Denise James

Contact Information

Denise James

Associate Professor

  • Full-Time Faculty

Profile

Dr. James' primary research interest is in American social and political philosophy. She joined the faculty at the University of Dayton in 2008. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Emory University in Atlanta, Ga. Her dissertation titled "Critical Steps towards a Creative Public Sphere for an Actually Existing American Democracy," concerns notions of social justice and local political participation.

Degrees

  • Ph. D., Emory University

Research Interests

  • Philosophy of Geography
  • Philosophy of Race
  • Feminism
  • Pragmatism
  • Social Justice

Selected Publications

"Musing: A Black Feminist Philosopher: Is That Possible?" Hypatia, Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. 179 - 186, forthcoming 2014.

"Comments on Marilyn Fischer's 'Addams on Cultural Pluralism, European Immigrants, and African Americans,'" The Pluralist, Vol. 9, No. 3, Fall 2014, pp. 66 – 71.

"Reading Anna J. Cooper with William James: Black Feminist Visionary Pragmatism, Philosophy's Culture of Justification, and Belief," The Pluralist, Vol. 8, No. 3, Fall 2013, pp. 32 – 45.

"Whites, Tarry Here!: George Yancy on Whiteness, a Review," Radical Philosophy Review, Vol. 16, No. 3, Fall 2013, pp. 805 – 808.

"'The Burdens of Integration,' Critical commentary on Elizabeth Anderson's The Imperative of Integration." The Symposium of Gender, Race, and Philosophy, Vol. 9, No. 2, Fall 2013, 5 pages. http://sgrp.typepad.com/.

"The Hostile Gospel and Democratic Faith: Black Feminist Reflections on John Dewey and Rap," Contemporary Feminist Pragmatism, Hamington and Bardwell-Jones, Indiana University Press, 2012, pp. 42-56.

"In Support of the Girls from 'Round Here:' Black Feminist Reflections on the Utility of Rage for Building Communities of Support," Chapter 6, Communities of Peace, Poe, editor, Value Inquiry Book Series, Editions Rodopi, 2011, pp. 53 – 61.

"Black Feminist Pragmatism: Forethoughts on the Practice and Purpose of Philosophy as Envisioned by Black Feminists and John Dewey." Journal of Speculative Philosophy, Vol. 23, No. 2, 2009, pp. 92-99.