NAHM

Please join The University of Dayton and The Office of Multicultural Affairs in celebrating Native American Heritage Month

Educate, Empower, Engage


Monday, October 30: Native Blessing Ceremony

9:05 a.m. at the Kennedy Union Central Mall (Rain Location: KU Torch Lounge)

This will be a four directions ceremony to purify the spaces in and around us, offer gratitude, and ask that goodness comes from all we do. This event is part of the Native People of the Americas Colloquium, 2017.

Sponsored by the Native People of the Americas Colloquium Committee


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Monday, October 30: Lecture: Savage Conversations

10:10 a.m. in the Kennedy Union Ballroom

Professor LeAnne Howe (Choctaw) is an internationally celebrated author, playwright, filmmaker, and the Eidson Distinguished Professor in American Literature at the University of Georgia. Her interests include Native and indigenous literatures, performance studies, film, and Indigeneity. Howe’s books include Shell ShakerMiko Kings: An Indian Baseball Story, and Evidence of Red, and her upcoming projects including the PBS film Searching for Sequoyah and the opening of her play Sideshow Freaks and Circus Injuns in Toronto. Professor Howe will be sharing excerpts from her newest book, Savage Conversations, and discussing her international collaboration with Irish poets to commemorate the “Choctaw gift” to the Irish during the Potato Famine in 1847.

Sponsored by the Native People of the Americas Colloquium Committee


Monday, October 30: Luncheon: The Universal Language of Music and Storytelling: A Native Perspective

12:20 p.m. in the Kennedy Union Torch Lounge

Alicia Pagan and Raymond Two Crows Wallen (Ga-Li) will use the universal language of music and storytelling to explore the Native perspective that we are all related. RSVP to Mary Anne Angel at mangel1@udayton.edu. Registrations will be accepted on a first come basis until all openings are filled!

Alicia Pagan: Singer, storyteller, and arts and language educator; M. Ed Multicultural Outreach (Wright State University); Greater Co­lumbus Arts Council; Ohio Humanities Council; Director and Co-­founder of Ga-Li ; LULAC Council #39000 Education Chair; Co-founder of Del Pueblo Inc.; Miami Valley Council for Native Americans; Board Member Two Trees, Inc.

Raymond Two Crows Wallen: Singer, songwriter, musician, and arts and naturalist educator; Greater Co­lumbus Arts Council; Miami Valley Council for Native Americans; community activist; Fiesta Latina Presenter; co-founder of Ga-Li, poetry, storytelling and curriculum workshops and diversity -training for universities and community organizations; Native American Music Award nominee for the “Best Folk/Country Recording” category.

Sponsored by the Native People of the Americas Colloquium Committee


Re-Visiting Standing Rock: Multi-Media Memoirs Special Guest Presenter: Phyllis Young (Standing Rock, Lakota) - Moderated By Mary Anne Angel, Ph.D.:

2:30 p.m. in the Kennedy Union Ballroom

The Standing Rock Protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline was not only about water protection. It was also an international movement to show solidarity about many eco-justice issues, that are grounded in the history and culture of the Lakota people. UD students and volunteers, who made a spring trip to Standing Rock under the tutelage of Linda and Luke Black Elk, will chronicle their experiences through multi-media and firsthand accounts. Phyllis Young will join the panelists and re-visit what she shared with the students in the Blue Gym on the night before they left.

Phyllis Young is a life-long Lakota activist and Elder, who travels internationally to speak and work for First Nations, women's and legal rights. Young is also a co-founder of Women of All Red Nations (WARN) and a longtime ally of the Lakota People's Law Project.

Sponsored by the Native People of the Americas Colloquium Committee


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Monday, October 30: Keynote - Sarah Deer “Sovereignty of the Soul: Sexual Violence in Native America”

4:30 p.m. in the Kennedy Union Ballroom

Professor Deer (Muscogee) will provide a comprehensive overview of sexual violence committed against Native women and children. She will explore some of the most challenging contemporary issues as well as potential solutions and victories for Native women.

Sarah Deer has worked to end violence against women for over 20 years. She began as a volunteer rape victim advocate as an undergraduate and later received her J.D. with a Tribal Lawyer Certificate from the University of Kansas School of Law. She is currently a professor at Mitchell Hamline School of Law. Her scholarship focuses on the intersection of federal Indian law and victims’ rights. A citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma, Deer is a co-author of three textbooks on tribal law. She has received national recognition for her work on violence against Native women and was a primary consultant for Amnesty International’s Maze of Injustice campaign. Her latest book is “The Beginning and End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America.” She is the recipient of a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship.

Sponsored by the Native People of the Americas Colloquium Committee


Monday, October 30: Community Drumming and Dancing Hosted by the Chaske Hotain Lakota Drum and Dancers

7:30 p.m. in the Kennedy Union Ballroom

Join as we experience the rich cultural and historical significance of Native drumming and dance. All are welcomed to attend.

Sponsored by the Native People of the Americas Colloquium Committee


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Tuesday, October 31: Halloween Costume Psa: Moving Beyond Cultural (Mis)Appropriations

9:30 a.m. in the Kennedy Union Ballroom

The Native People of the Americas Colloquium is thrilled to partner with the University of Dayton’s Diversity Peer Educators to present “Halloween Costume PSA: Moving Beyond Cultural (Mis)Appropriations” on Tuesday, October 31st at 9:30 am. Students and faculty are invited to engage in dialogue about cultural appropriation, which tends to see an uptick in occurrence during Halloween, and how we as a university can create a more inclusive and respectful environment for the entire UD community.

Sponsored by the Native People of the Americas Colloquium Committee


Tuesday, October 31: Leon Briggs (Tonawanda Seneca) “Seneca No Face Dolls Workshop”

11:00 a.m. in the Kennedy Union Ballroom

Leon Briggs will conduct a 2-part session on the "Seneca No Face Dolls", commonly known as corn husk dolls. First, he will discuss the story behind the corn husk dolls, which comes from old teachings about vanity, equality, and respect for all people in our communities. Next, Leon will take participants through the steps of making a corn husk doll. No preregistration or fee is required to attend the informative session or workshop. However, those who wish to "make and take" a corn husk doll during the workshop, must preregister.

Preregistration (for those who wish to make and take a No Face Doll): RSVP to Mary Anne Angel (mangel1@udayton.edu937-760-1936). Registration fee for UD students is $10; UD faculty and staff is $15; for non-UD participants is $20. Registrations will be accepted on a first come basis until openings are filled!

 Leon Briggs (Seneca Nation, Tonowanda Reserve) is a blacksmith and owner of Medicine Bow Forge, traditional artist and craftsman, educator on: traditional Seneca arts and crafts, history and culture, spirituality, herbology, stories/mythology, American Indian Movement, colonization, treaties, boarding schools, and indigenous rights.

Sponsored by the Native People of the Americas Colloquium Committee


Tuesday, October 31: Luncheon: A Multi-Media NPAC Retrospective, 2001-2016

1:00 p.m. in the Kennedy Union Ballroom

RSVP to Mary Anne Angel at mangel1@udayton.eduRegistrations will be accepted on a first come basis until all openings are filled!

Sponsored by the Native People of the Americas Colloquium Committee


Thursday, November 2: OMA Day: Native American Heritage Month Lunch

11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. in the Office of Multicultural Affairs (Alumni 101)

Join OMA as we dine together in the spirit of fellowship in celebration of Native American Heritage Month. A variety of authentic dishes associated with Native American Heritage will be served. This event is free to all UD students, faculty and staff.

Sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs


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Thursday, November 2: Film and Discussion – Short films: Ronnie Bodean, Six Pack and Gas Money, and Dig It If you Can

7:00 p.m. at Roesch Library Collab Space

Celebrated visual artist Steven Paul Judd (Kiowa and Choctaw) makes art “for Indians to have, and that gets white people to think.” His short films Six Pack and Gas Money, Dig It If You Can, and Ronnie Bodean are no exception, combining humor and cultural commentary in compact packages. Following the screening of these films, participants will engage in a moderated discussion led by Dr. Shannon Toll.

Sponsored by the Native People of the Americas Colloquium Committee


Tuesday, November 7: Native American Heritage Month Cookie Facts

12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. in Marianist Hall Lobby

Stop by Marianist Hall to grab a free cookie and learn a little more about the significant roles that Native Americans have played in the shaping of U.S. and world culture. 

Sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs and Office of New Student Programs


Wednesday, November 29: Two-Spirits and the modern Two-Spirit Community

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. in the Kennedy Union 310

Two Spirit people have been documented in over 155 North American tribes, yet their presence in Native American cultures was all but lost through the effects of colonialism. Join us over a pizza lunch to learn more about the historical roles of Two Spirit people in their communities, the effect of colonialism on Two Spirit people and their communities, as well as how Two Spirit people are building community today.

Sponsored by the Office of LGBTQ+ Support Services


Wednesday, November 29: Dreamcatcher Making: Catching Your Dreams

7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. in the Alumni Hall Lower Level - RM 016

The Ojibwa (Chippewa) believe that night is full of both good and bad dreams. When a dream catcher is hung above the place where you sleep it moves freely in the night air and catches the dreams as they drift by. The good dreams, knowing their way, pass through the opening in the center of the webbing while the bad dreams, not knowing the way, are caught in the webbing and destroyed at the first light of the morning sun. Join the Multicultural Programming Council as they participate in the age-old Native American tradition of creating positive vibes and encouraging positive energy, and keeping away negativity and encouraging peace and tranquility.

Sponsored by the Multicultural Programming Council (MPC)


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Thursday, November 30: Film and Discussion – Reel Injun

7:00 p.m. at Roesch Library Collab Space

Reel Injun, subtitled On the Trail of the Hollywood Indian, explores the portrayal of Native Americans in film. Reel Injun is illustrated with excerpts from classic and contemporary portrayals of Native people in Hollywood movies, as well as with interviews with filmmakers, actors and film historians. It explores various stereotypes about Natives in film, from the Noble savage to the Drunken Indian, and will allow students to see the ways in which these representations directly contribute to contemporary dominant perspectives regarding Native culture.

PLEASE NOTE: Space may be limited and admission is not guaranteed. Arrive early to secure a spot and note that seats may not be reserved for others as it is first-come-first-serve. PATH credit will only be issued to those who remain for the duration of the film as well as the discussion which follows led by Dr. Tom Morgan.

Sponsored by the Native People of the Americas Colloquium Committee

For more information about Native American Heritage Month events please call the Office of Multicultural Affairs at 229-3634

Co-Sponsor for the Cultural Heritage Month Programming Series - The University of Dayton's Office of Diversity and Inclusion 

Contact Us

Office of Multicultural Affairs

Alumni Hall 
300 College Park 
Dayton, Ohio 45469 

937.229.3634