Tuesday September 28, 2010

Native Peoples Celebration

The University of Dayton will celebrate native peoples in the Americas and beyond with three days of presentations, performances and activities.

The University of Dayton continues the tradition of intercultural and interfaith dialogue in an upcoming series, featuring three days of presentations, performances and activities celebrating the diversity and unity of native peoples in the Americas and beyond.

"Native Peoples Celebrate the Human Nation 2010," is scheduled for Oct. 14-16 at various locations on campus. General sessions are free and open to the public, although an Oct. 15 luncheon is $10 for non-University of Dayton participants with registration required by Sept. 29. Traditional arts and crafts will be sold throughout the days' events.

Many times, the stories of native peoples are told by members of the dominant culture, who observe from their own, often European, western perspective, said Mary Anne Angel, director of the University's Circle of Light Program, which coordinates the annual event.

"But for the most part, these well-intentioned outsiders create and perpetuate enduring misrepresentations and stereotypes," she said.

The Circle of Light Program, now in its 10th year, works to counter these stereotypes, raise awareness, generate long-term reciprocal relationships and create dialogue among native peoples and the dominant culture. Native peoples celebrations offer diverse cultures forums to represent their perspectives and experiences in their own voices, both in traditional and contemporary forms, Angel said.

"A lot of participants, performers, organizations and individuals keep coming back and help make this possible," she said. "We have become a family. We call ourselves a 'tiospaye' ¿ it's a Lakota word that means extended family. We share resources and do collaborative things yearlong in terms of events and community outreach. That's the whole purpose: it's not the week, it's what happens after that week."

Schedule of events (download the pdf):

Thursday, Oct. 14
5-7:30 p.m., Sears Recital Hall: Music and Literature of the Americas: Forms of Cultural Identity and Self-Determinism. This session discusses the power of music and literature in developing cultural identity.

Friday, Oct. 15
10 a.m. to noon, Kennedy Union Torch Lounge:
Women¿s Perspectives on Feminism from the Abrahamic Faiths. Moderated by Angela Griffin Jones.

Noon to 1 p.m., Women's Center, 212 Alumni Hall: A Gathering of Clouds: Luncheon and Performance featuring Gali: Alicia Pagan and Raymond Two Crows Wallen. The cost is $10 for non-University of Dayton participants. Please register by Sept. 29.

1-2 p.m., Women's Center, 212 Alumni Hall: Finding our Voices ¿ Healing Ourselves. Moderated by author Pamela Ferris-Olson. Ferris-Olson and Nancy Scott will explore the importance of heritage and traditions in finding voice and healing.

2-4 p.m., Women's Center, 212 Alumni Hall: When We Cannot Find the Words: Expressing our Voice through the Arts. Moderated by Nancy L. Scott.

4-5 p.m., Sears Recital Hall: By Whose Definition Did We Become Indians? Moderated by Guy W. Jones.

Saturday, Oct. 16
Performances will be held on the Central Mall 11 a.m. until the closing ceremony at 5 p.m. Evening performances will take place in Kennedy Union Ballroom. In case of rain, daytime performances will be moved to Virginia W. Kettering Residence Hall rooms G11 and G13.

11 a.m. to noon and 7-7:30 p.m.: Raymond Roach and the Lakota drum group Many Voice Singers.

Noon to 1 p.m. and 7:30-8 p.m.: Elba Alicia Pagan, Raymond Two Crows Wallen and Leon Briggs.

1-2 p.m. and 8-8:30 p.m.: Grassroots group Memories of Africa.

2-3 p.m.: Flutist John DeBoer.

3-4 p.m. and 8:30-9 p.m.: White Mountain Apache Laura Ortman.

4-5 p.m. and 9-9:30 p.m.: Irish-American Deni Wilson.

For more information on the event, contact Mary Anne Angel at Mary.Angel@notes.udayton.edu.

For more information, contact Meagan Pant, assistant director of media relations, at 937-229-3256 or mpant1@udayton.edu.

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