SEXUAL VIOLENCE IS PRESENT IN OUR COMMUNITY. LET'S TALK ABOUT IT.

There are a lot of important aspects of sexual violence that we should talk about.  University of Dayton’s Relationships and Sexual Violence Programming provides variety, allowing you to create the most appropriate program for your organization.  Talk to the other participants, look over the programming that we offer (listed below), and let’s have a conversation that relates to your lives!

To request a program, please fill out the request form.  Details about each module are provided below.



Basic Modules:

  • Basic Introduction to Sexual Violence

    In our basic introduction of sexual violence on college campuses, we will discuss commonly used terminology including consent and bystander intervention. We will also clarify the purpose of Title IX and the "Dear Colleague" letter to emphasize the national emphasis on this work outside of the UD community. Learning outcome: Students will define basic terminology related to sexual violence prevention education.

  • Available Resources

    All members of the UD community must know where to find basic resources, policies, and advice for responding to a sexual violence situation. Learning outcome: Students will locate resources for reporting and supporting sexual violence situations.

Optional Modules:

  • Bystander Intervention

    We know that sexual violence happens frequently on campus - so what can we do? What action steps can we take to intervene when we see an interaction that makes us uncomfortable? In this module, we will discuss some effective bystander intervention methods and how you can get involved to stop a sexual assault from happening! Learning outcome: Students will describe a scenario they have experienced or could likely experience where they could apply a bystander prevention technique.

  • C2C - Know Your People

    Community is really important to us at UD. But how well do you know the people that surround you? How well do we have to know other members of the UD community? Is knowing that they are affiliated with UD enough? In this module, we will bring the conversation home. We will discuss the realities of living and learning on a Catholic and Marianist campus that often can feel like a bubble, the risks of being involved in such a close community, the advantages to always having your people so close, and the limitations to universal trust. Learning outcome: Students will recognize the potential dangers of innately trusting all members of the UD community and discuss tactics for developing personal awareness.

  • Communication

    Strong communication is necessary for healthy friendships, romantic relationships, and successful social interactions. Without communication, how can we ever get our messages across? In this module, we will discuss healthy communication, including the nuances of verbal and non-verbal messages, and how we can improve communication with our friends and romantic partners in order to decrease personal risk. Learning outcome: Students will identify effective communication methods that can be used in a variety of settings.

  • Consent

    Understanding what constitutes as consent can be tricky, especially in the heat of the moment. In this module, we will discuss what qualifies as consent, the rumor that "sometimes no doesn't really mean no when someone is playing hard to get," deciphering verbal and non-verbal cues, the decision making process that leads to the decision to consent, and why consent is so important. Learning outcome: Students will recognize consent and apply decision making skills to an everyday scenario.

  • Current Events

    Sexuality and sexual violence hit the news every day - especially on college campuses. In this module, we will discuss current events and how these are affecting UD's campus and students. Learning outcome: Students will recognize the effects of sexual violence on the larger American higher education community.

  • Determining Your Values

    There is a lot to consider when thinking about your values. Oftentimes we want to listen to people we trust, taking into account what our parents, family, friends, and leaders think about the topic. But it is really important that we use universal language, so that when a partner says "these are my boundaries," we can start an honest and open discussion. For example, we use the word "abstinence" quite often, especially when discussing our values and morals. But do you really know what the term means? What about "promiscuous"? Or "slut"? Or "virgin"? We use these terms without having an agreed upon definition. In this module, we will focus conversation on determining your own personal values, finding your boundaries, and how those boundaries can be discussed with a potential or current partner. Learning outcome: Students will consider their own values and determine their own understanding of commonly used terminology.

  • Effects of Alcohol

    There is a lot to consider when thinking about your values. Oftentimes we want to listen to people we trust, taking into account what our parents, family, friends, and leaders think about the topic. But it is really important that we use universal language, so that when a partner says "these are my boundaries," we can start an honest and open discussion. For example, we use the word "abstinence" quite often, especially when discussing our values and morals. But do you really know what the term means? What about "promiscuous"? Or "slut"? Or "virgin"? We use these terms without having an agreed upon definition. In this module, we will focus conversation on determining your own personal values, finding your boundaries, and how those boundaries can be discussed with a potential or current partner. Learning outcome: Students will consider their own values and determine their own understanding of commonly used terminology.

  • Fears of Sexual Assualt

    Growing up, many of us are given subliminal messages about how to stay safe and what steps we should take to ensure we do not become a victim. These conversations, for better or worse, instill fear in us. We can move past these fears and turn them into action, but only if we acknowledge them and begin to understand their meaning for our lives. In this module, we will discuss the fears we associate with sexual violence and how we can transform our silence into action. Learning outcome: Students will identify their own fears related to sexual assault and methods with which they can move past these concerns.

  • Gender

    The combination of your social identities makes you the person you are today. Your gender, race, sexual orientation, body size, age, religion, physical abilities, and socioeconomic status all interact with one another shape the person that you are and how others interact with you. In this module, we will discuss some of the inherent privileges and oppressions that come with some of these identities and the added risk that is associated with many of these identities in regards to sexual violence. Note: this module has room for flexibility, so if you would like to focus on one of these social identities over the others, please let us know.

  • Get to know your social identities

    The combination of your social identities makes you the person you are today. Your gender, race, sexual orientation, body size, age, religion, physical abilities, and socioeconomic status all interact with one another shape the person that you are and how others interact with you. In this module, we will discuss some of the inherent privileges and oppressions that come with some of these identities and the added risk that is associated with many of these identities in regards to sexual violence. Note: this module has room for flexibility, so if you would like to focus on one of these social identities over the others, please let us know. Learning outcome: Students will explore their own social identities and begin to recognize the overabundance of sexual violence within some of these communities over others.

Optional Modules:

  • Healthy Relationships

    We know what to avoid in a relationship. But what should we look for? What are the components of a healthy relationship? In this module, we will discuss how to create a healthy relationship, some new ways to think about approaching a romantic relationship, and what true romance really looks like today. Learning outcome: Students will describe their vision of romance and identify key characteristics of their ideal romantic relationship.

  • Hooking Up Culture

    We have all used the phrase "hooking up" at some point, whether referring to our own behavior or a friend's. But what does hooking up really mean? And what risks may or may not be associated with this behavior? In this module, we will discuss the intricacies of the hooking up culture and some ideas to consider before engaging in this behavior. Learning outcome: Students will define "hooking up" and recognize potentially risky behaviors associated with the culture.

  • How To Help A Friend/The Healing Process

    Most of us know someone who has experienced sexual violence - that person may even be ourselves. So what do you do when your friend shares their story with you? What do you say? What does their experience look like? How can you help them? In this module, we will discuss how to have a supportive conversation with a friend who has been assaulted, what steps may be helpful to take immediately, what resources are available for both of you, language that may be helpful (for example, using "victim" vs "survivor"), and the healing process the survivor may likely experience. Learning outcome: Students will review a conversation between a survivor and friend and discuss their comfort with this conversation.

  • Intimate Partner Violence: Stalking, Bullying, and Date Rape

    Intimate partner violence is systemic, dangerous, and much more common than we often realize. In this module, we will discuss intimate partner violence, including stalking, bullying, and date rape, the effects of these abusive relationships, and what we can look for instead. Learning outcome: Students will differentiate between stalking, bullying, and date rape and walk through realistic scenarios to determine how they might respond.

  • LGBTQ Community

    Sexual orientation is often difficult to understand. Scientists cannot agree on its origins and oftentimes it is difficult to understand the orientations of others. In this module, we will discuss terminology (clarifying the definitions of gender, sex, sexual orientation, and LGBTQ), the oppression that exists against the LGBTQ community and how that perpetuates violence, and how we can work together to make the University of Dayton a more welcoming place for every one of its community members. Learning outcome: Students will explore their own understanding of sexual orientation and develop tools to support their LGBTQ peers.

  • Peer Education

    As student leaders, it can often be intimidating to start conversations about sexual violence and healthy relationships with your peers. In this module, we will discuss what is intimidating, your responsibilities as a student leader, and tips for starting these conversations. This module is ideal for students in a peer leadership role, such as Resident Assistants, Fellows, peer health educators, etc. Learning outcome: Students will describe situations that make them uneasy and discuss solutions for these potential problems.

  • Policy/Procedures

    Learning about the policies related to sexual assault and sexual violence on college campuses can be overwhelming. In this module, we will discuss the documents that are most important to you, where to find them, and what the judicial procedures look like if someone you know reports a sexual assault. Learning outcome: Students will locate and apply UD policies and procedures related to sexual violence.

  • Prevention Tips

    Unfortunately, as much as we would hope this to be true, UD is not inside of a bubble. We fall victim to crime on campus every day. But likely, you do not want to be a perpetrator or a victim. So how do we avoid it? In this module, we will discuss some tips on how to prevent being a perpetrator of sexual violence and how to prevent being a victim. We will also look specifically at the UD Neighborhood and discuss whether or not you feel that these prevention tips are realistic. Learning outcome: Students will recall prevention tips for being a perpetrator and a victim and feel confident in their successful implementation.

  • Question and Answer session

    Oftentimes growing up, we develop questions that we are not comfortable asking out loud. It can be difficult to find a reliable source, articulate feelings into words, and find the right time to ask some questions. This session provides that opportunity. In this module, we will open the floor to anonymous or confidential questions and answers. Learning outcome: Students will identify their confusion and contemplate a professional response.

  • Rape Myths

    There are millions of myths in our culture - most of which have little to no truth behind the message. In this module, we will discuss the rape myths that we have all likely heard, the accuracy of those myths, and the correct information that can replace them. Learning outcome: Students will identify common rape myths and disagree with their message.

  • Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

    Sexual harassment affects 60% of all working women, creating dangerous dynamics in office settings, sacrificing resources, and affecting many employees¿ job performance. As UD students are preparing to graduate and enter the workforce, many may be involved in these types of situations. In this module, we will discuss the behaviors that constitute sexual harassment, how to recognize it, and how you can address the harassment when it occurs in order to prepare UD students for the harassment that can exist amongst professionals. Learning outcome: Students will consider the dangers of sexual harassment in the workplace and understand action steps they can take in order to address future harassment.

  • Technology: Looking past the :)

    Technology is everywhere! So how does it affect sexuality? From online dating sites to Facebook "stalking" to sexting, technology and sexuality are lifelong friends. In this module, we will discuss the benefits and challenges of sexuality and technology's newfound love affair and how you can best protect yourself on the web. Learning outcome: Students will consider the effects of using technology and how it may or may not affect their lives long term.

  • Why Sexual Violence Exists

    Sexual violence has always been a part of human societies, but why does it continue to happen today when we are aware of its dangers? In this module, we will discuss why sexual assault continues to occur, the cultural messages that perpetuate the behavior, and how we can reshape our views despite the messages we receive from society. Learning outcome: Students will analyze American cultural messages surrounding sexual behavior and recognize these behaviors in their everyday lives.

  • Other

    Sexual violence has always been a part of human societies, but why does it continue to happen today when we are aware of its dangers? In this module, we will discuss why sexual assault continues to occur, the cultural messages that perpetuate the behavior, and how we can reshape our views despite the messages we receive from society. Learning outcome: Students will analyze American cultural messages surrounding sexual behavior and recognize these behaviors in their everyday lives.

Contact Us

Sexual Violence Prevention

Gosiger Hall 206 
300 College Park 
Dayton, Ohio 45469 

937-229-1217