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Clinical Psychology

Community Psychology

Counseling Psychology

Developmental Psychology

Educational Psychology

Environmental Psychology

Experimental Psychology

Family Psychology

Forensic Psychology

Forensic psychology is the term given to the applied and clinical facets of psychology and law.
Psychology and law is a new field with career opportunities at several levels of training. As an area of research, psychology and law is concerned both with looking at legal issues from a psychological perspective (e.g., how juries decide cases) and with looking at psychological questions in a legal context (how jurors assign blame or responsibility for a crime).

Forensic psychologists might help a judge decide which parent should have custody of the children or evaluate the victim of an accident to determine if he or she sustained psychological or neurological damage. In criminal cases, forensic psychologists might evaluate a defendant's mental competence to stand trial. Some forensic psychologists counsel inmates and probationers; others counsel the victims of crimes and help them prepare to testify, cope with emotional distress, and resume their normal activities. Some specialists in this field have doctoral degrees in both psychology and law. Others were trained in a traditional graduate psychology program, such as clinical, counseling, social, or experimental, and chose courses, research topics, and practical experiences to fit their interest in psychology and law. Today, a few graduate schools have joint law/psychology programs and grant the Ph.D. and J.D. Jobs for people with doctoral degrees are available in psychology departments, law schools, research organizations, community mental health agencies, law enforcement agencies, courts, and correctional settings. Some forensic psychologists work in private practice. Master's and bachelor's level positions are available in prisons, correctional institutions, probation departments, forensic units of mental institutions, law enforcement agencies, and community based programs that assist victims.

Health Psychology

Human Factors

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Industrial/organizational psychologists are concerned with relations between people and work. Their interests include organizational structure and organizational change; workers' productivity and job satisfaction; consumer behavior; selection, placement, training, and development of personnel. I/O psychologists work in businesses, industries, governments, and educational institutions. Some may be self-employed as consultants or work for management counseling firms.

Consumer Psychologists are industrial/organizational psychologists whose interests lie in consumers' reaction to a company's products or services. They investigate consumers' preferences for a particular package design or television commercial, for example, and develop strategies for marketing products. They also try to improve the acceptability and safety of products and help the consumer make better decisions. 
Human Resource Psychologists are industrial/organizational psychologists who develop and validate procedures to select and evaluate personnel. Jobs for industrial/organizational psychologists are available at both master's and doctoral levels. Opportunities for those with master's degrees tend to be concentrated in business, industry, and government settings; doctoral-level psychologists may work in academic settings and do independent consulting work.

Neuropsychology and Psychobiology

Psychology of Aging (Geropsychology)

Psychology of Women

Psychometrics and Quantitative Psychology

Rehabilitation Psychology

School Psychology

Social Psychology

Sports Psychology

Art Therapy, Music Therapy, Dance Therapy, and Drama Therapy

For students who are interested in Art Therapy or Music Therapy, a visit to the respective web sites of the relevant associations may enlighten you about these areas:

American Art Therapy Association (www) >>

American Music Therapy Association (www) >>

American Dance Therapy Association (www) >>

National Association for Drama Therapy (www) >>