Monday May 23, 2016

Dr. Eustace Awarded Carnegie Fellowship!

By Karen Updyke

Dr. Deogratias Eustace, civil engineering, awarded Carnegie fellowship to work in Tanzania.

Dr. Eustace, associate professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Mechanics and director of the University of Dayton's Transportation Engineering Laboratory, was awarded a fellowship by the Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program to travel to the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and collaborate with and Dr. Hannibal Bwire, Department of Transportation and Geotechnical Engineering, on Curriculum Co-development for a Graduate Transportation Engineering Program.

The University of Dar es Salaam project is one of 57 projects that will pair African Diaspora scholars with higher education institutions in Africa to collaborate on curriculum co-development, research, graduate teaching, training and mentoring activities. Dr. Eustace is one of 59 African Diaspora scholars who have been awarded fellowships to travel to Africa beginning in May 2016 to conduct a wide range of projects across disciplines, from agroforestry to e-learning modules for nursing, and from ethnomusicology to military mental health. The program has now selected and approved a total of 169 Fellows since its inception in 2013.

The University of Dar es Salaam project is one of 57 projects that will pair African Diaspora scholars with higher education institutions in Africa to collaborate on curriculum co-development, research, graduate teaching, training and mentoring activities. Dr. Eustace is one of 59 African Diaspora scholars who have been awarded fellowships to travel to Africa beginning in May 2016 to conduct a wide range of projects across disciplines, from agroforestry to e-learning modules for nursing, and from ethnomusicology to military mental health. The Program has now selected and approved a total of 169 Fellows since its inception in 2013.

The Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program facilitates engagement between scholars born in Africa, who are now based in the United States or Canada, and scholars in Africa on mutually beneficial academic activities. The Advisory Council selected forty-one African universities to host the Fellows, based on collaborative project proposals submitted by faculty members and administrators at the African universities, to meet specific needs at their universities. This innovative program is managed by the Institute of International Education (IIE) in collaboration with United States International University-Africa (USIU-Africa) in Nairobi, through Dr. Paul Tiyambe Zeleza, who chairs the Advisory Council, and is funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

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