Wednesday February 15, 2006

Local Council Honors Three in the Sciences

The Affiliate Societies Council consists of representatives of approximately 50 engineering and science-related professional societies in Dayton whose combined membership exceeds 15,000.

The Affiliate Societies Council of Dayton will present two University of Dayton faculty members and a researcher with an Outstanding Engineers and Scientists Award at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 2, in Sinclair Community College's Ponitz Center, Building 12.

The honorees are:

Mike O'Hare, physics department chair, for education: O'Hare has worked at UD for almost 30 years and is the longest tenured program chair in the College of Arts and Sciences. Since becoming chair, he has worked on education initiatives such as the development of the general education curriculum in the sciences and the development of the electro-optics graduate program that involves close collaboration with the School of Engineering and the UD Research Institute. He was one of the principal investigators on a NASA-sponsored grant to design curricula for developing scientific literacy in pre-service teachers. "The most exciting thing about an academic career is the opportunity to teach and interact with students," O'Hare says on his faculty Web page.

Liming Dai, Wright Brothers Institute endowed chair in nanomaterials, for research: Dai joined UD in 2004 to further UD's world-class research in carbon nanomaterials and multifunctional polymers and expand nanomaterials research and education in Dayton. Mickey McCabe, UD's vice president for research and executive director of the Research Institute, said the work of Dai, his colleages and his students will have considerable impact regionally and nationally by helping create an internationally recognized center of excellence in nanomaterials in Dayton. Dai is the first chair to be funded and appointed in the WBI program, designed to build chair-driven pockets of science and technology across Ohio.

John Grant, distinguished research scientist, research: Grant's work enabled Auger electron spectroscopy to evolve from a laboratory curiosity in the late 1960s to a routinely used tool to determine the composition of the outermost few atomic layers of materials. Grant has been North American editor of the international journal Surface and Interface Analysis since 1986. He also co-edited a 900-page book Surface Analysis by Auger and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and wrote some of the book's 31 chapters and 11 appendices. He has published more than 100 journal articles.

The Affiliate Societies Council consists of representatives of approximately 50 engineering and science-related professional societies in Dayton whose combined membership exceeds 15,000.

The mission of the council is to provide professional and educational opportunities for the general engineering and scientific communities and to offer career guidance in various engineering and science fields.

Joe Saliba, UD School of Engineering dean, won an award in 2004.

For more information, contact Shawn Robinson at (937) 229-3391.