Honors, Scholars and More

09.14.2011 | Faculty, Research, Business, Hot Topics, Engineering, Science, Catholic, Culture and Society, Campus and Community

'NEW YORK TIMES' EDITOR WILL SHARE 'PORTRAITS OF GRIEF' FROM 9/11 

Wendell Jamieson, The New York Times deputy metro editor, will discuss "Portraits of Grief" at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 19, in the Kennedy Union west ballroom at the University of Dayton. It is free and open to the public. In 2001 and 2002, Jamieson was the editor of "Portraits of Grief," which chronicled the lives of those who died in the terror attacks on the World Trade Center. "Portraits of Grief" was part of a package — "A Nation Challenged" — that won a Pulitzer Prize for public service. The citation read: "Awarded to The New York Times for 'A Nation Challenged,' a special section published regularly after the September 11th terrorist attacks on America, which coherently and comprehensively covered the tragic events, profiled the victims, and tracked the developing story, locally and globally." According to Amazon.com's description of the book, few aspects of The New York Times' coverage of September 11 and of all that has followed have attracted as much comment as "Portraits of Grief." Starting Sept. 14, 2001, a half-dozen Times reporters began working from a stack of 100 missing-person fliers posted around the World Trade Center site to write profiles, according to Amazon.com. Before becoming the deputy metro editor for the Times in 2011, Jamieson also worked there as editor of the Times' "City Room" blog, metro assignment editor, city editor and styles editor. For more information, contact Elizabeth Reeves. For interviews, contact Shawn Robinson at 937-229-3391.

'THE NUTS 'N' BOLTS OF SUPERVISION  

"Going from Peer to Supervisor: The Nuts 'N' Bolts of Supervision" and "Coaching Skills for Supervisors" are among the upcoming sessions in the University of Dayton's Center for Leadership and Executive Development's Supervisor and Professional Development Programs. The sessions are Sept. 20 and 21, respectively. Two other sessions later this month are "Assertiveness Skills: Communicating with Impact" and "Dealing with the Damaging Effects of Workplace Gossip" on Sept. 27 and Oct. 4. All sessions are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the 1700 South Patterson Building on the University of Dayton campus, except for Oct. 4 which runs from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The cost for a Successful Supervisor Series program is $395 per session for the general public, $345 for University of Dayton alumni and $290 for CLED partners. For a complete schedule, list of speakers and session topics or to register, call 937-229-3115 or visit the Center for Leadership and Executive Development website.

LAW PROFESSOR HONORED FOR EFFORTS TO ELIMINATE HOMELESSNESS IN THE DAYTON REGION 

Homefull, formerly The Other Place, will honor University of Dayton School of Law Professor Richard Saphire for his contributions to making Dayton "a community where there is no homelessness." He will receive the honor during Homefull's annual fundraising event 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21, in the Carillon Historical Park's Transportation Center. Homefull also will honor Montgomery County Administrator Deborah Feldman. "We are so pleased to be able to recognize the accomplishments and partnership that Rich and Deb have shared with Homefull and our community's Homeless Solutions Plan," said Executive Director Tina Patterson. For more information, visit the Homefull website or call 937-293-1945. For interviews, contact Shawn Robinson at 937-229-3391

NOBEL LAUREATE TO DISCUSS 'DIRE PREDICTIONS' FOR GLOBAL WARMING'

Michael Mann, professor of geosciences at Pennsylvania State University, 2007 Nobel Peace Prize winner and lead author of a chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Scientific Assessment Report, will discuss the "Dire Predictions for Global Warming" at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, in the Kennedy Union ballroom at the University of Dayton. It is free and open to the public. In 2002, Scientific American selected Mann as one of 50 leading visionaries in science and technology. He is the author of more than 140 peer-reviewed and edited publications and recently co-wrote Dire Predictions: Understanding Global Warming with Lee Kump. He is also co-founder and contributor to the award-winning science website realclimate.org. For more information, contact the Shuang-Ye Wu at 937-229-1720. For interviews, contact Cameron Fullam at 937-229-3256.

 SPEAKER WILL DISCUSS CATHOLIC, LUTHERAN DIALOGUE 

Johannes Brosseder, an internationally known theologian from the University of Cologne, Germany, will give a talk 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29, in Sears Recital Hall at the University of Dayton. Brosseder is a noted authority on the 35-year history of dialogue between the Roman Catholic Church and the Lutheran World Federation, which resulted in a far-reaching 1999 agreement for greater ecumenical communion and understanding. Brosseder will trace the movements and actions of the two religions since 1999 to bridge differences present since the Reformation and foster greater recognition and cooperation. For interviews, contact Cilla Shindell at 937-229-3257.

ENGINEERING FACULTY AARON ALTMAN RECEIVES SPECIAL SERVICE CITATION 

The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) awarded University of Dayton mechanical and aeronautical engineering associate professor Aaron Altman an AIAA special service citation. The citation is awarded to individuals for their voluntary contributions of time and effort, which have substantially and uniquely benefited an AIAA region, section or student branch. With more than 29,000 members, AIAA is the world's largest professional society devoted to the progress of engineering and science in aviation, space and defense. For more information or interviews, contact Shawn Robinson at 937-229-3391.

ENGINEERING CHAIR SERVES ON NATIONAL PANEL TO EXAMINE MILITARY PROPULSION SYSTEMS 

Charles Browning, chair of the University of Dayton's chemical and materials engineering program, worked alongside MIT, Notre Dame and NASA researchers on a National Research Council panel examining material needs and research and development strategy for future military aerospace propulsion systems. The National Academy of Sciences organized the National Research Council to help the federal government learn from the science and technology community. The Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, public and scientific and engineering communities. For more information or interviews, contact Shawn Robinson at 937-229-3391.