Thursday Seminars

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“Hidden Gems” in the Gem City Area - NEW

This is your chance to learn about some local “hidden gems” which are unique to the Dayton area. Learn the history and intriguing features of these lesser-known museums and special collections you may not have discovered. Presentations on some “gems” will be held at the Daniel J. Curran Place (formerly River Campus), while field trips will be made to others. The first session will be held at the Daniel J. Curran Place.

September 20, 2018 Dayton International Peace Museum
The mission of the Dayton International Peace Museum is to inspire a local, national, and international culture of peace.

September 27, 2018 The Marian Library
The Marian Library was founded to make the Blessed Virgin Mary better known, loved, and served. Included in the library are over 3,500 crèches from nations around the globe.

October 4, 2018 U.S. Catholic Special Collections
The U.S. Catholic Special Collections preserves records of the Catholic Church and Catholic life in the U.S. Special Collections include rare books as well as early and limited-edition books like Salvador Dali’s illustrated Alice in Wonderland and Divine Comedy. Special Collections highlight sports, the arts, politics, and the pursuits of UD alumni.

October 11, 2018 Mound Cold War Discovery Center
The Discovery Center reveals the secret history of Mound Laboratory and its significant contributions to national security during the tense years of the Cold War, the Nuclear Age, and the Space Race.

October 18, 2018 Centerville-Washington History
The Historical Society of Centerville and Washington Township preserves and shares local history of the community with three museums as well as school and community education programs.

October 25, 2018 American Sign Museum of Cincinnati
Take a trip down Memory Lane with many iconic signs from your childhood, from businesses large and small, including the original Frisch’s Big Boy (with slingshot) to a single-arch 1963 McDonald’s sign from Huntsville, Alabama and 200 others.

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25
9:30–11:30 a.m., Daniel J. Curran Place and various locations

Carol Bucklew is a long-term member of UDOLLI, a past advisory board member, and currently a consultant.

 

Sci-Fi Movies: Alien Encounter Communications - NEW

Communicating with beings from another planet can be tricky. Do they communicate in the same way we do? How does their world view affect the way they communicate? Does a desire to communicate mean they are friendly? Will we be friendly to them? Explore this common sci-fi theme through 5 films viewed over six weeks. Films currently on tap are The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Contact, Arrival, and E. T.: The Extraterrestrial. Discussion will follow the films.

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25 9:30–11:30 a.m., Daniel J. Curran Place

Janet Hess taught junior and senior high school social studies and English classes for 36 years, finishing her career at Oakwood City schools. She received her undergraduate degree from Bowling Green State University and her master’s degree from Wright State University. She is a member of Syzygy Science Fiction Book Club and Delta Kappa Gamma Society International, an honorary society for women educators.

 

Confronting the Unthinkable Through Literature - NEW

Participants in the seminar will review and discuss selected works of writers, theologians, historians, and survivor/witnesses who have for decades examined the implications of The Holocaust as a defining moment in the history of the 20th century.

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25 9:30–11:30 a.m., Daniel J. Curran Place
Seminar limit: 20

Bob Thum is a retired teacher, educating students for 30 years in the Mad River School District. In 1987, Bob was appointed by Governor Celeste to serve on the Governor’s Commission on Holocaust education. He received a study fellowship from The American Gathering of Holocaust Survivors and attended that organization’s study programs in Israel and in Washington, DC. His work To Save A People; To Build a Nation-The Media Campaign to Save the Jews of Europe and Establish a Jewish Homeland is included in the American Jewish Archives collection at Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati.

 

Godly Play—A Spiritual Practice that Explores the Mystery of God’s Presence in our Lives - NEW

The Godly Play curriculum engages what is most exiting about religious education. God inviting us into—and pursuing us in—scripture and spiritual experience. Godly Play practice teaches us to listen for God and to make authentic and creative responses to God’s call in our lives. Godly Play is a creative, imaginative approach to Christian formation and spiritual practice. Godly Play has a Montessori foundation with 40+ years of research and practice. Godly Play values process, openness, discovery, community,  and relationships. Godly Play models the worship life, stories, symbols and rituals of Christian congregations. Godly Play allows practitioners to make relevant and personal theological meaning. Godly Play nurtures participants to larger dimensions of belief and faith through wondering and play. Godly Play prepares children to self-regulate, to deal with life challenges and speak out and ask for help when needed. They manage their own feeling and adopt a positive approach to mental health. Godly Play incorporates Spirituality, Love, Generosity, Patience, Mutual Respect and Tolerance.

6 Thursdays September 20 – October 25
9:30 – 11:30 a.m. This seminar is held at the John W. Moore Center, McKinley United Methodist Church, 196 Hawthorn Ave.

Deb Eglofis the Educational Consultant to more than 140 United Methodist Churches in the Greater Montgomery County area. A graduate of Purdue University and the United Theological Seminary, Deb has more than two decades of experience in child-centered spirituality along with 17 years at the historic Christ Kettering United Methodist Church in Kettering.

 

Touring MetroParks: Little Known Histories

Take a look at some of the great sites within MetroParks and learn about their histories, not only when they first joined the system, but how certain features came to be and why they are significant within the history of the Dayton area. You’ll also be amazed by the beauty and wide variety among the parks. Come, learn, and ENJOY! Each site will be presented by the site leader or manager and a walking tour will follow. Please dress for the weather.

September 20, Cox Arboretum MetroPark, Visitor Center, 6733 N. Springboro Pike, Dayton, OH 45449

September 27, Wegerzyn Gardens MetroPark, Main Building Entrance, 1301 E. Siebenthaler Avenue, Dayton, OH 45414

October 4, Woodman Fen, Main Entrance, 2409 Newcastle Drive, Dayton, OH 45420

October 11, Sugarcreek MetroPark, Main Entrance, 4178 Conference Road, Bellbrook, OH 45305

October 18, Hills and Dales MetroPark, Paw Paw Shelter, 100 Deep Hollow Road, Kettering, OH 45409

October 25, No Seminar

November 1, Carriage Hill, Visitor Center, 7800 E. Shull Road, Dayton, OH 45424 6 Thursdays September 20–November 1 (No seminar on October 25) 12:30–2:30 p.m., Various Parks

Betty Hoevel is education coordinator for Five Rivers MetroParks. She oversees adult horticulture programming at Cox, Wegerzyn, and Aullwood, as well as programming youth experiences at the Children’s Discovery Garden at Wegerzyn.

 

Movement and Nutrition Guidelines for Successful, Healthy Aging - NEW

What should I eat? What kind of exercise is right for me? These two questions will be explored and common sense guidelines presented to help with all of the conflicting information in our world. Ellie Shulman, IIN health coach and Lori Kelch, community health educator will lend their expertise to this seminar along with Becky. We will be active during the sessions so please dress accordingly.

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25
12:30–2:30 p.m., Personally Fit, 3578 Kettering Blvd. Seminar limit: 15
Recommended Text: Food: What the heck should I eat? Mark Hyman, MS available on Amazon for $20

Becky Cobb is the founder of Personally Fit, a Dayton based personal training and wellness center. Becky is certified thru ACSM as a fitness consultant and IIN as a health coach. Working in the fitness industry over 30 years has given her much experience in helping people get and stay healthy and fit. On- going education is a core value for Becky and her business, UDOLLI “fits” right in!

 

The History of Classical Music Part 3

We will continue with the romantic era (1825-1900) and study the works of Wagner, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, and the Russian “five” or “mighty handful”: Rimsky-Korsakov, Borodin, Mussorgsky, Balakirev, and Cui. Biographies of the composers will be presented as well as examples of their works through CDs and DVDs.

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25 12:30–2:30 p.m., Daniel J. Curran Place

Franklin Lewis has a B.A. in English Literature from Case Western University and a J.D. from The Ohio State College of Law. Following graduation from Law School, he served as an attorney for 3 years in the Air Force. He then practiced public utilities law for 38 years in Cleveland. He was on the Board of the Cleveland Institute of Music (1988-96) and currently serves on the Boards of UDOLLI and The Dayton Performing Art Alliance.

 

Introduction to Apple iPhone

This seminar is for beginning-level Apple iPhone users who want to learn more about the features of this remarkable smart phone. Topics covered will include instructions and tips on how to use many of the basic features that are standard on every iPhone (Messages, Calendar, Contacts, Settings, Maps, Control Center, Camera, Photos, and the App Store). All participants must bring an iPhone (6 or later) updated with the latest operating system (iOS) to each session.

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25 12:30–2:30 p.m., Daniel J. Curran Place
Seminar limit: 20

John Bramhall retired from the Ohio Air National Guard. He is active in the Dayton area ballroom dance community, a former computer programmer, and long-time iPhone, iPad, and Mac user.

 

A New Look at the Old Testament

So what’s all the fuss about the Old Testament? Who wrote it and what stories does it tell? When was it written and for what audience? What does it have to say to us in the 21st century? Or does it have anything to say? Join with us to explore these ancient writings. Learn more about them and what they were saying to the people of ancient Israel as well as what they might be saying to YOU. Be sure to bring your Bible to seminar for these discussions. You might want to look through your Bible and become more familiar with what it contains beyond the Old and the New Testaments before seminar begins.

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25 12:30–2:30 p.m., Daniel J. Curran Place
Required Text: The only BOOK you need will be your copy of the Old Testament as found in your Bible: check with your minister, if you are not sure. The Good News Bible and the Living Bible are not helpful because they are NOT translations of the original Greek texts.

CarolAnn Cannon is a research chemist who has developed a new interest in theology over the past 35 years. She received her M.A. in Theological Studies here at UD in 1986 and is certified as both a catechist and a catechetical leader by the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Her seminars with UDOLLI have included Christian History: 3 separate seminars; WHO do you say that I am -- a Christology, The Crusades. the Barbarians and the so-called Dark Ages, The Papacy and the Bishops of Rome as well as Bible Basics: The Old and The New Testaments.

 

Conquest and Conflict of the Frontier - NEW

The frontier experience has been an important part of American culture. This seminar will focus on the turbulent evolution of the Western United States. The conquistadors, explorers, fur traders, and missionaries were followed by the emigrant wagon trains and the gold and silver miners. Native conflicts soon developed with the indigenous peoples. Conflicts also arose between the new settlers. Bleeding Kansas that led to Civil War and the forgotten battlefields of the western frontier will be examined. The frontier experience resulted in the uniquely American characteristics of opportunity, individualism, and democracy.

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25 12:30–2:30 p.m., Daniel J. Curran Place

Paul Cooper is a retired Air Force pilot that grew up in and spent most of his life in Seattle and on the West Coast. He has always had a fascination with western history. He is a graduate of the University of Washington and has a master’s degree in history.

 

African American Music, History and Culture - NEW

The African musical and cultural aesthetic has had an indelible impact on the formation of America’s contemporary music soundtrack and popular culture. We will closely examine the intersection of race, class, and gender as they pertain to the emergence of different sounds including Atlantic, Philly, Stax, Motown, and Buddha, as well as gospel music in traditions such as Catholic, Method- ist, Baptist, Church of God in Christ, Full Gospel, and the holiness movement. Special focus will be on those African American musical artists who responded musically to the civil rights movement. Students will learn the history of gospel via lectures, videos and (yes) singing. Indeed, each session concludes with a gospel concert; people from a myriad of cultures will offer the healing sounds that resonate from songs in the key of Life.

6 Thursdays (and Tuesdays) September 20 – October 30 
Please note: seminar held twice a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Begins on Thursday, September 20th.
12:30 – 2:30 p.m. This seminar is held at the John W. Moore Center, McKinley United Methodist Church, 196 Hawthorn Ave.

Jeremy Scott Winston, a Philadelphia, Pennsylvania native, graduated from Oakwood University in 2001 with a bachelor of arts degree in music, and from Morgan State University in 2003 with a master of arts degree. He currently serves as Assistant Professor of Music and Chorus Director of the acclaimed Central State University Chorus at Central State University. Since starting in 2013, Jeremy continues the great tradition of this Chorus as ambassadors of the great black choral tradition. The inaugural choral concert featured six-time Grammy Award nominee, Karen Sheard. The Chorus has already received three invitations to perform abroad, including a performance with the Czech Symphony Orchestra in Prague, Czech Republic.

 

Fifty Years of Celebrating Our Rivers - NEW

Fifty years ago, Ohio pioneered the nation’s River Preservation Movement with the passage of the first Scenic Rivers Act. This legislation created a state program to protect Ohio’s remaining high-quality streams for future generations. Congress followed later that year in October by passing The National Scenic Rivers Act. In the five decades since Ohio’s act was approved, 14 rivers have been designated as wild, scenic, and recreational rivers. In Southwest Ohio, the Little Miami River was the first to be designated as a National and State Scenic River. Join us as we learn about these beautiful rivers and streams in southwest Ohio. We will examine the efforts of several governments, private organizations, and citizen groups to maintain, preserve and restore our rivers to their natural condition. The first two sessions will be held on the River Campus, Curran Place. The remaining six sessions will be held at field locations in the Great Miami and Little Miami Watersheds. Transportation to and from will be on your own. Moderate walking may be required to access interesting features at each location and restroom facilities will be available.

8 Thursdays September 20–November 8
3:00–5:00 p.m., Daniel J. Curran Place and various other locations

Mike Schumacher retired from Wright-Patterson AFB after serving 36 years as a lab researcher and environmental manager for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). He is the co-founder of the Little Miami Watershed Network, an Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist, a member of Dayton History at Carillon Historical Park, and a volunteer at the Woodland Cemetery and Arboretum. In July 2017, he was honored by the Warren County Soil and Water Conservation District as the Conservationist of the Year. He also offers Historical Gardening seminars at the Patterson Homestead each spring.

 

Creating Beautiful Holiday Cards - NEW

During this seminar, we will learn techniques to make holiday cards to send to family and friends. A different stamping/paper crafting technique will be taught each week and applied to produce four Holiday cards. Religious and secular options will be available so that each person’s creation is unique and personally appropriate.

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25 3:00–5:00 p.m., Daniel J. Curran Place
Seminar limit: 20
Required Materials: Student should bring a basic tool kit that includes scissors, small ruler, bone folder, adhesives or 2-sided tape, and pencil. All other materials will be provided.

Bobbye Goetz is a paper-craft enthusiast. She teaches paper-crafting and stamping seminars and holds a retreat each summer for making fun paper crafts and cards. She has won first and second place ribbons at the Ohio State Fair in the Creative Arts Division for her greeting cards and other paper projects. Bobbye has a master’s degree in education.

 

Shakespeare: Plays, Sonnets and Songs - NEW

A little bit of film and video analysis will be learned and applied to versions of Othello, The Comedy of Errors and Julie Taymor’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. (Titles subject to change.) We’ll spice up seminars with looks at selected Shakespeare’s Sonnets (some are rather risqué) and Songs. Participants are encouraged to bring food and drink so that we may all, in our discussions, “Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.”

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25 3:00–5:00 p.m., Daniel J. Curran Place
Seminar limit: 25
Recommended Text: online copies of the plays and sonnets, with commentary (free on Spark Notes/Side-by-Side Shakespeare). Or “The Riverside Shakespeare,” cheap used at AbeBooks or Amazon; often in area used bookstores for around $10.

Tom Clark is a UD grad who loves to tell people they can actually make a living with majors in English and Latin. He particularly enjoys immersing himself in Shakespeare and his times.

 

Financial Success in Retirement

Many retirees are searching for strategies to help maximize income and minimize the risk of running out of money after their working years. Join us for informative discussions on topics including finding yield in the current low interest rate environment, the value of dividends in retirement, protecting assets through proper estate planning, maximizing Social Security retirement benefits, and establishing a spending policy that balances your desired lifestyle with preserving assets for a retirement that could last over 30 years.

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25 3:00–5:00 p.m., Daniel J. Curran Place

Dan Johnson serves as Vice President and Wealth Management Advisor with the RDMJB Group at Merrill Lynch & Co located at Austin Landing. He focuses on partnering with individuals and their families to implement successful retirement strategies. Dan is a Business Finance graduate of the University of Florida and has obtained the Certified Financial Planner™ (CFP®) designation.

 

Service Dogs for Children: The Magic of 4 Paws for Ability - NEW

4 Paws for Ability places service dogs with children and veterans with disabilities. This four week seminar will cover:

Session 1: History and overview of 4 Paws for Ability 
Session 2: The training process from birth to placement 
Session 3: Types of service dogs trained
Session 4: How you can help; accepting the use of service dogs in your community

4 Thursdays September 20–October 11 3:00–5:00 p.m., Daniel J. Curran Place
Seminar Limit: 20

Kalynn Clark is the Director of Volunteer Engagement at 4 Paws for Ability. She has a B.S. from Grace College.

 

Conquest and Conflict of the Frontier - NEW

The frontier experience has been an important part of American culture. This seminar will focus on the turbulent evolution of the Western United States. The conquistadors, explorers, fur traders, and missionaries were followed by the emigrant wagon trains and the gold and silver miners. Native conflicts soon developed with the indigenous peoples. Conflicts also arose between the new settlers. Bleeding Kansas which led to Civil War and the forgotten battlefields of the western frontier will be examined. The frontier experience resulted in the uniquely American characteristics of opportunity, individualism, and democracy.

6 Thursdays September 20–October 25 3:00–5:00 p.m., Daniel J. Curran Place

Paul Cooper is a retired Air Force pilot that grew up in and spent most of his life in Seattle and on the West Coast. He has always had a fascination with western history. He is a graduate of the University of Washington and has a master’s degree in history.

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