Tuesday October 11, 2011

Native Peoples Celebration

Intercultural and interfaith dialogue continues with the University's series celebrating the diversity and unity of native people.

The University of Dayton continues the tradition of intercultural and interfaith dialogue in an upcoming series, featuring four days of presentations, performances and activities celebrating the diversity and unity of native peoples in the Americas and beyond.

"Native Peoples Celebration 2011: Building Right Relationships," is scheduled for Oct. 10-14 at various locations on campus. General sessions are free and open to the public.

The event will focus on the spirit of dialogue and building relationships between Native Americans and people on campus, said Mary Anne Angel, director of the University's Circle of Light Program, which coordinates the annual event.

One opportunity participants will have to build these relationships is through "Two Modern Day Medicine Stories," a healing event honoring veterans. Led by clinical therapist Shianne Eagleheart and Nancy Scott, who works for healing/trauma organization OneFeather Consulting, the discussion will focus on post-traumatic stress disorder and how it affects native peoples.

"It's not only giving voice and visibility for Native Americans, but an opportunity to build long-term, reciprocal relationships," Angel said.

Schedule of events:

Monday, Oct. 10
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 7-8:30 p.m., FlexSpace, Roesch Library: Film screening of We Shall Remain: After the Mayflower.

Tuesday, Oct. 11
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 7-8:30 p.m., FlexSpace, Roesch Library: Film screening of We Shall Remain: Trail of Tears.

Wednesday, Oct. 12
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 7-8:30 p.m., FlexSpace, Roesch Library: Film screening of We Shall Remain: Wounded Knee.

Thursday, Oct. 13
10:30-11:45 a.m., Kennedy Union room 331: "Part I — Traditional Native Herb Science: Humans Are Only One Part of the Medicine Wheel." Linda Different Cloud Jones, ethnic botanist and Ph.D. candidate, and Leon Briggs, an educator at the Tonawanda Indian Reservation, will give a cosmological overview of traditional native herb science.

Noon to 1:10 p.m., Kennedy Union Ballroom: "Book Discussion and Luncheon with Kent Nerburn." Nerburn, an award-winning author, sculptor and educator, will discuss his novels Neither Wolf Nor Dog and Wolf At Twilight, followed by questions and comments from the audience. (Registration now closed).

1:30-2:45 p.m., Kennedy Union room 331: "Critical Approaches to American Indian Literature." Moderated by Tereza Szeghi, an English professor at the University of Dayton.

3-4:15 p.m., Kennedy Union 331: "Part II - Traditional Native Herb Science: Identification and Preparation of Medicinal Plants." Linda Different Cloud Jones and Leon Briggs will discuss how to identify and prepare medicinal plants for use.

7-9 p.m., Sears Recital Hall, Humanities Building: "Shadows of an Unremembered Past." Kent Nerburn will reflect on the implications of overlooking the nation's unjust treatment of Native Americans.

Friday, Oct. 14
10-10:50 a.m., Kennedy Union room 331: "The Struggle for Equality." Social Studies teacher Kevin Lyde and ninth-graders from the Dayton School for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math will present the development and implementation of a pilot history course.

NOTE: From noon to 2 p.m. there will be concurrent sessions marked with an (*)

11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Kennedy Union room 331: "Initiating Dialogue: Perspectives on the Intersection of Christianity and Native Peoples Past and Present."

11-11:50 a.m.: "Part I: Catholic Perspectives on the Intersection of Christianity and Native Peoples." Cecilia Moore, a religious studies professor at the University of Dayton, will interview Deacon Earl Rogers about his experiences ministering for many years in a Native American Catholic community in New Mexico.

* Noon to 12:50 p.m.: "Brown Bag Luncheon Part II: Native Perspectives on the Intersection of Christianity and Native Peoples." Moderated by Mary Anne Angel.

* 1-1:50 p.m.: "Part III: Building Right Relationship Between Christians and Native Peoples." Moderated by Mary Anne Angel.

* Noon to 2:50 p.m., FlexSpace Roesch Library: Film screening of The Last Conquistador. Moderated by Jack T.F. Ling, the executive director of institutional diversity and inclusion at the University of Dayton, and Carlos Stewart, the assistant director for the office of multicultural affairs.

2-4:30 p.m., Kennedy Union amphitheater: "Performances, Storytelling and Demonstrations of Traditional Arts and Crafts." Performances by flutist John DeBoer, Lakota drumming group Maurice Hotain and the Chaske Hotain Singers, and local performing arts duo Ga-Li. In case of inclement weather, this event will be moved to the Kennedy Union Torch Lounge.

6:30-8 p.m., Kennedy Union Ballroom: "Two Modern Day Medicine Stories." Nancy Scott will discuss post-traumatic stress disorder and its impact on high-risk groups such as native peoples and veterans. Shianne Eagleheart will share the Wounded Bear model of healing, including the multimedia story of Vietnam veterans who returned to Vietnam in 2010 to heal relationships with Vietnamese soldiers.

8-9:30 p.m., Kennedy Union Ballroom: "Honor Ceremony for Veterans" hosted by Maurice Hotain and the Chaske Hotain Singers.

For more information on all events, contact Mary Anne Angel at mary.angel@notes.udayton.edu.

For more information, contact Meagan Pant, assistant director of media relations, at 937-229-3256 or mpant1@udayton.edu.

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