Why do we need a Women's Center at UD?

To begin, our name is a little misleading. While we are the Women's Center, that does not mean that men are not welcome. We provide programs and services that are open to all students, faculty, and staff, regardless of gender.

While women have made remarkable gains in higher education, there are many reasons to have a Women's Center on a college campus. Women make up the majority of students on most college campuses and graduate at higher rates than their male counterparts, yet even college-educated women end up earning less on average in their lifetime and receive fewer promotional opportunities than men. Women of color face an even higher pay gap. Women hold fewer tenured faculty positions than men (having tenure ensures job security and academic freedom in their work), and continue to be underrepresented in certain fields of study. Women of color are especially absent in many areas of higher education. Men make up the majority of college presidents and on average, hold more Board of Trustee seats than women.

Why do we need a Women's Center- mainly because gender equity has not been achieved. Here are a few other reasons...

Representation

  • Women make up 49% of full-time undergraduate students at UD – that’s 3,632 students out of a total 7,475 undergraduate students. 
  • Women of color make up only 4% of undergraduate students at UD – that’s 319 students out of a total of 7,475.
  • International women make up only 3% of undergraduate students at UD – that’s 221 students out of a total of 7,475. 
  • Women make up 52% of graduate students at UD – that’s 1,311 students out of a total 2,522 graduate students. 
  • Women constitute only 38.9% of the total number of faculty. There are 197 women full-time instructional faculty compared to 507 males.
  • Women faculty hold 30% of all tenured faculty positions, while men hold 70% of tenured positions. Tenure is important because it guarantees academic freedom and the right not to have his or her position terminated without just cause. 
  • Only 7 of 35 current UD Board of Trustees are women.
  • Only 8 of 25 current UD Vice Presidents/Associate Provosts are women.
  • Only 20 out of 100 U.S. Senators are women. 
  • 1 of the total 100 U.S. Senators is a woman of color. The Democratic representative from Hawaii is the lone woman of color in the U.S. Senate. 
  • 79 out of 435 U.S. Representatives are women. 
  • 32 out of 435 U.S. Representatives are women of color. 
  • 5 out of 50 state governors are women. The states who currently have women governors are Arizona, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and South Carolina. 
  • Only 2 women have ever been nominated as a Presidential or Vice Presidential candidate by a major political party in the United States: Sarah Palin (VP) by the Republican party in 2008 and Geraldine Ferraro (VP) by the Democratic party in 1984. 

Sources:  UD Student Fact Book, UD Office of the PresidentCenter for Women & American Politics (all data current as of 09/2014)

Self Image

  • Approximately 91% of women are unhappy with their body image. 
  • 58% of college-aged girls feel pressure to be a certain weight. 
  • Over 40% of women and about 20% of men say they would consider cosmetic surgery in the future. The statistics remain relatively constant across gender, age, marital status, and race.
  • Approximately 90-95% of those who suffer from anorexia are women and girls.
  • Approximately 80% of those who suffer from bulimia are women and girls.

Sources:  Do Something, National Eating Disorder Association (all data current as of 09/2014)

Pay Equity

  • Nationwide, women on average earn 76.5 cents to every dollar men earn.
  • African-American women earn 68.6 cents to every dollar men earn.
  • Hispanic-American women earn 57.5 cents to every dollar men earn.
  • In Ohio, women earn an average of 77 cents to every dollar men earn.
  • Only 24, or 4.8% of CEO positions in Fortune 500 companies are held by women. Some of the companies that are led by women are General Motors, Pepsi Co, CST Brands, and Hewlett-Packard. 
  • Only 16.9% of board seats in Fortune 500 companies are held by women.

Sources:  National Committee on Pay Equity, AAUW, Fortune 500 (all data current as of 09/2014)

Contact

Women's Center

Alumni Hall 2nd Floor 
300 College Park 
Dayton, Ohio 45469 - 0322

937-229-5390