Excellence in Engineering Teaching and Scholarship

05.12.2008 | Engineering, FacultyTo say these engineering faculty members are touching many lives is an understatement.

Guru Subramanyam, a University of Dayton associate professor of computer and electrical engineering, has a patent pending for a device he hopes will expand the functional capabilities of cell phones. Both Nokia and Motorola have plans to use his technology.

"Dr. Subramanyam has a consistent record of research funding. He has been awarded three summer faculty research fellowships, and he has served as the principal investigator for more than 15 sponsored projects," said associate physics professor Peter Powers during Subramanyam's award presentation. "For these and many other outstanding accomplishments, Dr. Subramanyam is the recipient of the 2008 Alumni Award in Scholarship."

Margie Pinnell, a UD assistant mechanical engineering professor, tirelessly works to emphasize how students can use engineering to help others. She is the faculty advisor for Engineers for Technical Humanitarian Opportunities for Service. Her students have traveled the world to help people in developing nations clean water supplies and escape deadly conditions generated by indoor cooking stoves.

"Dr. Pinnell is an innovative teacher. She has been effective in bringing experiential learning into what had been strictly lecture-oriented courses," Powers said during the presentation to Pinnell. "This helps students branch out to learn about conducting research, working as a team, writing technical reports and giving formal technical presentations. As a result of her creativity and innovation in teaching, Dr. Margaret Pinnell is the 2008 recipient of the Alumni Award in Teaching."

Pinnell and Subramanyam are the sixth and seventh engineering faculty to win either award since 2000.

For more information, contact Shawn Robinson, associate director of media relations, at 937-229-3391 or srobinson@udayton.edu.