“The Standing Rock Nation vs the Dakota Access Pipeline: Context.” Speakers: Linda and Luke Black Elk

Add to Calendar 11/15/2016 13:00:0011/15/2016 14:30:0015“The Standing Rock Nation vs the Dakota Access Pipeline: Context.” Speakers: Linda and Luke Black ElkNative People of the Americas Colloquium 2016 November 14-15, 2016 The Dakota Access pipeline has become a rallying point for those concerned about water quality and water rights. The Sacred Stone Camp protests however are also about sacred sites, treaty rights, and food sovereignty. Linda and Luke Black Elk will explore all of these issues, and give details about how, no matter where you live, you can take action to Stand with Standing Rock. Linda Black Elk Linda (Catawba Nation) is an ethnobotanist specializing in teaching about culturally important plants and their uses as food and medicine. Linda works to protect food sovereignty, traditional plant knowledge, and environmental quality as an extension of the fight against the Dakota Access pipeline on the Standing Rock Nation. Linda has written for numerous publications is the author of “Watoto Unyutapi”, which is a field guide to edible wild plants of the Dakota people. Linda is the mother to three Lakota boys an instructor at Sitting Bull College. Luke Black Elk (Thítȟuŋwaŋ Lakota) is a storyteller, grassroots activist, and traditional spiritualist. He has conducted research in water restoration, fire ecology, sustainable building design, and food sovereignty. He hopes to use these techniques to encourage a more traditional way of life among his people. Along with his duties as a Sundance leader and practitioner of the seven sacred rites of the Lakota, Luke is a student of environmental sciences at Sitting Bull College in Fort Yates, ND.Kennedy Union BallroomOffice of Multicultural Affairsmulticultural@udayton.eduNo11/15/2016

Tuesday, November 15

Time: 1 p.m. — 2:30 p.m.

Location: Kennedy Union Ballroom

Native People of the Americas Colloquium 2016
November 14-15, 2016

The Dakota Access pipeline has become a rallying point for those concerned about
water quality and water rights. The Sacred Stone Camp protests however are also about
sacred sites, treaty rights, and food sovereignty. Linda and Luke Black Elk will explore all of these issues, and give details about how, no matter where you live, you can take action to Stand with Standing Rock.

Linda Black Elk Linda (Catawba Nation) is an ethnobotanist specializing in teaching
about culturally important plants and their uses as food and medicine. Linda works to
protect food sovereignty, traditional plant knowledge, and environmental quality as an extension of the fight against the Dakota Access pipeline on the Standing Rock Nation.
Linda has written for numerous publications is the author of “Watoto Unyutapi”,
which is a field guide to edible wild plants of the Dakota people. Linda is the mother to three Lakota boys an instructor at Sitting Bull College.

Luke Black Elk (Thítȟuŋwaŋ Lakota) is a storyteller, grassroots activist, and traditional spiritualist. He has conducted research in water restoration, fire ecology, sustainable building design, and food sovereignty. He hopes to use these techniques to encourage a more traditional way of life among his people. Along with his duties as a Sundance leader and practitioner of the seven sacred rites of the Lakota, Luke is a student of environmental sciences at Sitting Bull College in Fort Yates, ND.

Contact Information:

Name:  Office of Multicultural Affairs
Website:  https://www.udayton.edu/studev/dean/oma/programs/native_peoples_celebration.php
Phone:  937-229-3634
Email:  multicultural@udayton.edu