CAP Course Proposals

Faculty from all units are encouraged to develop courses that achieve the learning outcomes they have for their students, align with their own teaching interests, and contribute to the developmental approach to education embraced and valued on UD's campus.

How to Propose a CAP Course

  • Brainstorm with colleagues and your department chair about a new course or the redesign of an existing course;
  • Consult the CAP components about what category or categories your course might be well suited to fulfill;
  • Develop the course proposal in the Course Inventory Management System (CIM);
  • Consult with the CAP Office if assistance is needed at any step in the process;
  • Engage your unit's curriculum process to review and approve the course;
  • Submit the course proposal to the CAP Committee (CAPC) for review and CAP component designation. Refer to the "What to Expect During CAPC Review" resource for details about the review process.

Course Proposal Form and Tutorial

The Course Inventory Management (CIM) System is used to develop new course proposals and revise existing courses. You can log in using your Novell username and password, followed by 2-Factor Authentication (2FA). This is live data. Anything that you change will go through the designated workflow process for your unit.

For | Do This in CIM

  Existing Courses - Enter Course Number in Search Box and Click "Search", then select and edit the existing electronic course document.

  New Courses - Click "Propose New Course."

CIM Notes:

Related Links

CAP Course Review Guidelines

The CAP Committee (CAPC) has developed CAP Course Review Guidelines as a summary of the CAP components created by the CAP Senate document (refer to the What is CAP? section to access this document).  These guidelines are reference tools for the CAPC and are used as part of the CAPC review process for the approval of CAP courses.  We are sharing these resources as tools for those faculty developing CAP courses.

Please note that these resources are evolving, working documents and will be updated from time to time; be sure to check for the latest version before using them to evaluate your developing CAP courses.

Frequently Asked Questions about CAP Course Development

What to expect during CAPC course proposal review?

What general tips should I follow in developing any CAP course proposal?

How can the course successfully address the Catholic Intellectual Tradition (CIT)?

What tips should I follow in developing a Capstone course?

  • A Capstone course must provide students the opportunity to engage, integrate, practice, and demonstrate the knowledge and skills they have developed in their major courses.
  • A Capstone course must provide students the opportunity to engage in the scholarship, activity, and/or practice of their major and further their understanding of their chosen vocation, career, or profession.
  • A Capstone course must provide students the opportunity to present their work in a forum appropriate to their major.
  • A Capstone course may or may not be assigned credit hours.
  • Capstone courses must address the Institutional Learning Goal of Vocation and at least one additional ILG.

What tips should I follow in developing a Diversity and Social Justice course?

  • A Diversity and Social Justice course must have a central focus on one or more dimensions of diversity that are relevant to social justice. 
  • A Diversity and Social Justice course must have a central focus on one ore more dimensions of human diversity on the basis of which systems, institutions, or practices that obstruct social justice have functioned. The dimensions may include, but are not limited to: race, gender, socioeconomic class, and sexual orientation.
  • A Diversity and Social Justice course must address the Institutional Learning Goal of Diversity and may address additional ILGs.
  • A Diversity and Social Justice course may address diversity within the United States, in a global context, or both. Since the course uses a social justice framework, it will consider constructive responses to such injustice.
  • A Diversity and Social Justice course may satisfy other CAP components such as Crossing Boundaries (Faith Traditions, Practical Ethical Action, Inquiry, or Integrative) and Advanced Study (in Religious Studies, Philosophy, or History) or courses taken in the student's major.
  • The Diversity and Social Justice component may not double count with the following components: First-Year Humanities, Second-Year Writing Seminar, Social Science, Arts, Natural Science, and Oral Communication.

What tips should I follow in developing an Advanced Historical Studies course?

  • An Advanced Historical Studies course must be beyond the 100 level.
  • An Advanced Historical Studies course must further students' understanding of the resources that the Catholic Intellectual Tradition offers for personal, professional, and civic lives and also for the just transformations of the social world.
  • An Advanced Historical Studies course must engage students in liberal learning that connects theory and practice.
  • An Advanced Historical Studies course must have students draw upon the resources of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition as they consider how to lead wise and ethical lives of leadership and service.
  • An Advanced Historical Studies course must address a minimum of one Institutional Learning Goal. No specific ILGs are required for this component.
  • An Advanced Historical Studies course may engage students in the study and analysis of primary materials to further develop students' historical sensibilities in a way that illuminates the historical dimensions of Habits of Inquiry and Reflection (HIR) learning goals.
  • An Advanced Historical Studies course may examine a historical topic drawing on the work of historians to show how interpretations of the past may change over time.
  • An Advanced Historical Studies course may focus on issues related to, and satisfy the criteria for, the Crossing Boundaries component (Faith Traditions, Practical Ethical Action, Inquiry, or Integrative).
  • An Advanced Historical Studies course may be offered by a department other than History. The criteria for this requirement are disciplinary-based in the field of historical studies and, therefore, not limited to specific departments. Courses offered outside the Department of History may count towards the Advanced Historical Studies requirement if the course draws extensively from that disciplinary perspective and addresses in significant ways aspects of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition.

What tips should I follow in developing an Advanced Philosophical Studies course?

  • An Advanced Philosophical Studies course must be beyond the 100 level.
  • An Advanced Philosophical Studies course must deepen students' knowledge of the philosophical traditions that inform the Catholic and Marianist education.
  • An Advanced Philosophical Studies course must assist students in constructing integrated knowledge of the central human questions examined in liberal education – especially when conducted in an interdisciplinary course.
  • An Advanced Philosophical Studies course must further students' understanding of the resources that the Catholic Intellectual Tradition offers for personal, professional, and civic lives and also for the just transformations of the social world.
  • An Advanced Philosophical Studies course must engage students in liberal learning that connects theory and practice.
  • An Advanced Philosophical Studies course must have students draw upon the resources of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition as they consider how to lead wise and ethical lives of leadership and service.
  • An Advanced Philosophical Studies course must address a minimum of one Institutional Learning Goal. No specific ILGs are required for this component.
  • An Advanced Philosophical Studies course may evaluate competing solutions to theoretical or ethical options in the present day.
  • An Advanced Philosophical Studies course may draw upon the philosophical resources of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition to address the challenges of their times.
  • An Advanced Philosophical Studies course may focus on issues related to, and satisfy the criteria for, the Crossing Boundaries component (Faith Traditions, Practical Ethical Action, Inquiry, or Integrative).
  • An Advanced Philosophical Studies course may be offered by a department other than Philosophy. The criteria for this requirement are disciplinary-based in the field of philosophical studies and, therefore, not limited to specific departments. Courses offered outside the Department of Philosophy may count towards the Advanced Philosophical Studies requirement if the course draws extensively from that disciplinary perspective and addresses in significant ways aspects of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition.

What tips should I follow in developing an Advanced Religious Studies course?

  • An Advanced Religious Studies course must be beyond the 100 level.
  • An Advanced Religious Studies course must deepen students' knowledge of the religious traditions that inform the Catholic and Marianist education.
  • An Advanced Religious Studies course must assist students in constructing integrated knowledge of the central human questions examined in liberal education – especially when conducted in an interdisciplinary course.
  • An Advanced Religious Studies course must further students' understanding of the resources that the Catholic Intellectual Tradition offers for personal, professional, and civic lives and also for the just transformations of the social world.
  • An Advanced Religious Studies course must engage students in liberal learning that connects theory and practice.
  • An Advanced Religious Studies course must have students draw upon the resources of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition as they consider how to lead wise and ethical lives of leadership and service.
  • An Advanced Religious Studies course must address the Institutional Learning Goal of Faith Traditions and may address additional ILGs.
  • An Advanced Religious Studies course may examine the central beliefs, texts, or practices of one or more religious traditions or movements.
  • An Advanced Religious Studies course may examine ethics as a central feature of a religious tradition including the use of Catholic social teaching as a resource.
  • An Advanced Religious Studies course may examine cultural expressions of religious identity or tradition as the central focus of theological or religious studies.
  • An Advanced Religious Studies course may focus on issues related to, and satisfy the criteria for, the Crossing Boundaries component (Faith Traditions, Practical Ethical Action, Inquiry, or Integrative).
  • An Advanced Religious Studies course may be offered by a department other than Religious Studies. The criteria for this requirement are disciplinary-based in the field of religious studies and, therefore, not limited to specific departments. Courses offered outside the Department of Religious Studies may count towards the Advanced Religious Studies requirement if the course draws extensively from that disciplinary perspective and addresses in significant ways aspects of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition.

What tips should I follow in developing a Crossing Boundaries-Integrative course?

  • Crossing Boundaries courses will build on our strengths as a comprehensive Marianist university by engaging students and faculty across disciplinary lines and across academic units and by connecting with the Catholic Intellectual tradition.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will draw from relevant interdisciplinary knowledge as well as an understanding of the professions and social institutions.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will challenge students and faculty to link aspects of their own lives, majors, and careers to a broader world within and outside academia.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will emphasize the centrality of theology and philosophy, the importance of linking faith and reason, the integration of knowledge, and the application of that knowledge to personal and social situations in the world today.
  • An Integrative course must transcend disciplinary boundaries.
  • An Integrative course must address contemporary social issues and problems.
  • An Integrative course must explicitly examine significant social issues or problems in a multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary framework.
  • An Integrative course must bring together different disciplinary perspectives to enhance students' understanding of significant issues.
  • An Integrative course must address a minimum of one Institutional Learning Goal. No specific ILGs are required, though the ILGs related to Faith Traditions, Diversity, Practical Wisdom, Critical Evaluation of Our Times, and Vocation are particularly important for Crossing Boundaries courses.
  • An Integrative course may also be submitted to satisfy one of the Advanced Studies courses (Historical, Religious, or Philosophical).
  • An Integrative course may also be submitted to satisfy the Diversity and Social Justice component.

What tips should I follow in developing a Crossing Boundaries-Inquiry course?

  • Crossing Boundaries courses will build on our strengths as a comprehensive Marianist university by engaging students and faculty across disciplinary lines and across academic units and by connecting with the Catholic Intellectual tradition.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will draw from relevant interdisciplinary knowledge as well as an understanding of the professions and social institutions.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will challenge students and faculty to link aspects of their own lives, majors, and careers to a broader world within and outside academia.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will emphasize the centrality of theology and philosophy, the importance of linking faith and reason, the integration of knowledge, and the application of that knowledge to personal and social situations in the world today.
  • An Inquiry course must serve as an introduction to key methods of investigation, interpretation, exploration, and ways of knowing.
  • An Inquiry course must broaden awareness of differing philosophies or analytic approaches or conceiving of and resolving problems. 
  • An Inquiry course must contrast a student's own field with a different discipline's methods of inquiry (such as experimentation; creative practice; cognitive systems; analytical frameworks; or complex systems, languages, or cultures).
  • An Inquiry course must prepare students to think critically about ways of acquiring, evaluating, and applying knowledge claims within their own discipline. 
  • An Inquiry course must include a reflective and comparative component in which a student examines methods in his or her major field with those in the field of the Inquiry course.
  • An Inquiry course must address a minimum of one Institutional Learning Goal. No specific ILGs are required, though the ILGs related to Faith Traditions, Diversity, Practical Wisdom, Critical Evaluation of Our Times, and Vocation are particularly important for Crossing Boundaries courses.
  • An Inquiry course may also be submitted to satisfy one of the Advanced Studies courses (Historical, Religious, or Philosophical).
  • An Inquiry course may also be submitted to satisfy the Diversity and Social Justice component.
  • An Inquiry component of CAP requires that students select a course outside their own division to better understand the ways of knowing found in other academic disciplines. 

What tips should I follow in developing a Crossing Boundaries-Practical Ethical Action course?

  • Crossing Boundaries courses will build on our strengths as a comprehensive Marianist university by engaging students and faculty across disciplinary lines and across academic units and by connecting with the Catholic Intellectual tradition.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will draw from relevant interdisciplinary knowledge as well as an understanding of the professions and social institutions.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will challenge students and faculty to link aspects of their own lives, majors, and careers to a broader world within and outside academia.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will emphasize the centrality of theology and philosophy, the importance of linking faith and reason, the integration of knowledge, and the application of that knowledge to personal and social situations in the world today.
  • A Practical Ethical Action course is designed to cross the boundaries between the theoretical and the practical and between the liberal arts and the applied fields.
  • A Practical Ethical Action course must engage students in thick description and analysis of ethical issues using concepts central to the study of ethics such as justice, rights, natural law, conscience, or forgiveness and that the course provide sufficient normative content that allow students to reflect on value judgments and ethical reasoning and practical application. 
  • A Practical Ethical Action course must draw from relevant interdisciplinary knowledge as well as an understanding of the professions and social institutions.
  • A Practical Ethical Action course must address the Institutional Learning Goal of Practical Wisdom and may address additional ILGs.  The ILGs related to Faith Traditions, Diversity, Practical Wisdom, Critical Evaluation of Our Times, and Vocation are particularly important for Crossing Boundaries courses.
  • A Practical Ethical Action course may also be submitted to satisfy one of the Advanced Studies courses (Historical, Religious, or Philosophical).
  • A Practical Ethical Action course may also be submitted to satisfy the Diversity and Social Justice component. 

What tips should I follow in developing a Crossing Boundaries-Faith Traditions course?

  • Crossing Boundaries courses will build on our strengths as a comprehensive Marianist university by engaging students and faculty across disciplinary lines and across academic units and by connecting with the Catholic Intellectual tradition.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will draw from relevant interdisciplinary knowledge as well as an understanding of the professions and social institutions.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will challenge students and faculty to link aspects of their own lives, majors, and careers to a broader world within and outside academia.
  • Crossing Boundaries courses will emphasize the centrality of theology and philosophy, the importance of linking faith and reason, the integration of knowledge, and the application of that knowledge to personal and social situations in the world today.
  • A Faith Traditions course is designed to encourage students to better understand, reflect on, and place their own religious beliefs and experiences in a broader historical or cultural context.
  • A Faith Traditions course must incorporate some of the ideas from the introductory Religious Studies course. 
  • A Faith Traditions course requires students to examine their own faith commitments and participate in dialogue with other faith commitments.
  • A Faith Traditions course must do one or more of the following: 1) place religious traditions within their historical context; 2) examine their philosophical foundations or the internal logic of religious thought, language, and practice; 3) compare religious traditions by examining their philosophical foundations, historical origins, artistic expressions, canonical texts, and/or storied practices; or 4) examine a religious tradition with which students are unfamiliar.
  • A Faith Traditions course must address the Institutional Learning Goal of Faith Traditions and may address additional ILGs.  The ILGs related to Faith Traditions, Diversity, Practical Wisdom, Critical Evaluation of Our Times, and Vocation are particularly important for Crossing Boundaries courses.
  • A Faith Traditions course may also be submitted to satisfy one of the Advanced Studies courses (Historical, Religious, or Philosophical).
  • A Faith Traditions course may also be submitted to satisfy the Diversity and Social Justice component. 
  • A Faith Traditions course may be offered by any department provided that it incorporates some of the ideas from the introductory Religious Studies course and that it develops students' ability to examine their own faith commitments and to participate in dialogue with other faith traditions.

What tips should I follow in developing a Natural Sciences course?

  • A Natural Sciences course is is one of the required courses in the physical or life sciences or computer science, at least one of which should be accompanied by a corresponding one-hour laboratory section.  Lecture sections are either a pre-requisite or co-requisite to their correlative laboratory sections.
  • A Natural Sciences course must identify one or more of the five disciplines that the course addresses: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geology, or Physics.
  • A Natural Sciences course must challenge students to explore the scientific dimensions of complex, controversial, or unresolved problems facing human society.
  • A Natural Sciences course must further the development of the learning goals related to Scholarship, Practical Wisdom, and Critical Evaluation of Our Times by challenging students to achieve an enriched understanding of the scientific method by applying it to issues of broad public interest.
  • In a Natural Sciences course, the Community learning goal is enhanced through the team-based learning that occurs in the laboratory setting.
  • Each Natural Sciences course may or may not be accompanied by a lab.
  • A Natural Sciences course must address the following Institutional Learning Goals:  Scholarship, Practical Wisdom, and Critical Evaluation of Our Times. Other ILGs may also be addressed. The Natural Sciences lab can have fewer than the three required ILGs but must address a minimum of one ILG.

What tips should I follow in developing a Mathematics course?

  • A Mathematics course must enhance quantitative reasoning skills.
  • The CAP Mathematics requirement may only be satisfied with courses from the Department of Mathematics.
  • A Mathematics course must address a minimum of one Institutional Learning Goal.  No specific ILGs are required, though the following are suggested: Scholarship, Practical Wisdom, and Critical Evaluation of Our Times. 

What tips should I follow in developing an Arts course?

  • An Arts course must ensure that all students acquire a basic understanding of the arts as significant manifestations of diverse cultural, intellectual, aesthetic, and personal experiences.
  • An Arts course must assist students to develop skills and acquire experiences that enable them to understand, reflect upon, and value the creative process within the context of the arts.
  • An Arts course must address a minimum of one Institutional Learning Goal. No specific ILGs are required.
  • The CAP Arts requirement may be satisfied with courses from the Departments of Music, Art and Design, and English, and the Theatre, Dance and Performance Technology Program. 
  • The CAP Arts requirement may be satisfied with studio and performance courses as well as historical studies courses.
  • The CAP Arts requirement may be satisfied with one three-hour course or a combination of one- and two-hour courses.

What tips should I follow in developing a Social Sciences course?

The CAP Social Sciences component is fulfilled with SSC 200: Social Science Integrated. The course does the following:

  • Helps students understand the relationship between individuals, groups, and institutions.
  • Is a theme-based course that varies across sections but shares common learning outcomes.
  • Uses social science methods and social theory to critically examine a human issue or problem.
  • Uses at least three social science disciplinary perspectives (Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology).
  • The Social Science course must address the following Institutional Learning Goals:  Scholarship, Diversity, and Critical Evaluation of Our Times.

What tips should I follow in developing an Oral Communication course?

The CAP Oral Communication component is fulfilled with CMM 100: Principles of Oral Communication. The course does the following:

  • Focuses on the concepts of dialogue and debate, with the goals of engaging in constructive mutual dialogue in conversations and meetings.
  • Develops students’ understanding of the differences between dialogue and debate.
  • Develops students’ understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of each mode of communication.
  • With its focus on dialogue and debate, the course will assist students in the development of the skills necessary for learning, living, and working in communities.
  • By developing the ability to engage in conversation that advances understanding, students will be better able to interact and collaborate with persons from diverse backgrounds and perspectives.
  • The Oral Communication course must address the Institutional Learning Goal of Diversity and may address additional ILGs.

What tips should I follow in developing a Second-Year Writing Seminar?

The CAP Second-Year Writing Seminar component is fulfilled with ENG 200: Writing Seminar II. The course does the following:

  • Focuses on academic discourse, research and argumentation.
  • Students further develop reading, writing, research and critical thinking abilities as they come into contact with the ways that at least three disciplines engage a particular theme.
  • Develop rhetorical awareness about the arguments, approaches and conventions of these other (at least) three disciplines by studying scholarship across them.
  • Focuses on enabling students to take a process approach to making effective arguments in a complex academic context.
  • The Second-Year Writing Seminar must address a minimum of one Institutional Learning Goal. No specific ILGs are required.

What tips should I follow in developing a First-Year Humanities (Humanities Commons) course?

The First-Year Humanities (Humanities Commons) component is fulfilled with introductory courses in Religious Studies, Philosophy, History, and English. Each course in the Humanities Commons does the following:

  • Creates a foundation for student learning in the rest of the CAP and their majors.
  • Introduces the value of humanistic inquiry and reflection as a means of advancing the 7 Institutional Learning Goals.
  • Introduces the concept that learning is a process of integrating knowledge across disciplines.
  • Places particular emphasis on the diversity learning goal.
  • Includes common elements, questions, or themes across Humanities Commons courses.
  • Addresses the question: “What does it mean to be human?"
  • Familiarizes students with central concepts and texts of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition.

Contact Us

Michelle C. Pautz, Ph.D. Assistant Provost for the Common Academic Program

300 College Park 
Dayton, Ohio 45469 - 1302

937-229-3651