Wednesday November 29, 2006

Titanium Expert Receives Boeing Fellowship

One of the world's most efficient, longest-range commercial planes may include a little bit of the University of Dayton when it flies next year.

One of the world's most efficient, longest-range commercial planes may include a little bit of the University of Dayton when it flies next year.

Danny Eylon, an international titanium expert and UD's materials engineering graduate chair, will be on the front lines of the Boeing 787's development process during an eight-week summer fellowship with the company.

Titanium has regained importance in aviation with the Boeing 787, according to Eylon. who also has consulted for many major U.S. aerospace companies and the U.S. State Department. Titanium doesn't corrode like the more commonly used aluminum when attached to composites containing carbon fibers.

The Boeing fellowship provides faculty with a better understanding of how Boeing applies university research to its planes. Boeing hopes that information is shared to better prepare today's students for engineering, information technology and business careers.

In turn, Boeing asks the program participants to use their expertise to offer suggestions on improving how Boeing does business.

An average of 12 faculty from all U.S. universities are picked yearly for the program.

"It's good to get to the machine shop floor to get the feeling and appreciation for the receiving end of technologies we develop in the lab," Eylon said. "I'm looking forward to the opportunity to see first-hand the implementation of state-of-the-art titanium alloys, which I have been working on for 30 years."

Eylon will spend four weeks at Boeing in Seattle and two weeks each in Long Beach, Calif., and St. Louis at Boeing's commercial, aerospace and military divisions, respectively.

Reported by the Associated Press and The New York Times, Eylon was among the experts who debunked what was believed to be the bone box of Jesus' brother, James. Eylon also was a guest on The History Channel's "Modern Marvels" to discuss Bible technology.

For more information, contact Shawn Robinson at 937-229-3391.