Going Global

06.05.2008 | Engineering, Students, International

When 31 Chinese engineering students start their senior year at the University of Dayton, they'll be joining a record number of international students choosing UD and add to the University's growing reputation as a great place for foreign students.

A welcome reception for the engineering students will be held from 4 to 6 p.m., Thursday, June 5 in the Kennedy Union Torch Lounge. It's the largest class of students coming to study here in the third year of a dual degree partnership between UD and Shanghai Normal University.

Interest and commitments from international students are on the rise, so much so that UD enrollment officials are expecting the number of international students to triple this fall.

Applications from international students are up 76 percent to almost 500 for the 2008-09 school year, according to Tricia Penno, communications coordinator for UD's Center for International Programs.

UD has accepted 84 international students, exceeding its admission goal by 65 percent. The University has received deposits from students in Canada, China, the United Kingdom, Ghana, Indonesia, Korea, Kuwait, Lebanon, Mauritius, Saudi Arabia and Togo.

The University expects 30 international students, more than three times the number from last year, will be enrolled as first-year students by the time classes start in August, said Jacob Hemmerick, international admission counselor.

Some of the increase comes from more aggressive recruitment and new strategies, but UD is also benefiting from a higher level of international visibility and reputation, he said.

For two straight semesters, UD has ranked first in international student satisfaction, according to an International Student Barometer survey, the largest study of international students in the world. UD ranks as the fifth best university for Chinese students studying abroad, according to AOJI Study Abroad, a student-recruiting agency.

Penno said good student experiences with innovative programs, such as the partnership with Shanghai Normal University, are helping to create positive buzz about UD. In that program, students study engineering for three years in China and one year at UD, earning degrees from both schools.

The size of the incoming class, more than double that of the first two years, is evidence that word is getting out about the quality of the UD experience, Penno said.

"We knew that if the students from the first two years liked their UD experience we would see an increased number this year," Penno said. "These numbers speak to the reputation the University has earned."

Another new partnership this summer will bring 13 high school students from Singapore, to focus on business, engineering, science and technology. Hemmerick hopes that some of those students will consider UD when choosing a college.

Other international initiatives include:

* International partnerships are yielding students. Later this month in India, UD officials will finalize an agreement with Sri Ramasamy Memorial University. Officials from the Loyola Institute of Business Administration visited Dayton this spring to sign UD's first partnership with an Indian school. As a result of other partnerships, eight students are coming in the fall from Korea University; one from Ireland; three from the Netherlands and six from France.

* An emphasis on connecting to Marianist partners is paying off. Three students from international Marianist high schools, one from Malawi, attend UD on full-tuition scholarships. An increased number of Marianist brothers from around the world are coming to UD for graduate, undergraduate and intensive English education.

* UD is ramping up international recruitment efforts in India, China, Southeast Asia and the Middle East, including participation in the first recruitment trip by a group of U.S. institutions to Israel and the West Bank.

For more information, contact Cilla Shindell, director of media relations, at 937-229-3257 or shindell@udayton.edu.