Tuesday March 18, 2008

How to Navigate the Chinese Intellectual Property Puzzle

Some say rapid economic development can take place despite limited intellectual property protection. Others say intellectual property protection should come first. China has presented a puzzle to those who study this link.

American companies doing business in China face the choice of first navigating China's evolving intellectual property laws or its evolving economic development.

The founding director of Drake University's Intellectual Property Law Center, Peter Yu, will offer his guidance on this issue from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, April 7, during a dinner and presentation at the University of Dayton School of Law.

Yu has spoken at events organized by the World Intellectual Property Organization, the International Telecommunication Union, the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development and the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

"Commentators often link intellectual property protection with economic development. Some commentators consider China a model case for showing that rapid economic development can take place despite limited intellectual property protection. Others have noted gradual improvements in the Chinese intellectual property system as the country became more economically developed," said Kelly Henrici, director of the University of Dayton School of Law's Program in Law and Technology. "China thus far has presented a puzzle to those who study this link."

The cost is $50 for "Intellectual Property, Economic Development and the China Puzzle." The fee includes dinner and the seminar. Continuing legal education credit approval from the Ohio Commission on CLE for an hour of general credit is pending. For more information and to register, contact Carole Wiltsee at 937-229-4676 or visit the related link.

For more information, contact Shawn Robinson, associate director of media relations, at 937-229-3391 or srobinson@udayton.edu.