Magisterial Documents: Laudato Si'

Francis, Encyclical Letter on Care for our Common Good
May 24, 2015
The full document is available on the internet.

Brief Introduction

Laudato si' is the second encyclical of Pope Francis. The title (Medieval Italian for "Praise be to you")  is taken from Saint Francis of Assisi's 13th-century "Canticle of the Sun" (also called the Canticle of the Creatures), a poem and prayer in which God is praised for all aspects of creation.  Issued on May 24, 2015, the encyclical’s subtitle indicates the pope’s main focus: "On Care For Our Common Home."

Francis addresses the warming of the planet as a symptom of a greater problem, viz., the developed world's indifference to the destruction of the planet due to short-term economic choices. The effect is a "throwaway culture" in which unwanted people— such as the unborn, the elderly, and the poor—, and items are discarded as waste. The pope argues that humans no longer see God as the Creator and thus do not realize that "the ultimate purpose of other creatures is not found in us" (83). 

Outline

Introduction 
1-2, “Laudato si’, mi’ Signore” – “Praise be to you, my Lord” 
3-6, Nothing in this world is indifferent to us
7-9, United by the same concern
10-12, Saint Francis of Assisi
13-16, My appeal

Chapter 1
17-19, What is happening to our common home?
I.
20-22, Pollution and Climate Change – Pollution, waste and the throwaway culture
23-26, Climate as a common good
II.
27-31, The Issue of Water
III.
32-42, Loss of Biodiversity
IV.
43-47, Decline in The Quality of Human Life and The Breakdown of Society
V.
48-52, Global Inequality

VI.
53-59, Weak Responses
VII.
60-61, A Variety of Opinions

Chapter 2
62, The Gospel of Creation
I.
63-64, The Light Offered by Faith
II.
65-75, The Wisdom of The Biblical Accounts
III.
76-83, The Mystery of The Universe
IV.
84-88, The Message of Each Creature in The Harmony of Creation
V.
89-92, A Universal Communion
VI.
93-95, The Common Destination of Goods
VII.
96-100, The Gaze of Jesus

Chapter 3
101, The Human Roots of The Ecological Crisis
I.
102-105, Technology: Creativity and Power
II.
106-114, The Globalization of The Technocratic Paradigm
III.
115-121, The Crisis and Effects of Modern Anthropocentrism
122-123, Practical Relativism
124-129, The need to protect employment
130-136, New biological technologies

Chapter 4
137, Integral Ecology
I.
138-142, Environmental, Economic and Social Ecology
II.
143-146, Cultural Ecology
III.
147-155, Ecology of Daily Life
IV
156-158, The Principle of The Common Good
V.
159-162, Justice Between the Generations

Chapter 5
163, Lines of Approach and Action
I.
164-175, Dialogue on The Environment in The International Community
II.
176-181, Dialogue for New National and Local Policies
III.
182-188, Dialogue and Transparency in Decision-Making
IV.
189-198, Politics and Economy in Dialogue for Human Fulfilment
V.
199-201, Religions in Dialogue with Science

Chapter 6
202, Ecological Education and Spirituality
I.
203-208, Towards A New Lifestyle
II.
209-215, Educating for The Covenant Between Humanity and The Environment
III.
216-221, Ecological Conversion
IV.
222-227, Joy and Peace
V.
228-232, Civic and Political Love
VI.
233-237, Sacramental Signs and The Celebration of Rest
VII.
238-240, The Trinity and The Relationship Between Creatures
VIII.
241-242, Queen of All Creation
IX.
243-245, Beyond the Sun

Conclusion
246, A Prayer for Our Earth – A Christian prayer in union with creation


© This material has been compiled by Danielle M. Peters, S.T.D.
Copyright is reserved for The Marian Library/International Marian Research Institute.
Most recently updated in 2018.

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