuss unapproved requested accommodations.
  • Once the Accommodation Letters are generated, the student will be sent an e-mail that forms are completed. If required, the email will advise students to meet with OLR.  After the second semester of use, students can choose to meet with Disability Staff or stop in the office to pick up the letters.
  • Students are responsible for delivering the Accommodation Letters directly to the identified professor to discuss and coordinate how the accommodations will be addressed. Accommodations must be discussed with your professor prior to implementation.  Failure to do so may result in a delay or denial of accommodations.  Accommodations are not retroactive. 
  • If something changes after you have received your Accommodation Letters, please contact OLR.

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Alternative Testing

Alternative Testing is an academic accommodation for eligible students with disabilities registered with OLR.  This accommodation provides students with equitable access in the testing environment.  Eligibility is determined on a case by case basis.  The type of accommodation provided is determined through one-on-one consultation during the intake meeting with OLR.  These accommodations will be outlined on your Accommodation Letter.  Test Accommodations may include extended time, assistive technology, Interpreters, etc. 

It is important for students to communicate with their faculty members before submitting their request for alternative testing as many faculty members will provide necessary accommodations for testing.  If the student and faculty agree to use the OLR Testing Center, the student can then request test accommodations via the online test request forms following established guidelines.

Request alternative testing for exams, tests, quizzes during the Semester >>
Request alternative testing for exams during finals week >>
Cancel an exam, test or quiz >>
Reschedule an exam, test or quiz (including final exams) >>

Learn more about Alternative Testing FAQs >>
Learn more about UD's Final Exam Policy >>
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Alternative Formats

Alternative Formats, also called e-text, is an academic accommodation for students with a print disability who are registered with OLR.  This accommodation provides electronic versions of course materials for use with text to speech, large print, Braille etc. Eligibility is determined on a case by case basis, and students must make requests for desired books each term.  Students are required to show proof of purchase before an alternative format can be delivered.

Our office will work with students regarding converting required course textbooks, journal articles, and other print materials. It is important for the student to understand that this is a time consuming process. While OLR strives for no more than 28-day turnaround time from the date material is available, it can take between 4 to 6 weeks for completion of typical college textbooks and 2 to 4 months for more complex materials.

Although requests are processed on a first come, first served basis; priority is given to students who have provided proof of purchase.  The earlier the request is received, the more time we have to determine availability and, if applicable, to secure the book from outside sources.  If outside sources are not available, OLR has to create an electronic copy in-house using the student's copy of the textbook.

Alternative Formats available from OLR include:

  • Braille
  • Electronic textbooks which can be used for audio output with a text reader such as WYNN or a screen reader such as JAWS. In addition, these electronic versions can use magnification for large print. Electronic textbooks can also be converted to wave/MP3 for more portability. We can provide guidelines on how to create MP3 versions of electronic materials.
  • Raised tactile images used by students who need to be able to feel graphic images.

Alternative Formats Conversion Process

Eligible students will:

  • Register for classes. 
  • Contact your instructors, the academic departments offering the course, or the bookstore to obtain textbook information. 
  • Submit a completed online request form. This form requires student demographics, the book title, ISBN and desired format. The ISBN can be located on the back of the title page or it can be secured from the bookstore when you order the textbooks. These items are required in order for OLR to make a request to the publisher.
  • Forms that are incomplete cannot be processed. If you have more books than the form allows, repeat this process. 

Upon receipt of the request, OLR will:

  • Verify the student's eligibility for alternative formats. 
  • Determine if the book is currently available or if it can be secured from other resources (local university e-text sharing) or request from the publisher. 
  • Update the student via e-mail regarding book availability and next steps. 
  • Send emails to the student throughout the process regarding receipt from publishers or in-house editing. Students are encouraged to review and address the emails in a timely fashion.

Learn More About Alternative Format FAQ >>
Make a Request for Alternative Formats >>
Cancel a Request for Alternative Formats >>

Self-Services Alternative Format Options

SensusAccess software is now available through University of Dayton's Office of Learning Resources website.  This allows a University of Dayton employee the ability to transform a document(s) into a format that is accessible to students with disabilities.  It is also available to a University of Dayton student with a documented disability to convert documents independently.  The goal is to increase accessibility and independence of all users.
Use Self-Service Options >>
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Ryan C. Harris Adaptive Learning Lab & Assistive Technology

Our office has a state-of-the-art assistive technology lab available for select students with disabilities to utilize for studying and testing accommodations.  OLR offers technical training for eligible students on specific programs supported in Ryan's Lab as well as resources for select free and open-source technology.

Ryan’s Dream

Like many students, Ryan arrived at UD ready to demonstrate that he could succeed in a very demanding academic environment. Ryan did just that and successfully negotiated having a disability through determination and support from OLR (formerly Disability Services). At the end of his second year experience, Ryan wrote a paper in which he described a vision of a learning center on campus where students with disabilities could access state-of-the-art technology, as well as a caring and expert staff.

 
Picture of Ryan C. Harris      
"I realize that this plan is an ambitious undertaking...with dedication,
perseverance, and endurance, anything can be achieved." - Ryan C. Harris (May, 1997)   

Ryan’s life ended young; however, his dream is alive and well.  Through a generous donation, Ryan’s father not only equipped an assistive technology lab, but also expanded Ryan’s dream to create a space designed to instill passion in all students and faculty for learning and teaching.  The Ryan C. Harris Learning Teaching Center is proud to be dedicated to the memory of a UD student and to fulfilling his dream.

Ryan's Lab Hours & Location

Ryan's Lab is open during posted hours of the Learning Teaching Center. You are unable to access Ryan's Lab when the LTC is closed; however, the library has three computers with some assistive technology. One computer is located in the reference section of the library on the first floor and two computers are located on the second floor. All three computers are marked as ADA workstations. Students can also visit the OLR page on Learning Technology Resources for open source software options for personal computers.  Priority in Ryan's Lab is given to students with disabilities scheduled with OLR to take exams.

General Lab Hours during academic sessions (additional hours as posted for finals week):

  • Sunday 5:00 PM to 12:00 AM
  • Monday – Thursday 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
  • Friday 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM
  • Saturday Closed

Ryan’s Lab is located in the LTC, Room 045, located on the lower level of the Roesch Library.

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Volunteer Note-Taker Guidelines and Processes

Many college classes are lecture based.  As a result, it is important to learn how to take good notes.  For those students who have a disability that interferes with their ability to take notes, volunteer note-taking accommodations may be approved in conjunction with the student’s note-taking responsibilities.

Volunteer note-taking accommodations may be approved for select individuals with a documented disability that interferes with their ability to take notes.  The student with a disability is still responsible for taking his or her own notes.  Volunteer note-taking is intended for supplemental use, not as a replacement for the note-taking itself.  In addition, a copy of class notes is not a substitute for class attendance.  A volunteer note-taker can be acquired by the student requesting a peer to take notes on his or her behalf. If this is unsuccessful, the student can seek assistance from the professor to identify or request a volunteer from the class who is willing to take notes on the student's behalf. If both options are unsuccessful, the student should contact OLR for additional guidance.

It is the student's responsibility to request a volunteer note-taker in a timely fashion. Given this, students are encouraged to request a volunteer note-taker within the first two weeks of class. There are various options for note taking including carbonless paper (obtained from OLR), typing notes on the computer or making photocopies after class (at the cost of the student with a disability). It is the responsibility of the student with a disability to collect notes daily from his or her volunteer note-taker at the end of each class.

Why is the relationship between you and your volunteer note-taker important?

This relationship between you and your note taker is very important! The note taker is providing a service for you. It is important that you work with your volunteer note-taker to make these notes the best possible notes for you. Your feedback will help the note-taker know how to improve the notes they take. Please remember, the student is a volunteer and you should always be respectful in your feedback. You cannot expect a student to completely change their note taking style to meet your needs as this may not meet the volunteer note takers needs. If you feel your notes are excellent and no improvements could be made, please tell your note taker. Let him/her know they are doing a good job. This will help them have pride in their work.

How do you know if you are getting good notes?

Can you read the notes? Do the notes include important information from lectures? Do the notes include information that was written on the board, overhead, etc? Do the notes include homework assignments?  If you answer "No" to any of these questions and cannot resolve this issue with your volunteer note-taker it is your responsibility to ask someone else to fulfill this role. Note-taking is a reflection of that individual's knowledge base and perception of importance of the material. This perception may be different than your own. Again, the difference reflects the importance of taking your own notes.

Additional Resources
Pepnet online note taker training >>
Learning and study resources for notetaking >>
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Course Substitution and Waiver

Students with disabilities must complete all academic and internship requirements for the degree(s) they are pursuing. Occasionally, limitations of a disability will warrant substitution of a class or series of classes. In such cases, it is important to note that these class requirements will not be waived, but rather substituted with other courses.  A substitution course must be of equal academic rigor, meet the academic standards of the department in which the substitution is requested, and the students’ documentation must clearly support the request.

In some instances, however, a course substitution would not be considered an appropriate accommodation. These include:

  • The class is an integral part of the program, major, or minor; substitution would jeopardize the integrity of the particular program.
  • The substitution could not fulfill the competency required for a particular degree.
  • The documentation of disability does not support the need for such accommodation.

After consultation with OLR, students must work with their Academic Dean, Department Chair or Academic Advisor to finalize decisions regarding whether or not a class or series of classes is integral to the program. If a student cannot meet requirements that are proven to be integral to a specific program despite other appropriate accommodations, the student may be considered unqualified to pursue that particular course of study. In such a situation, academic, career, and personal counseling resources are available at the University to assist the student.
Request form for course substitution >>
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Study Abroad

The University of Dayton offers a wide range of campus learning experiences. UD currently have exchange programs available for students to study in several foreign countries. Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to plan early for these opportunities. It is important to note that programs which are supported by University of Dayton, like the Study Abroad, may also be appropriate for approved academic accommodations. However, not all programs affiliated with Study Abroad are experienced in providing reasonable accommodations. In many cases, accommodations do not apply to these countries as they are not covered by United Stated mandated legislation nor do they have similar legislation in their country. Students are encouraged to communicate their plans to study abroad early so that we can discuss potential methods to address reasonable accommodations.
Learn more at Center for International Programs >>
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Handbook for Students with Disabilities

The Handbook for Students with Disabilities provides valuable information about disability services at the University of Dayton.  This includes information associated with registering as a student with a disability, accommodations, assistive technology, University Policies, Procedures, Guidelines and related programs.
Download Handbook for Students with Disabilities (opens a PDF) >>
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University of Dayton Policies

All University of Dayton students are to follow established policies and guidelines.   The information on the following page is from various sources at the University of Dayton. While not all of this information is limited to students with disabilities, the policies referenced may be related to disability issues.
Learn more about University of Dayton Policies >>
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Additional Resources for Students with Disabilities

We have developed a list of external resources for students with disabilities, their families and others within the community.  On this page, you will find information including general and disability specific organizations as well as a variety of financial aid organizations.
Learn more about additional resources for students with disabilities>>
Learn more about teaching students with disabilities >>
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International Student Resources

Image of puzzle depicting course concepts

Learn to learn, live, and work together.  For real.

The University of Dayton's Marianist focus on learning and living together provides everyone at UD the opportunity to learn how to live and work effectively in our increasingly diverse, global society. Take advantage of the many ways you can learn from and with people different from yourself! The Office of Learning Resources offers a wide variety of services to help everyone become successful learners in American classrooms. Explore our web site, attend one of our global learning support sessions for international and American students, or contact our office and meet with a staff member.  

 

This clay sculpture was created and painted by international students enrolled in the spring 2014 Learning Connections course.  The puzzle visually represents course concepts.

Global Sucess Series

Global Success Series are offered on Mondays from 5:00PM-6:00PM in the LTC Team Space (ground floor of the Roesch Library).

Register for an upcoming Global Success Series event now >

 

Featured Video



To watch this video with captions, click on the CC button.  Please note, YouTube Translations is still in beta testing.

Featured Tip

Studying a day or two before an exam is called cramming.  This type of studying is not enough time for your brain to form strong neural connections and store this new content in your long-term memory.  Cramming, by definition, is not learning.  Arrange an office visit or attend one of our services to learn about other ways to study.

Global Learning Support

Consultations
We are happy to meet with you to discuss your approaches to learning and studying. Our professional staff are available to meet with you in single or multiple sessions if requested. Referrals to campus and community resources will be made when appropriate and informal disability screenings are offered. To request an appointment please complete our online consultation form.  We can also match you with a trained peer International Peer Academic Coaches (IPACs). 
Complete our consultation form now >>

International Peer Academic Coaching (IPACs) is now available for all the students through appointments or during our International Walk-In Support. The spring 2014 semester walk-in hours are every Thursday from 5:00PM-6:00PM in the LTC Studio (ground floor of the Roesch Library).  You can also arrange an appointment by calling  937-229-2066. 

Global Conversation Groups 

No registration required. All international and American students are welcome. Talk about assigned prompts or any learning topics you would like to discuss. IPACs will facilitate one-on-one sessions, small group sessions, and large group sessions. Sessions take place every Monday from 5:00PM-6:00PM in the LTC Forum (ground floor of the Roesch Library). 

Global Success Series are offered on Mondays from 5:00PM-6:00PM in the LTC Team Space (ground floor of the Roesch Library).

  • 4/15 How to succeed in an exam
  • 4/17 How to meet the challenges of academic terms in the School of Engineering
  • 4/17 How to meet the challenges of academic terms in the School of Business Administration

Academic Courses

ARCC | Academic Renewal Course and Coaching Program
Interested in learning more about learning? This one (1) credit, seven-week learning course (DEV 055) will help you enhance your current approaches to learning and studying. The course includes one-on-one academic coaching. Complete our inquiry form to reserve a seat or to learn more about the course. Limited seats available.
Complete our ARCC inquiry form now >>

Learning Connections
In this two (2) credit course (UDI 149), international students explore the relationship between the research on learning, neuroscience, and their experience of and needs in learning. The course requires students to make connections between the content of this course and their past and present learning experiences.  The goal of the course is to further develop approaches to studying and enhance all of their learning experiences in American college classes.  Limited seats available.

Here are what international students are saying about this course:

  • "It helped me as an international student to understand how learning works in American system."
  • "I would tell my friends or classmates that this class is different and it is truly helpful for us to learn how to learn."
  • "This class is very helpful in terms of providing you methods and ways to exponentially improve your academic performance. You will find results if you take this class." 

Complete our Learning Connections inquiry form now>>

Additional Resources

Looking for learning resources?
Explore more tools to enhance your learning >>
Explore free learning technologies >>

View the learning support guide (tutoring, Supplemental Instruction, writing support) now >>
Visit Study Guides and Strategies (content provided in over 39 languages) >>

Faculty and Staff Resources

Image of books on shelves

Learning and teaching.  Two sides of the same coin.

Everything we know about learning today tells us that effective teaching is not simply about delivering content. It is about what and how much content, when and how it is provided to students, how we ask them to engage with it, how we support them in the process of learning, and how we assess what they have learned.  It is also about teachers continuing to learn ways to facilitate their students' learning.

Featured Tip

Looking for online apps to enhance the learning of your students? Explore Chrome's App Store and search the large selection of educational apps >>


Featured Book

Teaching for Critical Thinking by Stephen Brookfield
Stephen Brookfield's newest -and brand new -book promises to help readers explore critical thinking what it is and why it's important, how students learn to use it, general principles and applications to different disciplines.

Featured Video

Sir Ken Robinson - The Art of Teaching



To watch this video with captions, click on the CC button.  Please note, YouTube Translations is still in beta testing.

We offer the following resources to help you continue your learning journey!  Follow the links below for information:

Accessible Syllabus Template
Applicant Rating Form for Faculty
Faculty and Staff  Consultations
How to Refer for Services
Learning and Teaching Resources
Planning Inclusive Events
Recording of Lectures
Self-Services to Alternative Formats
Students with Disabilities
Testing Accommodations

Looking for services for international students?  Click on our new tab for International Student Resources.


Accessible Syllabus Template

Imagine not being able to understand the information in a course syllabus.  This template is provided to help increase access to your syllabus for all students in your course. Instructions for how to create a new accessible electronic syllabus or update a previous syllabus to make it accessible are provided within the document.  Questions?  No worries, just contact our office at 937-229-2066.
Download our Accessible Syllabus Template now (opens a Word document) >>
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Applicant Rating Form for Faculty

OLR relies on faculty support for hiring our positions.  If you are a faculty member and have been asked to evaluate an applicant for a position in our office, please complete this online rating form. 
Review our position descriptions >>
Complete the online rating form >>
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Faculty and Staff Consultations

We are available to meet with faculty and staff to discuss assignment and course design, disability related topics, inclusive learning design, learning strategies, teaching in a global learning community, training or workshop design, etc.  Contact us at 937-229-2066 or by e-mail to arrange your consultation today. 
E-mail OLR to arrange your consultation now >>

The LTC's Office of Faculty and Leadership Development offers a variety of programs and services to support the professional development of department chairs and faculty. 
Learn more about faculty development >

With over 1400 international students from 40 different countries, UD welcomes students from all over the world.  Faculty and staff can arrange a consultation with our International Student Learning Initiatives Coordinator or other staff in the LTC.
E-mail us to arrange your consultation now >>
Learn more about teaching in a global learning community >>
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How to Refer for Services

OLR offers a wide variety of services to assist all students in achieving academic success at the University of Dayton including: individual consultations, academic coaching, tutoring and other course-specific resources, as well as services for students with disabilities.  Students, faculty, and staff can contact our office to discuss referral options for a student that may need accommodations. Confidentiality is maintained.
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Learning and Teaching Resources

Looking for resources for learning and teaching?  Check out these articles and tips.
Just Don't Sit There (opens a PDF) >>
Learn more about teaching students with disabilities >>

Service Animals on Campus (opens a PDF) >>

TeachHub: 20 Amazing iPad Apps for Educators >>
Testing Accommodations FAQs (opens a PDF) >>
The Chronicle: Six Top Smartphone Apps to Improve Teaching, Research and your Life >>
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Planning Inclusive Events

As you begin to plan an upcoming event or session, please consider how you can make the event and the materials that support it as inclusive as possible. Doing so will help ensure that your event is effective and enjoyable for anyone who is interested in participating.
Download our tips for Planning Inclusive Events (opens PDF) >>
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Recording of Lectures

Some students have an academic accommodation to permit audio recording of lectures.  Other students learn best when they have an audio file for reference, therefore they also want to record lectures.  Faculty can provide guidance to all students regarding their responsibilities in audio recording classes.  Some suggestions include:

  • Recordings should only be used as a personal aid to study for that course..
  • Audio files are not to be distributed, copied or shared without the written consent of the lecturer.
  • If open discussions tend to reveal personal information, it would be appropriate for the instructor to ask the student with a disability to turn off the recorder device during these discussions only.
  • Recorded lectures may not be used in any way against the faculty member, other lecturer, or students whose classroom comments may have been recorded as part of the class.
  • Information contained in the recorded lectures is considered intellectual property and may not be published or quoted without the expressed consent of and credit to the instructor.
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Self-Services Alternative Format Options

SensusAccess software is now available through OLR's website.  This allows a University of Dayton employee the ability to transform a document(s) into a format that is accessible to students with disabilities.  It is also available to a University of Dayton student with a documented disability to convert documents independently.  The goal is to increase accessibility and independence of all users.
Use self-service options >>
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Students with Disabilities

OLR provides services, auxiliary aids, and accommodations for University of Dayton students with disabilities. At the same time, we assist faculty in their responsibilities to ensure all students have access to classroom instruction. This portion of the web site contains information for faculty and staff to assist in understanding the needs of students with disabilities and provide information about services, policies, and procedures.

Learn more about faculty involvement with students with disabilities>>
Learn more about teaching students with disabilities >>
Learn more about general disability resources >>
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Testing Accommodations

Alternative testing is an academic accommodation for select students registered with OLR.  This accommodation provides students with equitable access in the testing environment.  Eligibility is determined on a case by case basis and services may include extended time, distraction reduced testing environment, assistive technology, Interpreters, etc.  Students and faculty who are unable to coordinate a space for testing accommodations can schedule tests in the OLR Testing Center.

For the ease of faculty, tests can be e-mailed or delivered to OLR Testing Center, 002 Albert Emmanuel. The Testing Center is open from 8:30AM - 4:30PM, Monday through Friday. Faculty can also pick up or deliver tests to the OLR main office until 7:00 pm Monday through Thursday.

E-mail a test now to the OLR Testing Center >>
Learn more about frequently asked testing questions from faculty >>
Learn more about setting up extended time on online exams administered through Isidore>>
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Online Forms

Image of a computer

Need a form?  We got' em.

This page includes frequently used online forms for the Office of Learning Resources (OLR).  If you have any difficulty with our forms or if you can't find the form you are looking for, please give us a call at 937-229-2066.  Our team will be happy to help you out.

Follow the links below to find the form you need:

Applicant Rating Form for Faculty
ARCC Inquiry Form
Consultation Form
Disability Forms
Departmental Learning Support Update Form
Self-Services Alternative Format Options
Testing Forms
Testing Center Links for Faculty
Tutoring by Appointment


Applicant Rating Form for Faculty

Our office relies on faculty recommendations for our position.  If you are a faculty member and have been asked to rate a student applicant for a position in our office, please complete this online form.
Review our position descriptions >>
Complete the online rating form >>
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ARCC Inquiry Form

Are you interested in registering for the Academic Renewal Course and Coaching (ARCC) program (DEV 055)?  If so, complete this form to learn more about it or to reserve a seat in this seven-week learning course.  
ARCC Inquiry Form >>
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Consultation Form

If you plan to scheduled or have already scheduled a student consultation or academic coaching session, please complete this form before your first scheduled meeting with a staff member. 
Complete our Consultation Form >>
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Departmental Learning Support Update Form

At the beginning of each semester, we ask that all departments who offer regularly scheduled learning support submit updated information for the semester using this form.  Please submit this form as many times as needed to report changes or new offerings during the semester.  
Complete the departmental learning support update form now >>
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Disability Forms

These forms are for students with disabilities who are registered with OLR and approved for accommodations.  For more information on these topics, please visit the Disability Resources Tab above.
Request Alternative Formats or E-text >>
Cancel Alternative Formats or E-text >>
Request Furniture Accommodations >>
Request Accommodation Letters >>
Request for Course Substitution / Waiver >>

If you are a student who is interesting in discussing academic accommodations for the first time, please follow the link for Initial Accommodation Request below. (Note students who have been approved and completed the intake process should use the Request Accommodation Letters link above.)
Initial Accommodation Request>>

Testing Forms
These forms are for registered and approved students with disabilities. For more information on testing accommodations, please visit the Disability Resources Tab above.
Schedule a quiz, test or exam >>
Cancel your scheduled exam >>
Reschedule your exam >>
Schedule your final exams >>
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Self-Services Alternative Format Options

SensusAccess software is now available through OLR's website.  This allows a University of Dayton employee the ability to transform a document(s) into a format that is accessible to students with disabilities.  It is also available to a University of Dayton student with a documented disability to convert documents independently.  The goal is to increase accessibility and independence of all users.
Use self-service options >>
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Testing Center Links for Faculty 

Alternative testing is an academic accommodation for select students registered with OLR.  This accommodation provides students with equitable access in the testing environment.  Eligibility is determined on a case by case basis and services may include extended time, distraction reduced testing environment, assistive technology, Interpreters, etc.  Students and faculty who are unable to coordinate a space for testing accommodations can complete tests in the OLR Testing Center. 

For the ease of faculty, tests can be e-mailed or delivered to OLR Testing Center, 002 Albert Emmanuel. The Testing Center is open from 8:30AM - 4:30PM, Monday through Friday. Faculty can also pick up or deliver tests to the OLR main office until 7:00 pm Monday through Thursday.

E-mail a test now to the OLR Testing Center >>
Learn more about frequently asked testing questions from faculty >>
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Tutoring by Appointment

Language tutoring by appointment is available for Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Latin, and Spanish during the Fall and Spring semesters.  If you are currently enrolled in one of these language courses and are interested in scheduling a tutoring session, you can complete our online request form.  We are unable to guarantee that a tutor can be found for each requested and approved course. 
Complete a tutor request form now for your language course >>

Scheduled tutoring appointments may be requested by registered and pre-approved students with disabilities and student athletes.  Approvals for these requests are determined by our office. We are unable to guarantee that a Tutor can be found for each requested and approved course. 
Complete a tutor request form now for students with disabilities >>

All current student athletes have the ability to schedule tutoring by appointment through Tutor Trac. This form should only be completed if a Tutor is not listed for a specific course in Tutor Trac. Approvals for these requests are determined by the Office of Academic Services for Student Athletes (OASSA).
Complete a tutor request form now for student athletes  >>

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Contact our office via e-mail or phone

We've Got a Lot More to Share

   OLR is your partner in learning and we'd love to hear from you.  Please feel free to contact us directly.


Main Office
Ryan C. Harris Learning Teaching Center (LTC)
Room 023
University of Dayton
300 College Park
Dayton, OH 45469-130

Testing Center
Albert Emanuel
Room 002

Quick Link for Faculty
E-mail your exam now >>

Phone: (937) 229-2066
Fax: (937) 229-3270

Our TTY number is available for
individuals who are deaf and hard-of hearing.
TTY: (937) 229-2059

Office Hours
When classes are in session

M-TH  8:30 AM - 7:00 PM
FR  8:30 AM - 4:30 PM

Summer Office Hours
and when classes are not in session

M-FR  8:30 AM - 4:30 PM

Emails
General inquires >>
Disability related inquires >>
Global learning inquiries >>