“ReZpect Our Water.” Speakers: Chief Vincent Mann and Lee McCaslin

Add to Calendar 11/15/2016 15:00:0011/15/2016 16:30:0015“ReZpect Our Water.” Speakers: Chief Vincent Mann and Lee McCaslinNative People of the Americas Colloquium 2016 November 14-15, 2016 “ReZpect Our Water” was launched internationally in the summer of 2016 as part of the Standing Rock DAPL Protest, but Native Peoples have long been at the  forefront of activism against environmental injustice. In the first segment "The Turtle Clan’s Fight for Survival from Environmental Injustice", Chief Mann will describe his tribe’s efforts to force the Ford Motor Company to renew remediation efforts at a 500-acre site it contaminated by dumping toxic materials onto the tribe’s ancestral homeland. Chief Mann will also discuss how he works to protect the tribe's land from fracking efforts and the proposed Pilgrim Pipeline. In the second segment “Oilfield Trash and the Woodlands”, McCaslin will discuss why he is now a whistle blower and activist. McCaslin travels internationally to testify as a master driller about the effects of oil and gas extraction on the environment, land-owners, communities and workers. As a Native person, his activism is also a spiritual responsibility. Chief Vincent Mann, who is the Turtle Clan Chief of the Ramapough Lunaape Nation, won the top Russ Berry Foundation Making a Difference Award in 2016. He is a  Ringwood Mines Superfund Site CAG Member and Consultant to the Environmental Studies program for Ramapo College (New Jersey) for pipeline impacts to the environment, the Ramapough Lunaape Nation and its Clans. Chief Mann has worked with NYU Environmental Medical College to develop a community based health survey. He is involved with the Two Row Wampum Campaign "Honoring Our Treaties" Pipeline Cultural, and Enviromental Monitoring of the Tennessee Gas Pipeline (ELPASO/KINDER MORGAN). He is also a consultant on the Spectra Energy line within the Ramapo Mountains, for protection of burial and sacred sites. Lee McCaslin is a Faith Keeper of the Little River Band of the Ottawa Indians, a 25 year traditional Native American Dancer, and an activist who focuses on treaty rights, water protection, and unity water and renewal ceremonies. McCaslin is also a master driller, who worked in the Oil and Gas Industry throughout the United States and Mexico for 32 years, before becoming a whistle blower.  For additional information, visit the Office of Multicultural Affairs website.Kennedy Union BallroomOffice of Multicultural Affairsmulticultural@udayton.eduNo11/15/2016

Tuesday, November 15

Time: 3 p.m. — 4:30 p.m.

Location: Kennedy Union Ballroom

Native People of the Americas Colloquium 2016
November 14-15, 2016

“ReZpect Our Water” was launched internationally in the summer of 2016 as part of
the Standing Rock DAPL Protest, but Native Peoples have long been at the 
forefront of activism against environmental injustice. In the first segment "The Turtle Clan’s Fight for Survival from Environmental Injustice", Chief Mann will describe his tribe’s efforts to force the Ford Motor Company to renew remediation efforts at a 500-acre site it contaminated by dumping toxic materials onto the tribe’s ancestral homeland. Chief Mann will also discuss how he works to protect the tribe's land from fracking efforts and the proposed Pilgrim Pipeline. In the second segment “Oilfield Trash and the Woodlands”, McCaslin will discuss why he is now a whistle blower and activist. McCaslin travels internationally to testify as a master driller about the effects of oil and gas extraction on the environment, land-owners, communities and workers. As a Native person, his activism is also a spiritual responsibility.

Chief Vincent Mann, who is the Turtle Clan Chief of the Ramapough Lunaape Nation,
won the top Russ Berry Foundation Making a Difference Award in 2016. He is a 
Ringwood Mines Superfund Site CAG Member and Consultant to the Environmental Studies program for Ramapo College (New Jersey) for pipeline impacts to the environment, the Ramapough Lunaape Nation and its Clans. Chief Mann has worked with NYU Environmental Medical College to develop a community based health survey. He is involved with the Two Row Wampum Campaign "Honoring Our Treaties" Pipeline Cultural, and Enviromental Monitoring of the Tennessee Gas Pipeline (ELPASO/KINDER MORGAN). He is also a consultant on the Spectra Energy line within the Ramapo Mountains, for protection of burial and sacred sites.

Lee McCaslin is a Faith Keeper of the Little River Band of the Ottawa Indians, a 25 year traditional Native American Dancer, and an activist who focuses on treaty rights, water protection, and unity water and renewal ceremonies. McCaslin is also a master driller, who worked in the Oil and Gas Industry throughout the United States and Mexico for 32 years, before becoming a whistle blower. 

For additional information, visit the Office of Multicultural Affairs website.

Contact Information:

Name:  Office of Multicultural Affairs
Website:  https://www.udayton.edu/studev/dean/oma/programs/native_peoples_celebration.php
Phone:  937-229-3634
Email:  multicultural@udayton.edu