International Scholar

05.13.2010 | International, Students
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It looks like University of Dayton senior Zachary Sideras will be packing his bags again, on track to be awarded a prestigious national scholarship for up to $26,000 for his fourth study-abroad experience.

Sideras, of Kettering, Ohio, is the District 6670 nominee for the 2011-2012 Rotary Club Ambassadorial Scholarship. An honors student majoring in international studies and history, he was nominated by the Rotary Club of Dayton. As a Rotary scholar, he plans to pursue a graduate degree in a Middle Eastern-related field.

Ambassadorial scholars identify five academic institutions they would like to attend, and make applications to those institutions. Rotary International has the final decision about which institution students attend. Sideras has selected institutions in the United Kingdom, Lebanon and Canada, all with particularly strong programs in Middle Eastern studies.

"At the University of Dayton, I have had the great fortune to explore my interests both in the United States and the Middle East," Sideras said. "The Ambassadorial Scholarship is a great fit for me because the core mission of the program is similar to the University's commitment to 'Learn, Lead and Serve.' I am excited to pursue graduate studies overseas while building goodwill within the community to which I am assigned."

Ambassadorial Scholarships, the Rotary Foundation's oldest and best-known program, was founded in 1947 and has helped more than 40,000 students from about 100 nations study abroad. It is one of the world's largest privately funded international scholarship programs. Through grants totaling approximately $16.2 million, nearly 700 recipients from about 70 countries studied in more than 80 nations in 2009-10.

Sideras previously studied Arabic and Middle Eastern history and culture at American University in Cairo during the fall 2009 semester through a Boren Scholarship from the Institute of International Education. He also studied at Birzeit University near Ramallah in the West Bank and Al-Akhawayn University in Morocco.

In summer 2009, he worked as an intern at the Palestine Center in Washington, D.C., an extension of the Jerusalem Fund that communicates information about the Palestinian political experience to American policy-makers, journalists, students and the general public.

He plans to graduate from the University of Dayton in 2011.

For more information, contact Cilla Shindell, director of media relations, at 937-229-3257 or shindell@udayton.edu.