Friday January 26, 2007

Litany of Loreto Featured

The University of Dayton's Marian Library will display a new multi-media exhibit on the Litany of Loreto, a well-known traditional prayer to Mary, the mother of Jesus, from Feb. 1 to March 22.

Composed during the Middle Ages, the litany is a chant-like prayer that explores many different portrayals of Mary such as saint, mother, virgin, helper and queen. Using each of 44 different aspects, the prayer is typically recited as a question/response chant.

The library's exploration of the prayer centers around enlargements of copper engravings created by Josef Sebastian Klauber and accompanied by music from Wolfgang Mozart whose "Litaniae Lauretanae" was inspired by Klauber's work.

The Klauber images, from a 1768 book in the library's collection, will also be on the Web at http://campus.udayton.edu/mary/current-exhibit.html.

The display features large depictions of the pages from the book provided by Mary Pop of the Society for the Preservation of Roman Catholic Heritage, accompanied by explanations of the litany's symbolism.

The Rev. Johann Roten, S.M., director of the International Marian Research Institute at UD, noted, "If you want to understand a period, you need to experience the arts – all of them – religious expression as well. This exhibit helps illuminate the 18th century through visual art, music and faith."

After the display closes March 22, the pieces will be available as a traveling exhibit to churches, schools and galleries.

The Marian Library is an international center for study and research on Mary, located on the seventh floor of the Roesch Library, just off Stewart Street, on UD's main campus. It holds the world's largest collection of printed material about Mary.

The library is open Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday by appointment. There is no cost. Call 937-229-4214 or go to http://campus.udayton.edu/mary/ for more information.

For more information, contact M. Jean Frisk, S.S.M at 937-229-4254 or friskjem@notes.udayton.edu.