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Living Faith through the UGMM Program

By Molly Savage, Ben Ziegler, and Liz Turnwald: Undergraduate Music Ministers

Music ministry is both beautiful and participatory. By participating in the music at Mass as an UGMM (Undergraduate Music Minister), we better understand what the liturgy truly is: a celebration! When joining in this beautiful, communal experience, we heighten and enrich our interaction with Scripture and witness our humanity become more fully divine. Using our gifts to create music helps us engage with these sacred texts and liturgical rites in a unique and formative way. As we grow in our faith and musical abilities, we are able to not only sing and play the songs but we are also able to pray with them and have a deeper connection into the Mass. As St. Augustine said, singing is praying twice!


One of the most influential parts of being an UGMM is being required to plan the music for each Mass. When music is chosen based on the readings, Scripture shapes the musical phrases and invites the congregation to let that same Scripture influence their thoughts and decisions as well. By using music in each of our own callings to be Disciples of Christ, we invite others to fully and actively participate in that same calling.


That fellowship that is shared with the congregation is also experienced within the group of UGMMs themselves. One of the greatest joys is gathering each week with your choir/ensemble to create beautiful music, goof off, praise God, and have fun! The combination of fellowship and prayer makes being an UGMM a truly amazing experience.

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