Scott Howland

Contact Information

Scott Howland

Doctoral Student

  • Teaching Assistant

Profile

Scott's primary research interests focus on the history of monasticism and its related spiritualities; environmental ethics and the sacramentality of the natural world; and the use of art, music, and literature as vehicles for theological discourse, especially in the work of J.R.R. Tolkien. His master's thesis examined the relevance of early Christian monastic spirituality, with a particular focus on the desert fathers and mothers of fourth century Egypt, to the contemporary Christian response to climate change.

Degrees

  • M.A. Theological Studies, University of Dayton
  • B.A. Psychology, Holy Cross College

Scholarly Publications and Presentations

PUBLICATIONS

"Ontological Ecology: The Created World in Early Christian Monastic Spirituality." Master's thesis, University of Dayton, 2017.

PRESENTATIONS

"Ontological Ecology: The Created World in Early Christian Monastic Spirituality." "The Word for World Is Forest: Mindscapes and Landscapes of Religious Practice" Panel Presentation, American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting. Ball State University, 2017.