I Think I Was Assaulted

We believe you. It's not your fault. You have options.

1. Consider calling someone for support.

Tell a friend, family member, a counselor, or someone else you trust about what happened. Telling someone is important - it can help you begin to process what happened and decide what to do next.

RAINN is a national sexual assault hotline that is free, confidential, and secure. The line is open 24/7 and you can access it online or over the phone. (800) 656-4673.

It is never too late to tell someone. It doesn't matter if it has been a few hours, a week, a month, or years. if you think you have been assaulted then telling someone close to you can be the first step.

Click HERE for more information about how to help a friend who tells you they were assaulted. 

2. Consider seeking medical attention.

Your mental and physical health are important. A medical exam is important because it offers treatment for any potential injuries and creates an opportunity for you to get any other help you may need.

If you can help it, it is best to avoid showering, brushing your teeth or changing your clothes. Click HERE for more details about preserving evidence. 

If you have already showered, it is ok. It is not your fault - showering is a very natural reaction to experiencing this type of trauma. It is still a good idea to get a medical examination in order to ensure that you are physically healthy. 

The Miami Valley Hospital will provide SANE kits (commonly referred to as a "rape" kit) free of charge. Your first step can be to call Public Safety at 937-229-2121 or 911 (on a campus phone) to be taken to the Emergency Room. Local hospitals have a special group of nurses and patient advocates that will guide you through this process and provide treatment.

A medical examination at Miami Valley can also lead to the discovery of important evidence, if the assault has taken place in the last five days and you choose to report. A medical exam is most important to secure your own health and well being and you are not obligated to do anything with any evidence that is collected. Any results or evidence collected do not need to be addressed right away and can be kept on file so you can choose to access them at a later time if you wish to use the results for any legal reasons.

The Health Center at the University of Dayton provides medical evaluation and care that is confidential (no one else at UD will find out).  However, they are not able to do evidence collection. If you prefer to come to the Health Center instead of the Emergency Room, please call 937-229-3131 and select option 2 (nurse line).  They will work to set up an appointment for you to be seen by one of our physicians for a physical exam and STD check and/or treatment.  If you are uncomfortable talking with the nurse, you can tell the receptionist that you have a personal issue and you can ask to speak with a female or a male physician specifically. 

3. Consider speaking to a counselor.

There are a variety of counseling options on campus. Counseling can be very helpful as you continue your healing process.

The UD Counseling Center is a confidential resource with a variety of individual and group programs that help students through the recovery process.  Information about their Survivors of Sexual Assault support group is available on their website.  Counseling services are free to undergraduate students, law students, and graduate students with assistantships (IEP students and graduate students without assistantships have a small fee).  Call 937-229-3141 to make an appointment.  If you are having a psychological emergency, believe you may be a danger to yourself, or may be a danger to others, please call Public Safety at 937-229-2121.

Campus Ministry is a free support resource to students.  Ordained ministers provide confidential counsel. Members of Campus Ministry are always available to speak to students and provide counsel. Visit their website for more information.

There are also resources available to you off campus.  The Montgomery County Prosecutor's Victim/Witness Division has trained advocates available to assist those who have experienced sexual violence.  Many folks who have experienced violence are unsure about who to tell and may be struggling with medical and legal decisions.  Students may contact the 24-hour sexual assault crisis line (937-225-5623) anonymously to discuss any matters related to sexual violence.  Advocates can provide crisis intervention, support during the forensic medical exam, information regarding the criminal justice system, and other supportive services and referrals.

4. Consider reporting.

If you are a member of the UD community and are interested in reporting an assault, you have options.

Amy Zavadil is the Equity Compliance Officer/ Title IX Coordinator and oversees investigations of power based personal violence on behalf of the University.  She can meet with you to discuss your rights and resources so that you feel safe on campus and have the support you need from faculty and staff.  You can report to her by filling out the online form available at go.udayton.edu/nondiscrimination, emailing her at azavadil1@udayton.edu to schedule a meeting, or calling Equity Compliance at 937-229-3622 to schedule an appointment.  Learn more about Title IX at UD by visiting our nondiscrimination website.

Christine Schramm is the Dean of Students and Deputy Title IX Coordinator.  You can contact her at 937-229-1212.  Kristen Altenau Keen is the Assistant Dean of Students working with sexual violence prevention, and she is dedicated to helping students cope with instances of sexual assault. Kristen can help you find the best resources for you, including contacting the Counseling Center, Campus Ministry, Public Safety, or Amy Zavadil. Contact her at kkeen1@udayton.edu or 937-229-1217.

Public Safety officers can also take your report to launch a criminal investigation and/or a University investigation.  You can contact them at 937-229-2121 or you can stop by their headquarters at Fitz Hall.

I Think My Relationship Is Unhealthy

We believe you. It's not your fault. You have options.

1. Consider calling someone for support.

Tell a friend, family member, a counselor, or someone else you trust about your relationship and that you may need help. Telling someone is important - it can help you begin to process what happened and decide what to do next.  If you are unsure if your relationship is unhealthy, get more information here.  If you are in immediate danger, please call Public Safety at 937-229-2121.

RAINN is a national sexual assault hotline that is free, confidential, and secure. The line is open 24/7 and you can access it online or over the phone. (800) 656-4673.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline is a free, confidential, and secure website that provides aid for people experiencing domestic or relationship violence. The line is open 24/7 and you can access it online or over the phone. (800) 799-7233.

2. Consider speaking to a counselor.

There are a variety of counseling options on campus. Counseling can be very helpful as you continue your healing process.

The UD Counseling Center is a confidential resource with a variety of individual and group programs that help students through the recovery process.  Counseling services are free to undergraduate students, law students, and graduate students with assistantships (IEP students and graduate students without assistantships have a small fee).  Call 937-229-3141 to make an appointment.  If you are having a psychological emergency, believe you may be a danger to yourself, or may be a danger to others, please call Public Safety at 937-229-2121.

Campus Ministry is a free support resource to students.  Ordained ministers provide confidential counsel. Members of Campus Ministry are always available to speak to students and provide counsel. Visit their website for more information.

3. Consider reporting.

If you are a member of the UD community and are interested in reporting intimate partner violence, you have options.

Amy Zavadil is the Equity Compliance Officer/ Title IX Coordinator and oversees investigations of power based personal violence on behalf of the University.  She can meet with you to discuss your rights and resources so that you feel safe on campus and have the support you need from faculty and staff.  You can report to her by filling out the online form available at go.udayton.edu/nondiscrimination, emailing her at azavadil1@udayton.edu to schedule a meeting, or calling Equity Compliance at 937-229-3622 to schedule an appointment.  Learn more about Title IX at UD by visiting our nondiscrimination website.

Christine Schramm is the Dean of Students and Deputy Title IX Coordinator.  You can contact her at 937-229-1212.  Kristen Altenau Keen is the Assistant Dean of Students working with sexual violence prevention, and she is dedicated to helping students after they have experienced power based personal violence. Kristen can help you find the best resources for you, including contacting the Counseling Center, Campus Ministry, Public Safety, or Amy Zavadil. Contact her at kkeen1@udayton.edu or 937-229-1217.

Public Safety officers can also take your report to launch a criminal investigation and/or a University investigation.  You can contact them at 937-229-2121 or you can stop by their headquarters at Fitz Hall.

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