Wednesday November 9, 2016

In the News: Nov. 9, 2016

By Michael Duricy

Read recent items about Mary in both Catholic and secular news. Also see International Marian Research Institute news and updates.

ML/IMRI Features

Marian Events

Mary in the Catholic Press

Mary in the Secular Press

Marian Library/International Marian Research Institute Features

Updates

Reminder about the Call for Papers for the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Ecumenical Society of the Blessed Virgin Mary--USA

ESBVM-USA July 2017 Conference Call for Papers

The Ecumenical Society of the Blessed Virgin Mary USA (ESBVM USA) exists to advance the study of Mary, the Mother of Christ, in Christian biblical and spiritual perspectives, and in the light of such study, to promote ecumenical interchange and prayer. Its aim is to show that in Mary, Christians of many traditions may find a focus in their search for unity. The ESBVM was formed by Catholic, Anglican, Methodist, Orthodox, and Presbyterian Scholars and is open to all Christians.

PROPOSAL DUE DATE: December 1, 2016

Conference Theme:  "Mary, Disciple of the Lord: Prayer and Holiness"

Conference Dates: July 12 – 15, 2017 (Wed. evening through Sat. morning).

Conference Location:  Misericordia University in Dallas, PA (near Scranton)

Submission Guidelines and Requirements:

The paper proposal should be in DOC or DOCX and must include:

    Presentation Title

    Presenter's name, professional affiliation (e.g., university or church name), and status (undergrad, grad. student, Ph.D. candidate, faculty, pastor, etc.)

    Contact information (e-mail address, daytime telephone)

    Abstract (350-500 words)

    Equipment needs.

The overall theme for the conference is "Mary, Disciple of the Lord: Prayer and Holiness." This theme may be approached through a variety of avenues appropriate to your field of study, interests, and particular Christian tradition. The following are some suggestions for different scriptural, systematic, anthropological, liturgical, artistic or historical approaches to help get you started. This is not an exhaustive list, so please feel free to add to it.

  Scriptural study of Mary's "pondering" in Luke 2:19 or the Magnificat in Luke 1:46-55

  Historical or systematic study of writings by the Early Church Fathers on Mary and prayer, holiness, and the interior life

  Historical study of Mary as a model of prayer and holiness in a particular tradition, such as Anglicanism

  The thoughts of Protestant reformers on Mary as a holy example

  Contemporary developments in Protestant thought and practice regarding Mary as an example of holiness for Christians, new Lutheran Marian feast days,  or ecumenical Marian celebrations such as those at the shrine in Walsingham, England on the Feast of the Assumption

  Commentary on a particular contemporary theologian or author who wrote about Marian prayer and/or Mary as an example of holiness

  The theology of particular Marian prayers

  Marian references in the liturgy

  Mary as teacher of prayer and advancement in the interior life for contemporary society

  Mary's holiness as portrayed in the visual, performing, or literary arts

Please submit proposals to the review committee at Maura.hearden@desales.edu.

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Mary in Media: Books, Films, Music, etc.

Mary 101 Kit

Get to know our spiritual mother better with information on the basic Church dogmas about Mary Immaculate, key prayers such as the Rosary, and answers to common Protestant objections to devotion to Mary. Includes 100th Anniversary of Fatima pack. Click here to order from the Marian Helpers online catalog.

Also from the Marian Fathers, please consider ordering the book, Mary, Who she is and why she matters, by Dr. Robert Stackpole, and the Mary 101 CD by Father Donald Calloway, M.I.C.

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From the Marian Treasure Chest
Brother John M. Samaha, S.M., sent us the text below with the following comments: "Remember to pray for the deceased. The article below appeared in Catholic San Francisco, November 3, 2016. May they rest in peace."
 

Remember in November by Brother John M. Samaha, S.M.

Annually the month of November reminds us to pray for our beloved deceased. At the time of death we hope the deceased go directly to heaven, but more likely they are not ready to be in God's presence immediately. The Church explains that they go to a place called purgatory to continue their purification and perfection. Consider it like a place where you wash before dinner.

On November 2, we celebrate All Souls Day and we mark the month of November as a time of special prayer for the deceased.

Some people have a childish notion of prayer. They see God as a big vending machine in the sky. Put your prayer in the slot at the top and what you want drops into the tray below. Prayer is not simply a matter of asking God for the things we want and need. At the heart of every prayer is "Thy will be done." Prayer is powerful because we join our will with God's. Through prayer we bring God's blessings on those for whom we pray. These prayers are a real help both in this world and in the next. 

Because we Catholics are an "Easter people," and believe in Jesus Christ who is "the resurrection and the life" (Jn 11:25), we know that the persons for whom we pray are not really dead. They are alive, but on the other side. Jesus died and rose again. Through our baptism we share in that eternal life. Consequently we help each other with our prayers in this life here and now as well as in the next. Not only do these graces help the souls in purgatory, they also re-echo and bring blessings to the living.

Bountiful blessings flow from a Requiem Mass and our prayers for the dead. The spiritual and psychological bonds among family members are strong. When death interrupts our love,  prayers for those who have gone before us assist in bringing closure, reconciliation, and peace to those of us who remain. 

Prayers for the dead seem morbid to some and recall black garments, gloomy mortuaries, somber organ music, and time spent at cemeteries. Actually they are very practical and should be part of our regular prayer life, not only in November.

In addition to offering Requiem Masses on anniversaries of death, remember to pray for the deceased at every Mass. Physical signs and symbols are also important: maintaining grave sites, placing flowers at grave sites, lighting candles for the deceased. These ordinary sacramentals focus on the simplicity and beauty of prayers for those who have preceded us in death. 

Moreover, prayers for the dead are a sound reminder of our own mortality. In our fast-paced, materialistic  world we tend to pretend that we are immortal. Death is something that happens to someone else somewhere else. When praying for our deceased family and friends we remember that we are passing through this temporary, earthly life, looking forward to the promised land of heaven. While we enjoy God's gifts of this life, we need to remember that we too will pass.

The Good Shepherd walks with us through this life, and through His life we will at the time of death find him and our loved ones waiting on the other side.

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Marian Events

Legion of Mary Rosary Rally

Date: Sunday, November 13, 2016, 10:35-10:55 a.m.

Location: Saint Albert the Great Catholic Parish [church basement] 3033 Far Hills Avenue, Kettering, Ohio

All are welcome to join in prayer for the deceased members of the Legion of Mary. For more information about the world-wide unity of prayer in the Legion of Mary, contact Gloria Dodd at 937-229-1431.

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Mary in the Catholic Press

Meet One of the New Recruits (Zenit) May 6, 2016

Today, twenty-three new Swiss Guards were sworn in. This week, ZENIT talked to one of the new recruits, a Swiss from the Italian canton, who commented on the emotion of being able to swear to serve the Pope and the Church.

"My name is Mauro Giovanola. I live in Briganzona near Lugano, in the canton of Ticino. I have been here in the Swiss Guard for three months and am ready to take the oath," he said, adding that joining the Guard was a personal decision which had much support from his family, his parish and his friends. He pointed out that before coming to the Vatican he attended the Recruits' School in the Swiss city of Fribourg and then decided to come to Rome...."

It is a mission that has its dangerous side, he explained: "as guards we look like guards," although what is most particular is to "work near the Holy Father every day, and although we are not always in direct contact, we attend many ceremonies where he is."

"Although we are in a barrack, we have, so to speak, our parish, with Masses on feast days and Sundays," he said. He pointed out that he was aware that every year, at the end of their service, a Swiss Guard decides to become a priest and, smiling, he added "but that's not known until the call comes...."

During some of their times on guard, for instance, they can engage in other activities and even pray the Rosary but that, he said, depends on each one.

Click here to read the complete article.

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Mary in the Secular Press

The director and editors of All About Mary under the auspices of the International Marian Research Institute do not necessarily endorse or agree with the events and ideas expressed in this feature. Our sole purpose is to report on items about Mary gleaned from a myriad of papers representing the secular press.

Dayton Film Screening Event (Saint Joseph Church Bulletin) October 30, 2016

A few years ago, the independent film, The Triumph, was screened in the area and was a big success. Now, from the same Director, comes a new feature film called Apparition Hill about an unlikely group of pilgrims who journey to the little-known village of Medjugorje. Three screenings are available at The Neon: Monday, November 21, 2016 at 7:30 pm; Thursday, December 8, 2016 at 7:30 pm; and Monday, December 12, 2016 at 7:30 pm. Tickets are $10 each and available online only at http://www.4Mary.org/movies.html. All proceeds benefit the 4Mary Youth Pilgrimage to Fatima in 2017. For more information contact info@4Mary.org by email.

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