Welcome

Mathematics is the study of shape and form, of numbers and patterns, of concrete examples and abstract generalizations. As a discipline mathematics is not easy to categorize. It is an art: there is great beauty in its execution and exposition. It is a science: it is extremely rigorous and it has an experimental aspect. It is pure: within mathematics one can create a whole universe and explore its properties. It is applied: many of the best ideas of mathematics arise from attempts at solving everyday problems, and some of its most pure concepts have surprisingly practical applications. It is a philosophy: mathematics is grounded in ideas. Most of all, mathematics is alive. Although mathematics has engaged human thought for millennia it is still today a vibrant and growing area of human endeavor with new and important discoveries. It is the goal of the Department of Mathematics not only to provide students with a firm foundation in the concepts and skills of mathematics, but to instill in them an appreciation for the beauty and power of the subject.

The Department of Mathematics offers a Bachelor of Science in mathematics, a Bachelor of Arts in mathematics and a Bachelor of Science in applied mathematical economics (in collaboration with the Department of Economics and Finance). We also offer a Master of Science in applied mathematics. 

Our alumni are going places

International Math Wiz

1972 University of Dayton graduate Richard Schoen has won three international prizes for math so far this year, including the Wolf Prize in Mathematics which is mentioned in the same breath as "a Nobel for math."

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Research Funding

STEM Catalyst Grants

The University of Dayton launched a new initiative to invest in and support faculty and student research across the sciences, engineering and mathematics at the University.

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Donation honors professor emeritus

'Eternally Grateful'

University of Dayton faculty aren't always aware of their lasting impact on students' lives. But Harry Mushenheim, mathematics professor emeritus, learned of his influence on former student Dr. Pieter Wiersema '74 when the latter donated $10,000 to the department of mathematics in Mushenheim's honor.

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Problem of the fortnight


Problem of the Fortnight

March 14, 2007

Pi Day Problem

Assume that the earth is spherical in shape. Peter wonders how long a rope would be required to circle the earth at the equator. Ingrid wants to place a rope along the earth's equator, but raised above the ground a height of one meter at all points. How much more rope would Ingrid need than what Peter would need? 

Solutions are due by noon on March 21. Remember, full explanations are needed!

The intent of this activity is simply to have fun thinking about mathematical problems. Anyone may submit a solution. You need not be a mathematics major to submit a solution.

Submit your solution here >

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Department of Mathematics

Science Center 313 
300 College Park 
Dayton, Ohio 45469 - 2316

937-229-2511