Scott Howland

Contact Information

Scott Howland

Doctoral Student

  • Graduate Assistant

Profile

Scott's primary research interests focus on the history of monasticism and its related spiritualities; the sacramentality of the natural world; and the use of art, music, and literature as vehicles for theological discourse. His master's thesis examined the relevance of early Christian monastic spirituality, with a particular focus on the desert fathers and mothers of fourth century Egypt, to the contemporary Christian response to climate change. 

Degrees

  • M.A. Theological Studies, University of Dayton
  • B.A. Psychology, Holy Cross College

Scholarly Publications and Presentations

PUBLICATIONS

"Ontological Ecology: The Created World in Early Christian Monastic Spirituality." Master's thesis, University of Dayton, 2017.

PRESENTATIONS

"Ontological Ecology: The Created World in Early Christian Monastic Spirituality." "The Word for World Is Forest: Mindscapes and Landscapes of Religious Practice" Panel Presentation, American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting. Ball State University, 2017.