Thursday September 11, 2014

ArtsLIVE

A new name, a new emphasis. The Arts Series becomes ArtsLIVE and brings jazz, international and classical live performances to campus.

A performing arts series at the University of Dayton has a new name and will carry on Cityfolk's legacy of jazz performances.

ArtsLIVE replaces the University of Dayton Arts Series and will bring three events to the community each semester: one jazz, one classical and one international.

The series kicks off at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 2, in Kennedy Union Boll Theatre with Khumariyaan, a young quartet from Pakistan known for its intensity and its pulsing blend of Eastern and Western sound.

For a complete schedule of events visit the ArtsLIVE website on the "related links."

The University of Dayton is one of just a few dozen institutions with a performing arts series more than 50 years old. The series celebrated its 50th anniversary season in 2011. With its new identity, ArtsLIVE will maintain a spirit of adventurous programming that brought fresh faces and innovative sounds to campus to stimulate conversation about how the arts play a role in everything from personal identity to world history.

The name was changed to emphasize the experience of live art performances, said Eileen Carr, series director.

"National research trends show people increasing their consumption of the arts but doing so in digital and other non-live formats," Carr said. "Live performance will always be a unique experience, and that's what this series has to offer people."

As part of an agreement announced in December, the University of Dayton will receive revenues from a JazzNet endowment originally created by Cityfolk to support jazz programming in Dayton.

ArtsLIVE will use these funds to sponsor one jazz residency each semester that will include workshops and master classes both on and off campus, and a culminating concert open — as all ArtsLIVE events are — to the general public.

"We are committed to foster an appreciation for jazz in the greater Dayton community," Carr said.

ArtsLIVE schedule

Khumariyaan
8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 2
Kennedy Union Boll Theatre
Tickets are $16 for general admission, $12 for University of Dayton faculty, staff and alumni, $8 for students and children 6-16. Children 5 and younger are free.
Residency: Sept 29 through Oct. 3

"The philosophy behind our songs is to let the world know this place has better things to offer ..."

Traveling from Pakistan for their first U.S. tour, this young ensemble is known for its intensity, energy and vision. With their daring mix of Eastern and Western instruments, Khumariyaan has reawakened the live music scene in Peshawar, the ancient crossroads through the Khyber Pass. The lute-like Pashtun "rubab" is the core of this jam quartet; Khumariyaan (which loosely translates as "intoxication") also uses the zerbaghali (clay or wooden goblet drum) and Pashtun sitar (long-necked lute). Unlike most strongly vocal-based South Asian music, Khumariyaan is an instrumental band, knitting together threads from a variety of traditions, earnestly sharing their belief that music is a universal language. Their rolling pulse and richly layered sound builds with a force that has drawn followers among both urban and rural Pakistanis.




Steve Wilson & Lewis Nash
8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 6
Sears Recital Hall, Jesse Philips Humanities Center
Tickets are $16 for general admission, $12 for University of Dayton faculty, staff and alumni, $8 for students and children 6-16. Children 5 and younger are free.
Residency: Nov. 3-6

Supported by the Cityfolk Legacy Jazznet Endowment.

Lewis Nash and Steve Wilson are two instrumentalists whose playing is richly steeped in the history of jazz. Great musicians in their own right, they have been sought out to play with virtually every great jazz artist of this generation, from Dizzy Gillespie and Branford Marsalis, to Diana Krall and Betty Carter. Together they click like two gears, concocting their own brand of elegantly intricate music. They are leaders of their generation, as well as noted educators: Wilson is an associate professor of music at The City College of New York, and on faculty at The Julliard School; percussionist Nash travels worldwide conducting clinics and residencies as well as performing.

New York Polyphony: Faith & Reason
8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20
Church of the Holy Angels, 1322 Brown St.
Tickets are $16 for general admission, $12 for University of Dayton faculty, staff and alumni, $8 for students and children 6-16. Children 5 and younger are free.

This is a marriage of art and science that some might say was made in heaven. New York's exceptional chamber quartet New York Polyphony specializes in ancient sacred music, but for this program the all-male ensemble tackles some slightly more modern music and philosophy. Along with traditional selections, their program will feature a contemporary piece inspired by one of history's great naturalists. "Missa Charles Darwin," composed by Gregory W. Brown for the ensemble, sets Darwin's words (particularly from On the Origin of Species) to the traditional musical mass form ("Missa"). Even the melody reflects the theme, as it is based on a genetic sequence that reappears and evolves over the course of the piece. In the great acoustic space of Holy Angels Church, New York Polyphony's performance is sure to stir musings about the role of both faith and reason in art and life.

Greg Kallor
8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 22
Sears Recital Hall, Jesse Philips Humanities Center
Tickets are $16 for general admission, $12 for University of Dayton faculty, staff and alumni, $8 for students and children 6-16. Children 5 and younger are free.
Residency: Jan. 20-23

Supported by the Cityfolk Legacy Jazznet Endowment and the ArtsLIVE Endowment.

The recipient of an Aaron Copland Award for composition, Gregg Kallor is a pianist/composer whose perspective and talent challenges conventional ideas about musical genres. Although classically trained, his love of jazz has led him in new directions. Kallor has studied with a number of the jazz greats, including Kenny Barron at Rutgers University, and later Fred Hersch at the New England Conservatory of Music. Recently Kallor conducted the world premiere of My Coma Dreams, a jazz theater production by Hersch and Herschel Garfein. In 2012 he founded the Single Noon Records label — distributed by Naxos of America — which focuses on music unbound by conventional genre and category restrictions. In concert, Kallor will present one of his most recent and well received works, "A Single Noon" — a musical tableau of life in New York City told through a combination of composed music and improvisation. This is music, according to Hersch, that "has clearly absorbed the past and looks to a bright and borderless musical future."

Joe Driscoll & Sekou Kouyate
8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 12
Kennedy Union Boll Theatre
Tickets are $16 for general admission, $12 for University of Dayton faculty, staff and alumni, $8 for students and children 6-16. Children 5 and younger are free.

This world music project is a true 21st century triumph. A collaboration between a rapper/beatboxer/singer-songwriter from Syracuse, New York, and an electrifying African kora sensation from Guinea, this is music that pushes genre boundaries and earns raves. Driscoll and Kouyate blend hip-hop, spoken word, funk, and soulful, accessible rock with Afrobeat, reggae and irrepressible African grooves. In both French and English, the musicians take on burning social issues, commenting on poverty, borders, immigration and inequality. According to Driscoll, "We wrote about things that we knew and experienced, things that were important to us." It's a visceral "high-octane" response to life that destined to spark audiences into action.

Sekou Kouyate was raised in a respected and accomplished musical family in Conakry, Guinea. Trained in the ancient traditions of the kora (a 21-string West African lute), Kouyate is sometimes called the "Jimi Hendrix of the kora" because of his intense style of playing with various effects. Kouyate has toured the world over as a member of the Ba Cissoko band, comprised of his cousin and brothers.

Joe Driscoll, whom Cee-Lo Green labeled "the gangsta with an iron lung," has been touring steadily for years, spreading a unique fusion of folk and hip-hop. The modern day take on the one-man band, Driscoll (who now lives in Bristol, England) uses live looping to create soundscapes full of beatbox, guitar, harmonica, percussion and just about anything else he can make use of.

The Rose Ensemble: Land of Three Faiths
4 p.m. Sunday, March 15
Church of the Holy Angels, 1322 Brown St.
Tickets are $16 for general admission, $12 for University of Dayton faculty, staff and alumni, $8 for students and children 6-16. Children 5 and younger are free.

Sponsored in part by Larry S. Glickler in honor of the Marianists of the University of Dayton

The three great Abrahamic faiths — Judaism, Christianity and Islam — each are illuminated by a rich tapestry of musical work from past centuries. Both faith and reason are intertwined in these musical traditions of ancient Mediterranean Jews, Christians and Muslims. As sung by The Rose Ensemble, the critically acclaimed choral group based in St. Paul, Minnesota, these works transport listeners back to the Middle Ages. The program is the result of years of intensive research; at once sacred, secular, folk, and classical, "Land of Three Faiths" traces the language, spirituality and cultural exchange of these traditions. Highlighting the Hispano-Arabic Middle Ages as both an important and devastating chapter of history, laments of the Sephardic Jews mingle with Arab-Andalusian dances and Spanish court songs, while rhythmic cantigas, Hebrew cantillation, and Gregorian chant meet the mystical world of Sufi poetry.

For more information, contact Eileen Carr at 937-229-ARTS (2787) or ecarr1@udayton.edu, or visit http://go.udayton.edu/artslive

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