Friday October 23, 2015

FEAR Makes Its Way Into ArtStreet's IAN Installation Series

ArtStreet and the Institute for Arts Nexus opens FEAR, part three of six in the 2015-16 IAN installation series, on November 10. FEAR runs until December 17 in ArtStreet’s White Box Gallery.

FEAR is so absolutely ingrained in our society that it has nearly become an American pastime. News reports, our social media news feeds, even our daily interactions with our fellow citizens are fraught with our visions of the most horrible things that have happened, could happen or may not happen at all. FEAR presents an opportunity for us to do battle creatively against one of the most powerful emotions that holds us back from ourselves and from each other.

FEAR Creative Lead Krista Franklin is an interdisciplinary artist whose work floats between the literary and the visual. Her art draws from the well of African diasporic histories, popular culture, personal narrative, folklore, black spiritualism, ritual and magic, and the psychic interiority of people of color.

In addition to creating visual art, Franklin is a poet. Her work includes both literary and the visual elements, drawing inspiration from popular culture, personal narrative, folklore, black spiritualism and the inner character of people of color. Her artwork was recently shown on an episode of the hit television series “Empire.”

One of the main focuses of FEAR is the fight or flight response. FEAR challenges participants to reflect on the things in their lives that cause them discomfort, such as fear of missing out, fear of what people think of us or fear of succeeding.

“Fear was a concept that came up at our very first ‘Climate’ ideation, as something that unifies us all and is affected by our daily climate in so many ways: what do we have, what do we want, and what do we do when something is taken away,” said ArtStreet Associate Director Adrienne Ausdenmoore.

Throughout the weeks leading up to the opening of FEAR, elements of the current CONSUMPTION installation will transform, ultimately morphing into the new FEAR installation.

“As we developed the installation season and corresponding IAN curriculum, we have challenged our creative leads to build off of each other’s work and the captured responses from the installation’s interactive elements. This approach is far from what you see in a traditional gallery,” said Ausdenmoore.

“FEAR is gradually encroaching itself into the "world" of CONSUMPTION. FEAR is insidious and slowly takes over the simplest things in our lives and worlds. It spills out, it disrupts order, it begins to scatter and separate things. Think of it as a spillage that slowly begins to become more and more uncomfortable or difficult to ignore. It slowly eats away at the quality of our lives and gradually becomes chaotic,” says Franklin.

Students in the Institute for Arts Nexus IAN I course will finish up their first semester with four class sessions centered around the FEAR installation. Led by a team of tri-teachers, each session will help students delve even further into their own fears and the actual realities behind them.

When asked about her thoughts on teaching an IAN session, Franklin replied, “What I am most interested in [...] is the intellectual and visceral responses that the students and staff at the University of Dayton have experienced from their involvement, participation and witnessing of all three themes leading up to my installation of FEAR.”

With such an intense installation, there has been a need for a way to decompress and process the feelings and experiences that have been associated with FEAR.

“Humor has been a saving grace for me in my own life when grappling with fear. My hope and goal will be to find moments of human connection with the participants and collaborators wherein we can unpack some of the absurdity that exists inside of our individual and collective fears,” Franklin said.

In addition to FEAR and the IAN class session, Franklin is also hosting a workshop at the Trotwood branch of the Dayton Metro Library. “Altering Fear: An Altered Book Workshop” will be held on Saturday, November 7 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The workshop is free and open to the public as part of the Check Out the ARTS series. For more information on this workshop, click here

Hosting six world premiere installations annually, ArtStreet's White Box Gallery at the University of Dayton is dedicated to work that challenges social, industrial, cultural and academic perspectives. This year’s focus is on our daily climate — and our elemental responses to our environment. From the origins of want and need, to the fear of loss, the Gallery will focus on themes of THIRST, CONSUMPTION, FEAR, UPHEAVAL and REFLECTION.

ArtStreet is located at the intersection of Lawnview Avenue and Kiefaber Street on the University of Dayton campus. ArtStreet is open 8 a.m. to midnight Monday through Friday and noon to midnight Saturday and Sunday. For more information about ArtStreet events, call 937-229-5101 or visit udayton.edu/artstreet.

Detailed Schedule/Public Events

Altering Fear: Collage and Altered Book Workshop with Krista Franklin

Saturday, November 7, 2-4 p.m. Dayton Metro Libraries Trotwood branch

Krista Franklin walks you through a discussion about the concept of "fear" on both a personal and national level. Inspired by the conversation, create small collages on book pages that address fear as theme of the selected books. Presented by ArtStreet and Dayton Metro Libraries.

FEAR Opening Reception

Tuesday, November 10, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.

FEAR is so absolutely ingrained in our society that it has nearly become an American pastime. News reports, our social media news feeds, even our daily interactions with our fellow citizens are fraught with our visions of the most horrible things that have happened, could happen or may not happen at all. FEAR presents an opportunity for us to do battle creatively against one of the most powerful emotions that holds us back from ourselves and from each other. Creative Lead Krista Franklin is an interdisciplinary artist whose work floats between the literary and the visual. Her art draws from the well of African diasporic histories, popular culture, personal narrative, folklore, black spiritualism, ritual and magic, and the psychic interiority of people of color.

Press release written by Maggie Fiegl '15. 

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