English

First-Year Writing Courses

Placement and Overview

Students are placed by the College of Arts and Sciences into the appropriate writing course in accordance with the guidelines below. If you have a question regarding a particular placement, contact the College of Arts and Sciences Office of the Dean.

ENG 100: Writing Seminar I

This course focuses on personal and academic literacies, with an emphasis on expository writing and the development of college-level reading, writing, research, and critical thinking skills as well as a process approach to writing. With its focus on personal and academic literacies, ENG 100 addresses the question, “What does it mean to be human?” as it explores the relationship between literacy and being human.

ENG 100 Course Learning Outcomes (CLO)

Upon completion of ENG 100, students should be able to:

  1. Write about primary and secondary texts on the topic of literacy from the perspective of English Studies and at least one additional discipline in the Humanities Commons in a manner that reflects their ability to read critically;

  2. Engage in a process approach to writing college-level prose;

  3. Produce rhetorically effective college-level expository prose;

  4. Demonstrate effective use of scholarly sources in their writing;

  5. Recount in college-level prose their personal literacy histories and current literacy practices;

  6. Examine in writing the discourse of a community different from themselves with respect to factors such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and so forth; and

  7. Explore the relevance of Catholic intellectual tradition for the study of reading, writing, and/or rhetoric as human endeavors.

Stretch ENG 100: ENG 100A and 100B Writing Seminar 1

Together, ENG 100A and ENG 100B deliver the same student learning outcomes as ENG 100, but they do so over two semesters rather than one. Designed as a “stretch” version of ENG 100, ENG 100A/B is aimed at enabling students to achieve the outcomes of ENG 100 who might struggle if required to do so in just 16 weeks. Students receive two credits for successfully completing ENG 100A and another two credits for successfully completing ENG 100B. Students must successfully complete both ENG 100A and ENG 100B in order to enroll in ENG 200 during their second year.

ENG 100A: First half of year-long introductory composition course focused on personal and academic literacies, with an emphasis on expository writing. Instruction and practice in developing college-level reading, writing, research, and critical thinking skills. Emphasis is on a process approach to writing effective academic prose. Prerequisite(s): Placement as determined by the Dean’s office.

ENG 100B: Second half of year-long introductory composition course focused on personal and academic literacies, with an emphasis on expository writing. Instruction and practice in developing college-level reading, writing, research, and critical thinking skills. Emphasis is on a process approach to writing effective academic prose. Prerequisite(s): ENG 100A.

ENG 114: First-Year Writing Seminar

A variable theme writing seminar focused on academic writing, research, and argumentation practices for engaging public discourses. The course is an examination of contemporary social problems through practices of sustained critical inquiry with the goal of contributing in writing to public discourses.

ENG 114 is a course for students who demonstrate high writing proficiency and therefore fulfills the Second-Year Writing Requirement of CAP in students’ first year. ENG 114 focuses on academic writing, research, and argumentation for a public audience. As part of the Humanities Commons, this course requires students to consider academic reading and writing as means of exploring and responding to contemporary social problems. Students will read and produce texts (widely conceived) that interrogate, synthesize, and otherwise respond to public discourses about social problems. In doing this, students will contribute to the common good by understanding and participating in relevant contemporary issues.

ENG 114 Course Learning Outcomes (CLO)

  1. Demonstrate critical reading of texts. Students will read a variety of primary texts closely and critically (including self-critically). ENG 114 introduces students to the practices of close, contextual reading as a foundation for written response. ENG 114 reinforces HCSLO 1 while acknowledging that what makes a "primary text" differs from one discipline to another.

  2. Produce well-researched and supported arguments that appeal to public audiences. Students will analyze, in writing, a variety of texts contributing to larger historical conversations, debates, and traditions and as resources for understanding and appreciating the complexities of human identity, dignity, and experience. As a writing course, students in ENG 114 will be required to produce a variety of analyses and responses to texts that situate particular histories, debates, and traditions. Individual instructors will determine, as appropriate to the course theme, the specific types of public audiences and genres of writing that students will produce. 

  3. Respond to diverse perspectives on social inequalities. Students will develop an understanding of their place in community, country, and world in relationship to multiple others, with particular attention to differences - such as class, gender, (dis)ability, and race - upon which social inequalities are constructed and maintained. ENG 114 course outcome 3 requires that students respond to diverse perspectives on social inequality, thereby not only acknowledging differences, but responding to how these differences (re)produce imbalances of power. This outcome could be achieved through a discussion of themed readings on social inequities.

  4. Engage in a process of inquiry culminating in a research project that responds to a contemporary social problem. Drawing on the course theme and content as well as the recursive and integrating practices of research, students will work to develop arguments that examine contemporary social problems, a practice that requires students to think broadly about the interdisciplinary connections of their research topic and to integrate source material toward a greater understanding of their topic and argument.

    Students will also examine the question of what it means to be human from a disciplinary perspective, and in the process make connections among disciplines and develop an appreciation for the ways in which learning is a process of integrating knowledge.

    Through the production of a research project, students will understand and practice academic honesty as foundational to the making and sharing of knowledge as a community of learners that is both local and global. Students in ENG 114 will learn to effectively document material from outside sources and, perhaps more importantly, understand the importance of attribution in the production of their own contributions to public conversations on contemporary social problems.

  5. Reflect upon the habits of research and argumentation as inherited from the Catholic Intellectual Tradition. Students will engage central concepts of Catholic Intellectual Tradition as they contribute to humanistic inquiry and reflection in the relevant academic discipline. Students in ENG 114 will reflect upon the practices of research and argumentation with respect to the histories, research processes, and/or texts as inherited from the Catholic Intellectual Tradition.

ENG 198: Honors Writing Seminar

Structured as a variable theme composition course focused on academic writing, research, and argumentation, students will examine a particular topic through sustained critical inquiry, with the goal of contributing to a scholarly conversation in writing. The course introduces students to the practices of scholarship and inquiry that will comprise their experience as Honors students at the University of Dayton. ENG 198 fulfills the First- and Second- Year Writing requirement of CAP.

Students will develop their reading, writing, research, and critical thinking abilities by participating in projects that include, for example, conducting research for a thesis project, working as a research assistant on faculty projects, and sharing their work in appropriate academic venues (i.e., professional conferences, Berry Summer Institute, the Stander Symposium, etc.) This course emphasizes collaborative, shared experiences for students centered on introductory engagement with the practices of scholarship and inquiry that typify written academic discourse.

ENG 198 Course Learning Outcomes (CLO)

  1. Demonstrate critical reading of texts. Students will read a variety of primary texts closely and critically (including self-critically). ENG 198 reinforces HCSLO 1 while acknowledging that what makes a "primary text" differs from one discipline to another. Individual instructors will determine the specific types of writing the students will produce as well as the rubrics or criteria by which assignments are evaluated. ENG 198 is a course centered on the close reading of texts as a way to introduce students to the conventions of academic writing, with attention to the way writers construct and sustain an argument for academic audiences.

  2. Produce well-researched and supported arguments that contribute to a scholarly conversation. Students will analyze, in writing, a variety of texts contributing to larger historical conversations, debates, and traditions and as resources for understanding and appreciating the complexities of human identity, dignity, and experience. Students in ENG 198 will be required to produce a variety of analyses and responses to texts that situate particular histories, debates, and traditions. As part of this process, students will employ academic conventions and scholarly writing practices (e.g., developing research questions, identifying credible sources, engaging and incorporating the arguments of others into their own discourse, and using an appropriate citation format). An assignment wherein students contribute to scholarly conversations for an academic audience might be a literature review or annotated bibliography.

  3. Engage in a process of inquiry culminating in a research project addressed to an academic audience. Students will demonstrate an understanding of their place in community, country, and world in relationship to multiple others, with particular attention to differences—such as class, gender, and race—upon which social inequalities are constructed and maintained.

  4. Respond in writing to diverse perspectives on social inequalities. Students will respond to diverse perspectives on social inequality, thereby not only acknowledging differences, but responding to how these differences (re)produce social imbalances of power.

  5. Reflect upon the habit of scholarly inquiry and argumentation as inherited from the Catholic Intellectual tradition. Students will reflect upon the practices of academic discourse, scholarly inquiry, and argumentation with respect to the histories, research processes, and/or texts as inherited from the Catholic Intellectual Tradition.

For students in the CORE program: ASI 110 and ASI 120

Together, ASI 110 and ASI 120 constitute a challenging, broad-ranging, year-long course on the origins and development of civilizations, with particular emphasis upon the cultural heritage of Western Civilization as it evolved in the larger context of other world civilizations. While the course follows the general narrative of the history of Western Civilization and tells that story in large part by looking at developments in philosophy, literature, religious studies, and rhetoric in their historical contexts, it also seeks to understand how other civilizations developed rich and enduring traditions that help us, by comparison, to understand the complex tapestry of human experience. In addition, the course integrates the development of university-level writing skills throughout the academic year. ASI 110 explores the period from the beginnings of civilization through the seventeenth century; ASI 120 completes the course by bringing it to the present.

For CORE students, ASI 110 and 120 fulfill the Common Academic Program requirements of the Humanities Commons – ENG 200, HST 103, PHL 103, and REL 103 – plus credit for Advanced Historical Study (HST XXX). These courses are required of all University of Dayton students. Successful completion of ASI 110 and 120 earns the CORE student 15 credit hours.

ASI 110/120 Course learning Outcomes (CLO)

  1. Write about primary and secondary texts on the course theme in a manner that reflects the ability to read critically. Engage in a process approach to writing college-level prose.

  2. Produce rhetorically effective collegelevel expository prose.

  3. Write about primary and secondary texts on th ecourse theme in a manner that reflects the ability to read critically.

  4. Produce well researched academic arguments and appeals that are documented in accordance with the MLA style manual.

  5. Examine one topic from at least three disciplinary perspectives (two of which are in the Humanities Commons).

  6. Examine one topic with attention to differences such as race, class, gender, and/or sexuality.

  7. Explore the relevance of Catholic intellectual tradition for the study of reading, writing, and/or rhetoric as human endeavors.

Second-Year Writing Courses

Overview

The second-year writing course, ENG 200, is taken by students who completed ENG 100 at UD. Students who complete ENG 114 or ENG 198 will not take ENG 200 in their second year. ENG 200 is a variable theme-based writing course focused on academic discourse, research, and argumentation. By studying scholarship in different disciplines, students will develop rhetorical awareness about the arguments, approaches, and conventions of these disciplines. This course engages the question of what it means to be human in a manner fitting the context of a themed writing seminar.

ENG 200: Writing Seminar II

In this course, students further develop their reading, writing, research, and critical thinking abilities as they come into contact with the ways that at least three disciplines engage a particular theme, which is selected by the instructor. In addition, by studying scholarship across disciplines, students should develop rhetorical awareness about the arguments, approaches, and other conventions of these disciplines. Students should also develop a process approach to writing such that by the end of the course it has become the process that they use for all of their writing at the University.

ENG 200 Course Learning Outcomes (CLO)

  1. Write about primary and secondary texts on the course theme in a manner that reflects the ability to read critically.

  2. Engage in a process approach to writing college‐level prose.

  3. Produce rhetorically effective college‐level expository prose.

  4. Produce well researched academic arguments and appeals that are documented in accordance with the MLA style manual.

  5. Examine one topic from at least three disciplinary perspectives, two of which are in the Humanities Commons.

  6. Examine one topic with attention to differences such as race, class, gender, and/or sexuality.
CONTACT

Department of English

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