Monday March 20, 2006

Celebrating Academic Excellence

The University of Dayton will celebrate academic excellence at the 18th annual Stander Symposium April 4-5. A keynote address by primatologist Jane Goodall and a Celebration of the Arts on the stage of the Victoria Theatre are among the highlights.

The University of Dayton will celebrate academic excellence at the 18th annual Stander Symposium April 4-5. A keynote address by primatologist Jane Goodall and a Celebration of the Arts on the stage of the Victoria Theatre are among the highlights of an agenda that is packed with presentations, poster sessions, panel discussions and performances. It's envisioned as the academic equivalent to UD's popular community service event, "Christmas on Campus."

The Celebration of the Arts and Goodall's keynote address are free and open to the public, though tickets are required. Order online here.

The Celebration of the Arts is slated from 7:30 to 9 p.m. on Tuesday, April 4, in the Victoria Theatre. Herbert Woodward Martin, UD's poet-in-residence and professor emeritus of English, will serve as master of ceremonies, which will include UD student performances in music, visual arts, theater and dance.

Goodall, chimpanzee expert and conservationist, will present the University of Dayton Stander Symposium's keynote address, "Reason for Hope," from 9:30 to 11:15 a.m. on Wednesday, April 5, in the Thomas J. Frericks Athletic and Convocation Center.

Best known for her definitive study of chimpanzees in Tanzania's Gombe National Park, Goodall is recognized throughout the world for her environmental conservation efforts. She was named by Queen Elizabeth as a Dame of the British Empire, was selected by UN Secretary General Kofi Annan as one of 10 United Nations Messengers of Peace, and she was recently inducted into the French Legion of Honor. She has been featured in numerous television specials and an IMAX film.

Goodall, who turns 72 on April 3, travels an average of 300 days per year, speaking about threats facing chimpanzees, environmental crises and her reasons for hope that the human race will remedy the problems it has imposed on Earth. She bases her reasons for hope on the problem-solving abilities of the human brain, the determination of young people, the indomitable human spirit and the resilience of nature -- all factors that can be harnessed to ensure the survival of life on Earth. She continually urges her audiences to recognize their personal responsibility and ability to effect change through consumer action, lifestyle change and activism.

Goodall, who holds a Ph.D. in ethology from Cambridge University, is the author of The Chimpanzees of Gombe: Patterns of Behavior (Harvard University Press, 1986) and more than 20 other books, including a best selling memoir, Reason for Hope. Her most recent book is Harvest for Hope: A Guide to Mindful Eating.

She is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute based in Arlington, Va., which works to protect chimpanzees and their habitats and has established community-centered conservation and development programs for villages in several African countries. The JGI Roots & Shoots education program, with groups in more than 90 countries, motivates youth from kindergarten through college through projects that benefit people, animals and the environment.

For more information about all Stander Symposium events, click here.

Contact Amber Rose, academic events coordinator, at (937) 229-5363.